E-Scooters ‘Not Safe’ Without Audible Signals


Yes, audible on e-scooters would be good, but more imoertant is the attitude of the person with the e-scooter for pedestrians.

I say this for my experience of persons on bycylces, some have bells but mainly it is their vocal out bursts. For those I have come across feel they have the right of way be it road or pavement. When I wish to cross a road, I will use a crossing when there is one, but in many instances there are not so I have to cross the road. Now in my 70s I am not as nimble on foot as I used to be and cross where I see the road is clear. But my slownest of step does on some occasions mean traffic may come while I am still crossing, Cars extra will slow down and allow me to cross rather than peeing their car horns, scaring me.

But not so with the cyclists I experience, they do not slow down, they shout very loudly and angrily for me to get out of their way, rather than excepting my slowness of mobility.

You could nargue that they have the right of way on the road and you may be correct, but if they do not show consideration people will get hurt.

But on the pavement, surely the pedestrian have the right of way and I nhave experienced on many occasions, more so han on the road with cyclists shouting and ringing bells, and many occasions when they have not done so, but pass me at speed very close to me, the first I know is when they go flying past.

As yet I have to experience my first encounter, maybe that due to COVID I have not been out for more than a year.

So while bells will be good on e-scooters it is the attitude to other users of the same space, which I feel is way more important.

Same Difference

A visually impaired woman from London says e-scooters are not safe enough to be used across the city as they do not have audible signals.

The signals, which alert pedestrians to the silent e-scooters, will not be installed for at least two months.

Transport for London (TfL) said in May the e-scooters would have audible warning systems that could be used without riders adjusting their grip.

It now says that all e-scooters on the rental scheme are fitted with bells.

The RNIB (Royal National Institute of Blind People) said e-scooters posed potential risks to blind and partially sighted people because “they are fast-moving, difficult to detect, and are often ridden on the pavement despite this being illegal”.

London’s walking and cycling commissioner, Will Norman, said the trial could not be stopped to fit them.

He said: “We can’t stop the trial before everything is brought in because we need to continue…

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