Parties accused of ‘neglecting’ disabled people after politicians fail to show up for welfare debate : Welfare Weekly


Disability Rights UK: “Such a stance is dangerously neglectful.”

Source: Parties accused of ‘neglecting’ disabled people after politicians fail to show up for welfare debate : Welfare Weekly

The poor giving to charity is not the answer to society’s ills


To some extent you may be correct and many charities have been created over the last few years, but are they all because of austerity.

Maybe or maybe not for why are charities created?

Yes, many are created due to an apparent divide in systems creating a service which is not fulfilling the needs of some vulnerable persons. But is it purely down to lack of finance or is it that the current organisations, charities or not, are covering a vast area of vulnerability relating to a large expanse of conditions. Take for example Learning Disability and Autism, for both, in their own right are vast areas and can just one organisation cater for all, or is some specialism required. Then to what degree is the specialism required, for is it that each area of defined specialism requires their own organisation and therefore the finance which is available can be more directly focused.

If, we are saying that austerity has caused to increase in voluntary organisation, then what caused the need for charities to be formed, before austerity, could it be what I outlined above.

Here I come to day care provision, it could be said that all this should be provided by the Local Authorities, but, in my own view on this, local authority provision tends to be less cost effective then smaller organisations. For with local authorities it tends to be ‘one size fits all’, whereas it should be possible for smaller organisations to provide a service which is more ‘person-centred’and will provide more choice for those who are in need of care.

This all assumes that all organisations, even local authorities provide a service to all, which is of consistent good quality.

But after seeing the provision of care for my own daughter for the last 40 years, I have found good quality sadly lacking in many instances, many from the local authority.

This should be down to the Care Quality Commission (CQC), but again from my own observations the CQC concentrates far too much on bureaucratic process, in other words if the records state there is good quality, then there is good quality. However, while good records is one area, service is, in the main, down to human intervention, So, who is checking that the human intervention is acting in accordance the written words, not the CQC.

For if it was then Winterbourne View and Woolaton Hall and others would not have occurred.

In any Society there should be good and efficient organisations in the public, private and voluntary/Charity sectors and all should be working together to ensure good quality is at the centre of all provision.

Closure of York Independent Living Network, December 2019.


Hi

I am sorry to hear of your decision to close, but congratulate you for recognising your’ lack of capacity in being able to sustain and organise a network of disabled people in York’, be this by restricted finance or some other reasons.

I respect your vision that ‘should be greater involvement of disabled people in all aspects of social and community life, and that this is vital to achieving a truly inclusive society’.

I welcome that you have ‘made arrangements for some of our remaining resources to be used to set up a human rights forum of disabled people and their allies. We believe that we need to bring together a wide and diverse group of disabled people, draw on human rights thinking and take action to achieve greater inclusion. This forum will be coordinated by the York Human Rights City Network during 2020 and we hope it will spark the further and ongoing organisation and action of, by and for disabled people.’ This is showing foresight and showing your respect for people with disabilities.

I therefore wish the forum and the York Human Rights City Network all the best for the future.

I especially wish to thank yourselves Stephen and Abi for acting responsibly as Trustees in conducting your duties and wish all your colleagues the best for their futures.

For whatever the reasons for the forthcoming closure of York Independent Living Network this is no reflection on yourselves and those of your colleagues, it is just, that in the present climate not all organisations will be able to build on their previous successes, which is seeing many good and essential organisations to find that they are not able to continue in the manner that they wish to for the benefit of their members.

All the best for the future for all concerned.

Chris Sterry
a fellow Trustee of a Charity

York Independent Living Network

After much consideration we have decided to close York Independent Living Network.  This will happen at the end December 2019.  We make this decision mainly because of our lack of capacity in being able to sustain and organise a network of disabled people in York.  This is not because we think a network of disabled people and their allies is no longer necessary or relevant.  Rather we believe that there should be greater involvement of disabled people in all aspects of social and community life, and that this is vital to achieving a truly inclusive society. However, we at this time are not able to commit to the effective facilitation of such a network, so therefore have decided to take a change in direction.

We have however made arrangements for some of our remaining resources to be used to set up a human rights forum of disabled people and their…

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Only one disability charity fully supports Jodey Whiting petition


Is this a surprise, for it should not be.

For some of the national charities do receive some form of Government funding and it has been suggested that theyreceive this funding to undertaken some specific work and in doing so they are required to sign a clause stipulating that they will not criticise the Government. For if they do, they may not receive the funding.

This is a dilemma for these charities as they would like the funding as this will enhance the charity funds and enable them to do more inaccordance with their aims.

But, if the Government is appearing to not fully support persons with disabilities these charities voices will be mooted.

Children as young as 13 saved from clutches of forced marriage across Yorkshire – Yorkshire Post


Children as young as 13 have been saved from the clutches of forced marriage by police officers across Yorkshire.

A special investigation by the Yorkshire Post can today reveal 183 cases have been intercepted by police across Yorkshire and the Humber in 2018.

 

Source: Children as young as 13 saved from clutches of forced marriage across Yorkshire – Yorkshire Post

The Living Wage for Care Workers | Carer Voice


You may be aware of some of the problems with Social Care and the Government’s austerity cuts to Local Authorities and how this is affecting care services.

So, may I advise you about the petition – Pay all employed carers the Living Wage.

Please support the petition https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/236151

For more information please see attached.

Hopefully this will inform the Government and in doing so they will increase the funding to local authorities. These authorities can then contract to Care Service Providers on an increased rate so they can then pay their care workers at least the Living Wage, currently 9.00 per hour, outside of London, London being 10.55 per hour.

This petition is just the start as is paying all care workers the Living Wage, for good quality care needs to be achieved in all instances of care and then be sustained.

This is going to be a long, long road to cover, but if we all work together it is achievable.

 

Source: The Living Wage for Care Workers | Carer Voice

United against dementia | Alzheimer’s Society


See this year’s Dementia Action Week video.

Watch the Video

This Dementia Action Week, watch what happens when kids interview people with dementia. We want to encourage everyone to have a conversation with someone living with dementia, and what better way to mark the week than with a video showing just how much people with dementia have to offer the world?

We’ll be ramping up our campaign activity to ensure the injustice faced by people with dementia in the care system stays high on the political agenda

 

Source: United against dementia | Alzheimer’s Society

Shoppers face paying an extra penny for using self-scan tills | Daily Mail Online


Supermarkets are being urged to introduce a new 1p charge to use self-service machines as part of a plan to ‘heal divisions’ blamed on Brexit.

The proposal comes from a cross-party Parliamentary panel on social integration (APPG) which claims £30million could be raised by the scheme to help fund community projects to bring together people from different generations.

But retailers say it would penalise shoppers and effectively be a new tax to use the supermarket and shoppers reacted with fury to the plans.

The panel is chaired by Change UK MP Chuka Umunna and suggested the scheme in new a new report called Heal the Generational Divide.

The report suggests divisions exist between older and younger people, particularly around Brexit, with research claiming that both the younger and older generations would be happy for the other to suffer if it meant getting their own way.

 

Source: Shoppers face paying an extra penny for using self-scan tills | Daily Mail Online

Benefit cuts force desperate parents to rely on ‘baby banks’ for essentials – inews.co.uk


Increasing numbers of parents are being forced to turn to “baby banks” for essential supplies for their children because of cuts to benefits.

Little Village, an organisation which supplies clothes, toys, nappies and cots at three banks in London, said the number of new parents being referred to them has shot up from 773 in 2017 to 1,524 last year.

Sophia Parker, the chief executive of Little Village, tells Sky News that staff are “constantly shocked” by the stories and sights of poverty they come into contact with working at the banks.

“We see kids in shoes two sizes too small, without winter coats,” she said.

“We see families going hungry because they can’t afford food.”

‘Literally nothing left’

One parent approached by the broadcaster, Stevie Cooper, is eight months pregnant with her second child.

She has been forced to turn to the baby bank for supplies because of a delay in her universal credit payment.

“There are days when we can only afford to feed my son, so me and my partner go without, which isn’t great when you’re pregnant,” she tells them.

Source: Benefit cuts force desperate parents to rely on ‘baby banks’ for essentials – inews.co.uk