Subnormal: The Black Children Wrongly Sent To Special Schools


Years ago many mistakes were made, but am I being too kind in saying they were mistakes for where there other ulterior motives. Like in the article, stating ‘to keep ethnic numbers low’.

But, no matter the reason or reasons it was completely wrong and should never have occurred. But, is this or something similar still happening now, I hope not, but who knows.

Health over the years and also education have a lot to answer for, fror everyone should be equal, in that they are treated the same.

While it may not be proved, but I feel there was a large degtree of racism in the outlined practice and racism of any degree should not be practiced and be illegal to do so.

While it will not make up for the damage and hurt caused the persons concerned should be entitled to substancial compensation.

England and really the whole of the UK needs to relook at many issues to ensure the pest possible can be done and what is being done is equal to all sections of the community. To focus on any assumed or seen differences is totally wrong, for being a ‘human being’ should be the only focus, not, age, ethnicity, gender, sexuality or anyothers. We all need to learn to live with each other and for those you will not then the full force of the Law should be brought down on them. There should also be regular reviews to ensure full equality is being precticed everywhere within the UK, with no exceptions.

Same Difference

In 1960s and 70s Britain, hundreds of black children were labelled as “educationally subnormal”, and wrongly sent to schools for pupils who were deemed to have low intelligence. For the first time, some former pupils have spoken about their experiences for a new BBC documentary.

In the 1970s, at the age of six, Noel Gordon was sent to what was known at the time as an “educationally subnormal” (ESN) boarding school, 15 miles (24km) from his home.

“That school was hell,” says Noel. “I spent 10 years there, and when I left at 16, I couldn’t even get a job because I couldn’t spell or fill out a job application.”

About a year before joining the ESN school, Noel went into hospital to have a tooth removed. He was given an anaesthetic, but it transpired that Noel had undiagnosed sickle cell anaemia, and the anaesthetic triggered a serious reaction.

Noel…

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