Buses could be history sooner than you think – here’s why : The Conversation


In 1890, no one foresaw the rise of the internal combustion engine: horses were the fastest means of transport, and a status symbol. Today, society stands at a similar tipping point. No one can really predict how transport will be used in the coming century, or if people will even need to travel as much as they do today. But some of the most commonly used modes of public transport may be closer to extinction than previously thought.

Buses have been a reliable feature of urban and rural landscapes for more than 200 years. They have helped to define communities; think of London’s red double-decker bus, or the iconic Greyhound bus across the US. And buses have traditionally been a great social leveller: ethnic minority groups fought hard for the right to share the same seats and stops and the poor enjoy the same regulated prices as the middle class.

Yet the end of the bus has already been signalled. In the UK, there has been a reported decline in bus and train usage over recent decades – and it’s not related to the nation’s sluggish economy. Today, only 5% of journeys are made by bus, with 10% by rail, 1% by air, 1% by bicycle and 83% by car or taxi.

 

Source: Buses could be history sooner than you think – here’s why : The Conversation

One thought on “Buses could be history sooner than you think – here’s why : The Conversation

  1. This is all well and good, but I would wish to bring in the disabled community, people on restrictive incomes, free elderly travel and other similar transport users. Reliability, access for both booking and entering such vehicles, licensing, numbers that can be accommodated and cost to the user.

    All of the above have a bearing on transport accessibility for the above mentioned.

    If the costs to travel are too high then this is a major barrier as is the access to the vehicle and the limit on passengers.

    If there are barriers then this will affect usage, even though on a percentage of the population this may be low, but any transport need to be looked at with regards to Equality issues.

    Like

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