New figures from Age UK show our social care system is disintegrating | Care Industry News


New figures from Age UK reveal the shocking extent to which millions of older people are being left to prop up the country’s disintegrating care system, with those aged 65 and over providing nearly 54 million hours of unpaid care each week in England in 2016[i].

These figures highlight the rising demands being placed on older informal carers as Government underfunding causes the social care safety net to shrink, resulting in increasing numbers of our older population in need of care, being thrown back on their own and their family’s resources.

In 2015/16, over two and a quarter million (2,299,200) people aged 65 and over provided care – a 16.6 per cent increase on five years ago when 1,829,200 did so[ii],[iii].

Over 400,000 (404,400) of these unpaid carers are from the oldest demographic in our society (aged 80 and over), and they provided 12.7 million hours of care in 2015/16 – a 12.7 per cent increase from 2009/10[iv],[v].

Most older people willingly take on the task of helping to care for a loved one – usually but not always a husband or wife – and don’t think of themselves as doing anything out of the ordinary. However, leaving older people to shoulder too much, or sometimes all of the responsibility and hard work of looking after someone in declining health and with significant care needs is unfair. It can also put these older family carers’ own health at risk, and many of them are coping with health problems themselves.

Over half (54.8 per cent) of people aged 65 and over who provide at least one hour of care have a long-standing illness or disability – equating to well over a million people (1,262,500), or one in ten (10.7%) of all these family carers

 

Source: New figures from Age UK show our social care system is disintegrating | Care Industry News

One thought on “New figures from Age UK show our social care system is disintegrating | Care Industry News

  1. This research is only looking at the care of the elderly and their elderly carers, but what about the vast number of carers young and old who are caring for their disabled relatives.

    With disable persons living longer many of their carers are elderly, with many in their 70s and 80s and there will be some in their 90s.

    So, in reflection the state of the total care market is much worse than these figures are stating, even though these figure are indicating a system verging on disintegration.

    If the unpaid carers were all unable to offer to care the care system would not not be able to cope. The unpaid family carers are an unseen force who do really care unlike the care system and those responsible for it finance.

    Like

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