Archives for category: care

Parents and teachers expect a lot from teenagers: academic achievement, personal accountability, social independence, and the good sense to avoid bad decisions. When these expectations exceed a teen’s own sense of self-esteem and self-worth, he may deal with that stress by opting out — literally disengaging and refusing to attempt achievement at school.

[Why Do Teens Stop Trying? Understanding the Neurology and Psychology of Adolescence]

How Parents Can Build Intrinsic Motivation

When teens opt out and stop trying, over-parenting is rarely far behind. Concerned parents try to force teens to engage with more nagging, nudging, lecturing, and pleading. This reaction is natural, but it is also counterproductive. As parental helicopters hover overhead, teens are less likely to take control and accept responsibility for their future.

Micromanaging actually exacerbates the problem.

 

Source: “Can I Save My Teen from Failure?” : ADDITUDE

Advertisements

Homelessness is now a serious risk for working families with stable jobs who cannot find somewhere affordable to live after being evicted by private-sector landlords seeking higher rents, the local government ombudsman has warned.

Michael King said nurses, taxi drivers, hospitality staff and council workers were among those assisted by his office after being made homeless and placed in often squalid and unsafe temporary accommodation by local authorities.

“People are coming to us not because they have a ‘life crisis’ or a drug and alcohol problem, but because they are losing what they thought was a stable private-sector tenancy, being evicted and then being priced out of the [rental] market,” he said.

King said the common perception that homelessness was about people with chaotic lives who slept rough no longer held true. “Increasingly, [homeless people] are normal families who would not have expected to be in this situation,” he said.

 

Source: Families with stable jobs at risk of homelessness in Britain, report finds


In response to pressure from the Work and Pensions Select Committee the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) has announced that its target for upholding original PIP and ESA decisions at the first stage of appeal, known as Mandatory Reconsideration (MR), will be dropped.

On 28 November the Committee wrote to DWP with concerns about MRs, which had come up in the Committee’s current inquiry into the medical assessments carried out by ATOS, Maximus and Capita to inform DWP’s decisions on awards of disability benefits PIP and ESA.

The Committee had heard of “pressure to turn out numbers” in relation to both the original decision and at MR stage, and that MRs simply “rubber stamp” the original decision. The DWP revealed in an FOI request in May 2017 that one of the performance indicators for MRCs was that 80% of the original decisions are to be upheld.

The Committee queried how a target for upholding original decisions could be compatible with ensuring that questionable reports are thoroughly investigated, and erroneous decisions identified and corrected.

 

Source: DWP agrees to reform benefit appeals process following pressure from MPs


New figures from Age UK reveal the shocking extent to which millions of older people are being left to prop up the country’s disintegrating care system, with those aged 65 and over providing nearly 54 million hours of unpaid care each week in England in 2016[i].

These figures highlight the rising demands being placed on older informal carers as Government underfunding causes the social care safety net to shrink, resulting in increasing numbers of our older population in need of care, being thrown back on their own and their family’s resources.

In 2015/16, over two and a quarter million (2,299,200) people aged 65 and over provided care – a 16.6 per cent increase on five years ago when 1,829,200 did so[ii],[iii].

Over 400,000 (404,400) of these unpaid carers are from the oldest demographic in our society (aged 80 and over), and they provided 12.7 million hours of care in 2015/16 – a 12.7 per cent increase from 2009/10[iv],[v].

Most older people willingly take on the task of helping to care for a loved one – usually but not always a husband or wife – and don’t think of themselves as doing anything out of the ordinary. However, leaving older people to shoulder too much, or sometimes all of the responsibility and hard work of looking after someone in declining health and with significant care needs is unfair. It can also put these older family carers’ own health at risk, and many of them are coping with health problems themselves.

Over half (54.8 per cent) of people aged 65 and over who provide at least one hour of care have a long-standing illness or disability – equating to well over a million people (1,262,500), or one in ten (10.7%) of all these family carers

 

Source: New figures from Age UK show our social care system is disintegrating | Care Industry News


The more you hear about these assessments and the assessors the more ridiculous these processes are shown to be.

It would not surprise me that eventually, if not now, only to turn up for the face to face would deem you ‘fit for work’. Then if you do not turn up you are sanctioned. Either way the system gets you.

Yes, that is ridiculous, but no more than ‘handshakes’. Handshaking is the acceptable British way to greet people, not the kissing on cheek or cheeks which is more European.

In fact, could not the kissing on cheeks be deemed by some to be a possible sexual approach, whereby the shaking of hands will not be.

Govt Newspeak

c  ‘If you’re disabled and meeting your DWP assessor for the first time – or any time – DON’T SHAKE THEIR HAND! They ain’t your friend!

Do you shake hands? I do – with people I’m meeting for the first time, and often meeting up with people I already know really well. But the classic handshake is now not the single accepted greeting, and even with strangers you must awkwardly negotiate the possibility of the kiss on one or both cheeks, or bro shake with optional shoulder bump.

But I’ve been trained to think of the unhesitating handshake as simple good manners. The same, I suspect, is true of former pub landlady Bethen Thorpe from north London, who was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis in…

View original post 102 more words


Govt Newspeak

Disabled people protest against cuts
 ‘The Tories have repeatedly promised and failed to drive down unemployment figures while tightening eligibility and making cuts to out of work sickness benefits.’ 

Look closely enough and recent announcements reveal the two faces of Conservative disability policy. At the end of last month, Penny Mordaunt, the former disability minister and new international development secretary, announced the UK’s first global disability summit. To fanfare, Mordaunt positioned Britain as a global leader in disability rights, pledging to help other nations “tackle the barriers that prevent people with disabilities from fulfilling their potential.” Then the same night, buried at 10pm, the…

View original post 662 more words


 

#ProtectSchools

Call on the UK to Protect Schools

ALL children should have the right to a safe education. However, around the world, schools are attacked or being occupied by military forces and armed groups in conflict zones. This endangers the lives of students and teachers and hundreds of thousands of children are denied their right to education.

By endorsing the Safe Schools Declaration, UK Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson can support a global effort to better protect schools during times of war. The UK armed forces already have some of the world’s strongest policies protecting schools from attack and military use and can lead by example. It’s time Britain joined 71 other countries and endorsed the Safe Schools Declaration.

Sign your name and take action!

Source: Call on the UK to Protect Schools


A judge has dismissed a judicial review brought by national care provider body Care England against a local authority it said had breached its Care Act duties by setting fees too low.

Care England argued that Essex council had fixed the fees it offered to providers under a new commissioning framework at a level “significantly below their costs of care”.

It said this contravened section 5 of the Care Act, which stipulates local authorities must promote an efficient and effective care market and “have regard” to ensuring its sustainability.

The issue was highlighted last month by a report from the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) which found care home operators had been charging self-funding residents an average of 41% more than council-funded ones in order to remain solvent.

 

Source : ‘Care Act breach’ judicial review over provider fees dismissed : Community Care


Now these are area for consideration and there may be advantages but there will also be many disadvantages.

One of the main advantages will be that there is an ordered society, but the disadvantage is who creates the order and who will monitor it.

Society values change from time to time and when this occurs would there have to be widespread rewiring or reprogramming. and who will decide when, where and how.

Is this not the Big Brother of Orwell’s 1984.

Will this only be occurring within the UK or all over the World and if the latter, what about the different perceptions of Society in each individual country. Then if this is so what would occur when people visit from other countries where the aspects of Society differ from the country they are coming to.

On the face of it rewiring and reprogramming is the ideal, but when taking into account the practicalities, then may be not.
It is also open to abuse from anyone within the ruling classes.

In effect is there not an option at the moment with the rewiring and reprogramming substituted by some forms of medication.

Lastly, would any of us wish to be, within an environment, where everyone would be the same as the next person, surely our individual differences bring enlightenment to all our lives.

Opher's World

All behaviour is either learnt or innate.

There is no such thing as evil. That religious concept went out with the death of the Devil (another human invention).

That does not mean that people do not do ‘evil’ things. They do. We all have the innate behavioural pathways to do cruel, hateful, callous and nasty things.

But most of us don’t. Should the ones who do be punished?

Either their behaviour is the result of being damaged by their horrible experiences, of being taught badly, or of an innate character flaw. Whatever the cause it is down to bad wiring in the brain and bad brain chemistry.

What has been learnt can be unlearnt, wiring can be rewired, chemistry imbalances can be corrected.

In future when we have understood the functioning and biochemistry of the brain a lot better, rather than punish someone for bad behaviour all that will be…

View original post 77 more words


Is it not strange how these Government Ministers are willing to talk to people, but do not want to hear what they wish to say.

A case of I will tell you how it is but I do not want to hear your objections.

Is it that these Ministers are so far from the public that they have no understanding how their judgements and directives affect people and how they will proceed in reality.

Or more likely are they so not bothered what happens in reality and do not care for the majority of the population within the UK, as long as they and their friends are OK.

ukgovernmentwatch

Adam Kay was a junior doctor before writing a book about his experiences

”There are fears the NHS is heading for another winter crisis after 20,000 patients were left waiting outside A&Es in ambulances in the last fortnight.

It might be the latest problem for Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt but it’s not the first. In his recent book, Adam Kay wrote an open letter (which you can read at the bottom of this story) to him over his treatment of junior doctors.

Here’s what happened when Mr Hunt invited him round for a chat…

For an unsettling few weeks, Jeremy Hunt shot up in my estimation. This morally repugnant dark lord, whose hands are drenched with the blood of so many patients, whose policies and lies have chased thousands of doctors out of the profession, actually rose in my estimation.

I received a letter from him which essentially said “If…

View original post 1,084 more words

SouL SpeakS

He started Writing, The paper started speaking...

Letters of hope from the soul

I'm a sinner saved by Christ and I struggle. This is simply a blog about the struggle that I have. I am hoping it will someday be a blog about how I overcame my struggle with depression and suicidal ideation. (Cause if not that's gonna suck.)

Special Needs Siblings

Together Is All We Need

Live in Victory & Abundance

"Start Winning in your Today."

Govt Newspeak

Just a pleb exposing the cruelty of Neoliberal Governments

Recoup and Conquer

How to stretch a dollar, travel, and more

LD Carers Butty Group

A support group for carers of persons with Learning Disabilities and/or Autism in Sheffield UK

Life Plan

Make Some History

The Godly Chic Diaries

Smiling • Writing • Dreaming

Life with a Bear

Special needs, Complex needs, Non-verbal, wouldn't have him any other way!

Barbra Dozier's Blog

Just another WordPress.com weblog

Charlene Bullard

Believer, Mother, Educator, & Writer

%d bloggers like this: