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Football romantics hoping to witness one of the biggest upsets in FA Cup history on Monday evening were left disappointed by the sight of the mighty Arsenal brushing aside plucky Sutton at Gander Green Lane ground with a routine 2-0 win.

At least, in the 83rd minute, they could take comfort in the reassuring spectacle of the non-league side’s 23-stone reserve goalkeeper guzzling a meat pie in the dugout. Such moments tend to be ripe with symbolism, epitomising an apparently egalitarian competition that allows pub teams the opportunity to dream of toppling Premier League megabrands, destined to be replayed for years to come in humorous clip shows and more serious magic-of-the-Cupdocumentaries.

To TV viewers, the goalkeeper in question, Wayne Shaw, actually looked like he had just stepped out of the pub. He was even reported to have joined Sutton fans in the bar at half-time.

Until Monday, at least, Shaw was deemed to be one of the game’s “good guys”. Before Piegate, he was the club’s unsung hero – Mr Sutton. As well as making occasional forays on to the pitch, he was goalkeeping coach, caretaker of their plastic turf and community liaison officer. He often even slept overnight at the ground to help prepare for match days.

To many, he was the antidote to modern football: a larger-than-life character who put the fun and commitment back into a bland, corporatised game skewed in favour of a powerful, moneyed elite. But it turns out that Shaw was not the messiah, exactly. He had been, in fact, a bit of a naughty boy.

Before the game, Sun Bets offered odds of 8-1 that he would eat a pie on camera during the match. He knew about the bet and scoffed down the food, he said, for “a bit of banter”. For this one misjudgment he has been hung out to dry.

 

 

Source: Give the poor Sutton goalie a break: this was pie-eating, not match-fixing | Anthony Clavane | Opinion | The Guardian


Plans have been put forward to cut hospital services in two-thirds of England, a BBC analysis shows. The proposals have been made by local NHS bosses as part of a national programme to transform the health service and save money. They include everything from full closures of hospitals to cutting some specialist services such as accident and emergency and stroke care. Ministers argue patients will receive better care in the community. Alongside cuts to hospital care, the proposals also set out visions for better care outside of hospitals, including: Bringing community services such as GP, council-run care and district nursing together into “super” hubs Getting GPs working together in federations to improve access in evenings and weekends Asking hospital specialists to work in community clinics to bring expert care closer to people’s homes But a review of the plans by the King’s Fund think tank warned they were not always credible because there were not enough services outside of

Source: Hospital cuts planned in most of England | DisabledGo News and Blog


NHS finances are almost at breaking point. Since 2010, the unprecedented slowdown in funding growth and rising demand have made it increasingly difficult for the health service to live within its means. In the past, some hospitals have received extra financial support from the Department of Health when they have overspent, but the latest NHS planning guidance signals a shift from this approach by asking providers to balance their budgets by the end of 2016/17.

But what does this mean for people who access health services, and how can they examine the effect of financial pressures on their local health system?

Health care systems around the world have to take decisions about which services and treatments to provide and for whom. These decisions – sometimes referred to as ‘rationing’ – are taken at many levels: by national bodies; by local commissioners and providers; and by clinicians. While some decisions are explicit (agreed in law or policy) others are less easily identified as they are based on individual judgements.

Commissioners, providers and clinicians base their decisions on a range of factors

Source: Six ways in which NHS financial pressures can affect patient care | The King’s Fund


Saudi Arabia some many human rights abuses and ruled by Saudi Royal family under extreme Sharia law and some terrorists have been from Saudi, but Saudi was not part of Donald Trump’s executive order. Does this mean President Donald Trump agrees with the rulings of law in Saudi , for such an outspoken person he appears to be quiet about this.

Or is he indicating it is Fake News or is it Alternative facts.

Josep Goded

For years, Saudi Arabia has had the honour to be one of the principal violators of human rights in the world. Regardless of its efforts to hide it from the international community, numerous local human rights organisations have regularly exposed the abuses perpetrated by the regime. In response, the Saudi government has banned all international human rights organisations from entering Saudi Arabia. As numerous organisations have suggested, the primary problem remains in the system and the interpretation of the Sharia (Islamic law).

Saudi Arabia uses Sharia (Islamic law) as its domestic legislation. There is no a formal penal code; the criminal justice court derives its interpretation from an extreme version of Sharia. In most of cases, detainees do not have a fair trial and are not allowed to meet with a lawyer during their interrogations. Further, the authorities do not usually inform them about their charges until…

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Romanian civil society celebrated its success after a decade-long fight against a gold mining project in Rosia Montana but CETA, the trade deal i about to

Source: This Is What Happens With Trade Deals Such As CETA – TruePublica


Across the world up to 1.2 billion people live with some sort of disability, it is estimated. That’s equivalent to the population of China. In the UK, it is thought that some seven million people of working age have a disability, which all adds up to an awful lot of spending power. Latest figures from the UK’s Department of Work and Pensions estimate that this spending power, the so-called “purple pound”, is worth £249bn to the economy. So what should businesses be doing to try to get a share of this money? That’s what we’ll be asking during Disability Works week from the BBC’s business and economics unit. We’ll be looking at how businesses work with people with disabilities and how disabled people have made business work for them. Challenging stereotypes I gradually began to lose my eyesight when I was in my teens so I understand the difficulties for disabled people getting into work. I’ve been a producer in the BBC’s business and economics unit for nearly nine years. I’m keen to

Source: Disability Works: Breaking down barriers in business | DisabledGo News and Blog


Alys Phillips admits she found it daunting when she did her first solo sleep-in shift as a care support worker two years ago. But now she says she would willingly cancel social arrangements to do more of the 24-hour stints, from 3pm one day to 3pm the next.

Phillips says her work with people with learning disabilities in rural Wales and the Welsh valleys is hugely satisfying. She helps with daytime domestic tasks in their homes, sees the residents to bed and helps them to get up again the next morning. She is allowed to sleep from 11pm to 7am – but is on hand if something happens during the night.

“Things do happen, but not regularly,” says Phillips, a 23-year-old graduate. “I clock off at 11 and go to sleep and I’m up at around six, ready for when the residents wake; then I assist with breakfast and help them get ready for the day. I’ve become acquainted with numerous service users and their daily routines.”

While Phillips insists she is not money-motivated, she does acknowledge that a recent, significant pay rise for the sleep-ins has proved very welcome. Previously she was paid a flat £30 for the eight hours of presumed sleeping time. Now she gets £57, almost double. She works for Cartrefi Cymru – a not-for-profit support provider – in its office, as well as in people’s homes. Cartrefi is one of a small minority of providers that have been able to raise their sleep-in rates in line with an official reinterpretation of minimum-pay rules that is said to be presenting a “£200m-ish” headache for the social care sector.

That considerable sum is the estimate made by the UK government care minister, David Mowat, who told MPs last week that the sector faced “quite a serious issue” for which no cost provision had been made. “There was a court case around sleepovers in which the law was clarified in a way that the government didn’t expect it to be clarified,” he said. “Now, potentially, charities – and indeed individuals who have got personal budgets – could be held liable for minimum-wage violations going back six years. And the cost is enormous.” (This is the same minister who suggested tackling the care crisis by requiring people to be as responsible for their parents as they were for their children.)

Source: Social care is on the brink. This new nightmare might push it over the edge | David Brindle | Society | The Guardian


For one hour every Saturday morning, lights will be dimmed and in-store music, display monitors and announcement systems will be turned off at Tesco’s Crawley, Sussex store.

Source: Quiet hour for Tesco’s autism shoppers | Daily Mail Online


The NHS premium is always there and the NHS needs to be forever vigilant to ensure they are being offered a competitive price.

For many years many manufacturers have seen the NHS as a way to engineer a large profit, whereas the NHS should be treated equally with any other purchasers. While no one wishes for these manufacturers to make a loss, they themselves need to take into account that for any penny that they take over and above for a reasonable profit is reducing the money available for the NHS to use in treating its patients, no funding is infinite.

This relates to all suppliers be they be Pharmaceutical, medical equipment or any others.

DWPExamination.

  • NHS contractors tried to charge a hospital more than £850 for a roller blind
  • The beleaguered Health Service was exposed by a horrified senior consultant
  • MPs last night warned that widespread profligacy was burning up cash 

Greedy NHS contractors tried to charge a hospital more than £850 for a roller blind – only for a canny matron to buy one that did exactly the same job for less than £23 from Homebase.

The extraordinary attempt to overcharge the financially beleaguered Health Service was exposed by a horrified senior consultant. MPs last night warned widespread profligacy was burning up cash which should be spent on patient care and accused NHS managers of failing to crack down on ‘profiteering’ suppliers.

The telling example of overcharging comes amid a deepening NHS crisis that trust bosses are blaming on a cash shortfall forecast to rocket to £20 billion by 2020. Last week 20 hospitals…

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KELLYANNE CONWAY: Basically because he keeps his promises. Everybody is just shocked that man about accountability. You could ask about Ivanka. I visited with her yesterday. This is a very successful business woman twice. Obviously she stepped away from it now but in the past she has helped to run her family’s real estate empire and on the side, she developed another fully unbelievably entrepreneurial wildly success business that bears her name. And I think she has gone from 800 stores to 1,000 stores or 1,000 places where can you buy. And you can certainly buy her goods online. She’s an incredibly creative, talented woman who also supports her father’s presidency and realizes that there are bigger issues that he is going to tackle and if she decides and it works for her family, she comes inside the white house here. She knows people like Deena Powell and me will be working with her to help on women empowerment. Women and girls.

 

Source: From the White House, Kellyanne urged Fox viewers to buy Ivanka’s clothing line (and broke fed law)

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