Archives for category: Crime

Now these are area for consideration and there may be advantages but there will also be many disadvantages.

One of the main advantages will be that there is an ordered society, but the disadvantage is who creates the order and who will monitor it.

Society values change from time to time and when this occurs would there have to be widespread rewiring or reprogramming. and who will decide when, where and how.

Is this not the Big Brother of Orwell’s 1984.

Will this only be occurring within the UK or all over the World and if the latter, what about the different perceptions of Society in each individual country. Then if this is so what would occur when people visit from other countries where the aspects of Society differ from the country they are coming to.

On the face of it rewiring and reprogramming is the ideal, but when taking into account the practicalities, then may be not.
It is also open to abuse from anyone within the ruling classes.

In effect is there not an option at the moment with the rewiring and reprogramming substituted by some forms of medication.

Lastly, would any of us wish to be, within an environment, where everyone would be the same as the next person, surely our individual differences bring enlightenment to all our lives.

Opher's World

All behaviour is either learnt or innate.

There is no such thing as evil. That religious concept went out with the death of the Devil (another human invention).

That does not mean that people do not do ‘evil’ things. They do. We all have the innate behavioural pathways to do cruel, hateful, callous and nasty things.

But most of us don’t. Should the ones who do be punished?

Either their behaviour is the result of being damaged by their horrible experiences, of being taught badly, or of an innate character flaw. Whatever the cause it is down to bad wiring in the brain and bad brain chemistry.

What has been learnt can be unlearnt, wiring can be rewired, chemistry imbalances can be corrected.

In future when we have understood the functioning and biochemistry of the brain a lot better, rather than punish someone for bad behaviour all that will be…

View original post 77 more words

Advertisements

The American Gun Lobby, Trump and the NRA put forward the arming of every American would reduce the amount of gun crime and ideally deaths from gun fire, what in this instance did the parties being armed achieve in saving lives and reducing crime, except, at least, one less gun happy person being alive.

Ace News Services

#AceNewsReport – Dec.08: Florida cop shot multiple times, gunman killed in parking lot: Manuel Gonzalez was working an off-duty detail in uniform to provide security at a Walmart when he confronted the shoplifting suspect, Miami-Dade Police Director Juan Perez said at a news conference #AceNewsDesk reports

Author: Tim Dees – Curt Anderson Associated Press reportsFla. cop shot multiple times, gunman killed in parking lotthe report stated that Gonzalez and David Facen exchanged shots at close range and the officer was struck multiple times, Perez said……..The 54-year-old Facen was killed by the officer……….Television news reports showed a body covered in a yellow plastic sheet between two cars in the parking lot. TV reports also showed the 31-year-old officer walking with assistance into the emergency room of a local hospital…….”Our officer is going to be OK. Right now, he’s in good spirits despite being shot multiple times,” Perez…

View original post 208 more words


These firms have now been named but have they been shamed.

Also have these firms had to pay any financial penalty for them not paying the National Living Wage.

Govt Newspeak

Fashion giant Primark paid nearly 10,000 staff less than the minimum wage, despite making a £735 million profit last year

I knew this vile company had to be involved

Primark and Sports Direct are among 260 firms named and shamed today for failing to pay the minimum wage.

In total, the 260 companies underpaid 16,000 workers £1.7m in back pay and have been fined £1.3m.

Business Minister Margot James said: “There is no excuse for not paying staff the wages they’re entitled to.”

Green MP and Best for Britain Champion Caroline Lucas branded the list “Brexit Britain at its worst and most exploitative.”

She added: “These figures show that bosses are continuing to exploit workers and take them for a ride. There’s a real concern that workers are set to suffer even more as the Government pursues its damaging brexit. Workers’ rights are under threat – and a…

View original post 4,209 more words


Now there is one more and how many since this one more, surely anyone with any brain cells can see that this system is ‘not fit for purpose’ as for as the public and all others who care.

But it is ‘fit for purpose’ for all those who do not care.

Where do the DWP and the Government and the ESA assessors fit into the above mentioned ‘fit for purpose’ comments, I will leave this to you, but I feel it is not that difficult to decide.

Stop UK lies & corruption

A man with terminal cancer died before he was able to appeal a ruling by the Department for Work and Pensions which stated he was “fit to work”.

Phillip Balderson, 46, had been working at a hotel in the Lake District but was diagnosed with oesophageal cancer in 2013.

He also had psoriatic arthritis and a number of mental health problems, including anxiety and OCD.

balderson-2Read more

Backup

Long term economic plan.png

View original post


Amidst the furore over US President Donald Trump retweeting messages attacking Muslims, by far-right extremists Britain First, the following tweet struck a chord with This Writer:

 

Source: What if Donald Trump had retweeted messages targeting people with disabilities instead of Muslims?


Stoke-on-Trent council called ‘callous’ for proposing penalty notice in city centre followed by court appearance and fine.

This article titled “Council proposes £1,000 fines for homeless sleeping in tents” was written by Helen Pidd North of England editor, for theguardian.com on Friday 24th November 2017 15.21 UTC

A council has been called “cruel and callous” for proposing £1,000 fines to homeless people sleeping in tents in the city centre.

Stoke-on-Trent council in Staffordshire is consulting on a public space protection order (PSPO) that will make it an offence for a person to “assemble, erect, occupy or use” a tent unless part of a council-sanctioned activity such as a music festival.

Anyone who fails to pay their £100 on-the-spot penalty notice can be prosecuted and fined up to £1,000 in court.

The PSPO will cover the city centre, Hanley park, Festival park and Octagon retail park.

Ruth Smeeth, the Labour MP for Stoke-on-Trent North and Kidsgrove, said: “This is a cruel and callous policy to inflict on our most vulnerable in the lead-up to Christmas. We do have a growing problem with homelessness here in Stoke-on-Trent, but punishing people for their misfortune is no way to fix it.

“It’s right and proper that the police take action to stop antisocial behaviour on our streets, but punishing the homeless simply for being homeless is appalling.

In Article

“In recent years we’ve seen local funding for drug and alcohol treatment slashed and support to tackle homelessness cut to the bone. Locking these people up or saddling them with debt they can’t pay will only make the problem worse.”

The PSPO is supported by many businesses in Stoke. Jonathan Bellamy, the chair of the City Centre Partnership, told the Stoke Sentinel: “In recent weeks I have personally witnessed in the city centre: two bottles of vodka smashed on the pavements; a drunken woman clearly out of her mind and damaging the front door of a building in Cheapside while children walked by; and a man urinating outside an empty shop in the Cultural Quarter at two in the afternoon.

“Millions of pounds has been invested in the city centre in recent years by the council and private businesses and thousands of livelihoods depend on this vital piece of our local economy. That should not be undermined by the ill-disciplined, destructive behaviour of a few people.”

The GMB union urged members of the public in Stoke to write to the council to oppose the measure, which is designed to stamp out antisocial behaviour. The council is consulting on the proposal until 15 December and says it is a response to requests from local business people, shoppers and visitors.

It would also criminalise sleeping in public toilets as well as “begging in a manner that is reasonably perceived to be intimidating or a nuisance”.

Stuart Richards, senior organiser at GMB, said: “Cuts to benefits, council funding and a lack of affordable housing have led to a massive increase in the number of people affected by homelessness across the West Midlands.

“We’re not going to solve the issues or causes around this by criminalising or punishing those who end up sleeping on our streets. GMB is asking the people of Stoke to take part in the council’s consultation to help to force a change in this proposal.”

Gareth Snell, the MP for Stoke-on-Trent Central, said: “Stoke-on-Trent’s approach to the homeless is seriously flawed. Fining those who have nowhere to go is unacceptable. But to compound the problem, they now plan to cut support for homelessness services in Stoke-on-Trent by £1m as a result of budget cuts.

In Article 2

“They are failing the very people we should be helping most.”

More than 3,000 people have signed a petition calling on the council to abandon the proposal.

Last year, freedom of information requests by the Vice website discovered that at least 36 local councils in England and Wales “have introduced or are working on PSPOs which criminalise activities linked to homelessness”.

A Stoke-on-Trent city council spokesman said: “No one is being fined for sleeping in a tent. This is a consultation only at this stage, under national public space protection order legislation – powers which a number of authorities up and down the country are already using. A number of options are being considered, aimed at addressing issues of aggressive begging and the kind of antisocial behaviour that all cities face. We’re looking at options because businesses and visitors to the city centre have asked us to. We encourage all feedback before the consultation ends on 15 December.”

“There is a range of support in place to help homeless people in the city. The city council has given one of its buildings to be used as The Macari Centre for homeless people, alongside work in partnership with organisations including Brighter Futures, Salvation Army, YMCA, Voices. We work closely with churches and have launched street chaplains teams to work in the city centre.”

guardian.co.uk © Guardian News & Media Limited 2010

Published via the Guardian News Feed plugin for WordPress.

 

Source : Council proposes £1,000 fines for homeless sleeping in tents : Welfare Weekly


By Rafi Schwartz

President Donald Trump came to the defense of accused pedophile and Alabama Republican senate candidate Roy Moore on Tuesday, offering what was effectively an endorsement of the disgraced former judge.

 Speaking with reporters as he prepared to board Marine One on his way to his Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida, Trump declared, “We don’t need a liberal Democrat in the [Alabama Senate] seat.” He also dismissed the growing list of allegations against Moore, telling reporters, “he denies it,” and criticizing Moore’s Democratic opponent Doug Jones as “soft on crime.”
Jones, in his time as a U.S. Attorney, helped convict two of the Klansmen responsible for the notorious 1963 Birmingham church bombing that killed four young black girls.
Tuesday’s statement marked the first time Trump—who has himself admitted to sexual assault—has spoken on camera about the allegations against Moore. Previously, the White House has insisted that the decision about whether or not Moore was fit for elected office rested entirely in the hands of Alabama voters. Trump did, however, waste little time last week lashing out after Minnesota Senator Al Franken was accused of sexual misconduct. Franken, of course, is a Democrat.

Source : Trump Dismisses the Roy Moore Horror Stories and Effectively Endorses Him for Senate : Splinter


BY JONATHAN EASLEY

Trump risks hypocrisy charges with Franken attack
© Getty

President Trump injected himself into the national debate over sexual harassment again, a risky move that opens Trump up to charges of hypocrisy over his past behavior and his reluctance to rebuke Republicans who have been accused of misconduct.

Trump went after Sen. Al Franken (D-Minn.), after a woman accused the senator of forcibly kissing and groping her.

The woman, a news anchor named Leeann Tweeden, released a photo of Franken leering into the camera and touching her while she slept during a USO trip in 2006. Trump responded over Twitter, saying the picture “speaks a thousand words” and ripping Franken for “lecturing anyone who would listen about sexual harassment and respect for women.”

Trump responded to the Franken allegations, accusing the senator of hypocrisy on sexual harassment issues.

“The Al Frankenstien picture is really bad, speaks a thousand words,” Trump tweeted. “Where do his hands go in pictures 2, 3, 4, 5 & 6 while she sleeps? …..”

Franken, once a rising star on the left who had been considered a potential 2020 Democratic presidential candidate, is suddenly a pariah in liberal circles.

But the blowback against Trump for seeking to capitalize on Franken’s downfall has been just as swift.

Trump’s senior aides and advisers have been swamped with questions about why the president is comfortable attacking Franken when more than a dozen women have made similar accusations about him.

And Trump’s critics are howling about a double-standard, pointing to the infamous “Access Hollywood” tape and noting that the president has stopped short of demanding Alabama Senate candidate Roy Moore (R) drop out of the race amid disturbing allegations that he molested young girls.

“If your moral outrage has been exhausted, Trump always knows how to refuel the tank,” said Andrew Weinstein, a GOP operative and ‘Never Trump’ Republican.

“He has no sense of irony or decency,” Weinstein said. “Rather than tallying hypothetical Franken photos, Trump should be held to account for his scarlet number — the 16 alleged victims of his own sexual misconduct.”

Trump’s tweets have forced the White House to re-litigate the “Access Hollywood” tape, which nearly sunk Trump’s presidential campaign a month before Election Day in 2016. In it, Trump boasts about groping women and about how wealthy, powerful and famous men like himself get away with lewd behavior.

“He was apologetic about [the tape] when it surfaced,” White House legislative director Marc Short said in a Friday interview on CNN. “He apologized to his wife and family and the American people about what he considered locker room behavior. He is not trying to excuse it. That’s different than very visual evidence of what Al Franken did.

“The president is making the case that Al Franken was out condemning Roy Moore and others just a month ago and there is a level of hypocrisy there.”

In the wake of the “Access Hollywood” release, multiple women came forward to accuse Trump of varying degrees of sexual misconduct.

Now the wave of harassment claims against powerful men from Hollywood to Capitol Hill has Trump’s accusers speaking out once again.

People magazine ran a story on Friday quoting several of Trump’s accusers, who said they felt their stories had been ignored since the campaign but that the cascade of new allegations has drawn new attention to their claims.

“It’s been simmering on the stove with the lid on, like a pressure cooker,” Natasha Stoynoff, a writer who accused Trump of forcibly kissing her in 2005, says in the People story. “But now the heat’s on and it’s going to boil and the lid is going to blast off.”

The president has denied the allegations and threatened to sue his accusers during the campaign, although he hasn’t filed any lawsuits against them since becoming president. The White House has said the women are lying.

“The president has spoken about this multiple times throughout the campaign and has denied all of those allegations,” press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said at Friday’s press briefing.

Sanders said she did not know why Trump didn’t follow through with his threatened legal action.

Trump’s attacks against Franken have also been complicated by Moore’s troubles in Alabama.

Most Republicans in Washington have cut ties with Moore in the wake of the allegations of sexual misconduct against him, repulsed by the thought of serving with someone accused of sexually assaulting minors and fearing he’ll tarnish the Republican brand ahead of critical midterm elections.

GOP leaders in Congress have called on Moore to drop out of the race and are openly talking about refusing to seat him if he wins.

The White House has stopped short of calling on Moore to drop out of the race and Trump has been notably quiet on the controversy, raising questions about why Franken’s misdeeds have attracted the president’s attention while Trump has still not commented on Moore.

Sanders vented her frustration with reporters in the briefing room on Friday after the first five questions she fielded pertained to Trump, Franken and Moore. She denied that the president has been silent on the issue, noting that Trump said during his overseas trip that Moore should drop out of the race if the allegations are true.

Sanders also said that Trump supports the Republican National Committee’s decision to stop providing resources to the Moore campaign.

“He has weighed in on Roy Moore,” Sanders said. “He did it while on a foreign trip in Asia. I did it repeatedly yesterday. In fact, I took about 15 questions on that topic … so to suggest that this White House and specifically this president hasn’t weighed in is just inaccurate and wrong.”

Still, Trump’s aides and advisers spent Friday struggling in front of the cameras to answer questions about why Trump is not a hypocrite for attacking Franken.

Sanders argued that the difference between Trump and Franken is that the Minnesota Democrat had admitted to wrongdoing, while Trump has maintained his innocence.

On the issue of Moore, White House adviser Kellyanne Conway said on Fox News Channel that Trump always weighs in on the news of the day — in this case, Franken — while “the Roy Moore story is eight days old.”

Short said on CNN that Trump had already done all he could do to keep Moore out of office by backing his challenger, Sen. Luther Strange (R-Ala.), in the primary.

“The president went down to Alabama and campaigned against Roy Moore,” Short said. “He campaigned for Luther Strange. The president was active in this campaign. He chose a different candidate … since the allegations surfaced, the president — even when he was traveling overseas — put out a statement saying if the allegations are true, he should step aside.”

Trump’s allies insist that they aren’t nervous that the president has made himself vulnerable on the issue. They believe the “Access Hollywood” tape and allegations from women were litigated during the campaign and that voters backed Trump anyway.

“Our enemies are never going to cut us any slack, so you just have to go on the attack and not worry about that,” a Trump campaign adviser said.

 

Source : Trump risks hypocrisy charges with Franken attack : The Hill


A new handbook on direct action, a national day of action on inclusive education, and a call for healthcare professionals to boycott disability benefit assessments were among campaign ideas suggested by disabled activists at a national conference.

The National Disabled People’s Summit saw up to 200 Deaf and disabled activists discussing ways to coordinate the fight against austerity and “reinvigorate” the disabled people’s movement.

Sean McGovern, co-chair of the TUC’s disabled workers’ committee, who chaired the event, said disabled people had not “passively” accepted the attack on their rights and services over the last nine years.

He told the conference that the aim of the event was to bring together Deaf and disabled people from the trade union movement, Deaf and disabled people’s organisations, and grassroots campaigns to “find ways to better pool our knowledge and experiences” and organise joint campaigning.

He said: “We are trying to get together to build our resources together… and hopefully stop fighting battles separately.”

A key part of the event saw disabled people take part in workshops aimed at producing ideas for future campaigning across areas such as accessible transport, inclusive education, independent living and social security.

Other workshops discussed how to develop those campaigns, for example through direct action and protests, trade union organising, and using the law and media.

The conference, at the headquarters of the National Education Union in central London, was funded by unions, and co-organised by the Reclaiming Our Futures Alliance.

Among the ideas suggested were the need for a national strategy and set of principles describing the aims of the disabled people’s movement, and for a new handbook for direct action protests, which would take leads from the activists’ handbook developed by the Disabled People’s Direct Action Network (DAN) and the activist toolkit used by the US disabled people’s grassroots group ADAPT.

The conference heard that there was a need to “spread protest and direct action everywhere”.

Other workshops suggested the need for a national education service that is “inclusive from the top to the bottom”, and called for a national day of action that highlights both the “good things that are happening” in inclusive education and the “threats” it is facing.

On independent living, fears were raised about the reinstitutionalisation of disabled people, particularly concerns about the number of people with learning difficulties being forced into long-stay private hospitals.

There were also calls for a legal right to independent living through a free national independent living service, paid for from general taxation, and for “real choice and control, where disabled people are in control and not professionals or social workers”.

On accessible transport, ideas for campaigns included a focus on the importance of disabled passengers being able to “turn up and go”, which the summit heard was “gradually being phased out” by train companies.

On mental health, there was a call for recognition that all people “contribute to society even if not contributing to profit”, for an emphasis on the “social causes of mental distress”, and for unions “to be able to represent people both working and not working and recognise us all as members of the working class”.

Among the campaign ideas on social security was a challenge to nurses and doctors who are members of the Royal College of Nursing and the British Medical Association, and who carry out disability benefit assessments, to “down tools and not take part” in such testing for ethical reasons.

There were also objections to Labour’s “pause and fix” policy position on universal credit, with activists demanding instead that the line on the government’s new working-age benefits system should be to “stop and scrap” it.

On disability hate crime, there were calls for more to be done to challenge and report such offences and to pursue them with the authorities “because we need charges, convictions and sentencing in order to make people confident to go down this path”.

There was also a call to “find allies in the police, Crown Prosecution Service and local authorities and elsewhere and work with them”, and to develop allies and alliances across different equality strands and build on their past successes, for example in combatting race hate crime.

Other workshops produced calls for international solidarity with disabled migrants and refugees and disabled people facing starvation in other countries; and the need for better training for union representatives, so they can provide improved support for disabled employees.

There was a recognition that cuts to jobs and services mean people are “having to work harder and faster in much more difficult conditions”; a call for regular disability arts protests; and for attention to be paid to the barriers faced by disabled people who are “intersectional”, such as black disabled women, or gay disabled men.

And there was a call for a new hub where disabled people and their organisations could share information and resources, for example on benefit assessments and appeals, as a way of taking action to “increase our knowledge of our rights, but equally importantly how we use that knowledge in our lives”, such as in day-to-day communication with social workers or service-providers or in “big strategic legal action cases”.

Ideas that came out of the workshops will now be collated and worked into a report to be published in the next few months.

News provided by John Pring at www.disabilitynewsservice.com

 

Source : Summit hears calls on direct action, assessment boycotts and hate crime : DisabledGo News


Until everyone accepts that abuse is never acceptable then abusive situations will continue to occur. In a physical action of abuse then any associated injuries are more likely to be noticed, but with verbal, written and on-live abusive situations then injuries could well be invisible, but injuries there will be and in some instances some injuries which there may never be a recovery from.

The actions taken against all abusers should be effective and fit the crime to ensure all prospective abusers know what to expect if they start or continue to be abusive.

But many conduct themselves in accordance with the Children’s Nursery Rhyme ‘Sticks and Stones’ (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sticks_and_Stones) ending as ‘Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never break me.’, but in reality this is far from the truth as words can and in many instances are worse than ‘sticks and stones’ , for broken bones can be mended in time, but not necessarily the invisible ‘hurt from ‘words’.

Verbal and on-line abuse needs to be taken more seriously and all areas where this can occur need to deal with it more effectively, be they employers, retail venues, schools, churches and all other areas.

Govt Newspeak

If Poundland cared about what happened in their stores, they wouldn’t be abusing the jobless by making them work for nothing – Govt Newspeak


Finsbury Park Poundland attack: ‘Staff did nothing to help abused disabled woman’

Image result for images of poundland

A BARGAIN chain store has come under fire after one shopper witnessed a disabled woman get attacked while staff did nothing to help.

Journalist Katharine Quarmby was in Poundland in Finsbury Park last Friday when she saw a mother with a pushchair shouting abuse at a disabled woman.

“I think there was an argument about who was first in the queue for the till,” said Ms Quarmby. “The mum started abusing the woman and told her to lose weight and saying stuff which was unacceptable. It culminated in the woman having to say ‘please stop I’m disabled’. She had a catheter attached to the shopping trolley.”

Ms Quarmby, who works pro bono at the…

View original post 120 more words

SouL SpeakS

He started Writing, The paper started speaking...

Letters of hope from the soul

I'm a sinner saved by Christ and I struggle. This is simply a blog about the struggle that I have. I am hoping it will someday be a blog about how I overcame my struggle with depression and suicidal ideation. (Cause if not that's gonna suck.)

Special Needs Siblings

Together Is All We Need

Live in Victory & Abundance

"Start Winning in your Today."

Govt Newspeak

Just a pleb exposing the cruelty of Neoliberal Governments

Recoup and Conquer

How to stretch a dollar, travel, and more

LD Carers Butty Group

A support group for carers of persons with Learning Disabilities and/or Autism in Sheffield UK

Life Plan

Make Some History

The Godly Chic Diaries

Smiling • Writing • Dreaming

Life with a Bear

Special needs, Complex needs, Non-verbal, wouldn't have him any other way!

Barbra Dozier's Blog

Just another WordPress.com weblog

Charlene Bullard

Believer, Mother, Educator, & Writer

%d bloggers like this: