Archives for category: Finance

The Special Olympics National Games brought in more than a million pounds to Sheffield, council bosses have revealed.

Source: ‘Incredible’ Special Olympics brings in £1.4 million to Sheffield – The Star


More companies are turning to smart machines to save money on slow, expensive human employees. Here’s everything you need know about automation – and what it means for your job.

Source: BBC – Future – How automation will affect you – the experts’ view


Disability rights currently safeguarded by EU legislation may be under threat, while grant funding could be withdrawn without replacement

Source: What does Brexit mean for people with disabilities? | Social Care Network | The Guardian


A social worker discusses the obstacles she faces in securing specialist care for people with autism

Source: ‘I feel embarrassed about the delays in getting care packages’


Funding cuts have pushed children’s social services to “breaking point” with action only being taken to protect youngsters once they are at imminent risk of harm, council leaders warn today. Painting a damning picture of the state of children’s social care, a report from the Local Government Association (LGA) says cuts to early intervention services have led to an “unprecedented surge” in demand for urgent child protection support.

Source: Councils forced to overspend by £600m to protect vulnerable children as cuts push services to ‘breaking point’ | The Independent


It was interesting to watch the sudden spike of interest in social care during the general election campaign. The public debate was welcome, but now the dust has settled what action has actually been taken?

The fallout from the “dementia tax” made it appear as though, for once, social care was being given the same level of priority as the NHS. People were calling for its protection as forcefully as they do our health service.

Since then, a Care Quality Commission report revealed that nearly a fifth of adult social care services have been rated as inadequate or requiring improvement and public sector cuts are thought to be behind a sudden stall in life expectancy. Yet neither of these stories has earned the same degree of public scrutiny or government response as social care did before the election. The interest in social care risks looking like a one-off.

We’ve been promised a green paper, which must address issues such as long-term funding and care worker shortages. What it must not be is false hope, another document that talks about change but offers no real action.

My care home offers specialised services for those living with dementia, so addressing talk of a “dementia tax” is, for us, of particular importance. It’s a sad but true fact that people living with dementia face financial discrimination because of their condition. It is out of their control yet, unlike other diseases, isn’t covered by the NHS. Asking individuals and families to pay for dementia care themselves is unsustainable and wrong.

At the same time, it is only right that the government introduces a cap to keep social care costs down for everyone. A British baby born today can expect to live to 104 years old. The UK is woefully under-prepared for looking after our growing population in older age. Whether it’s scrapping plans for a dementia tax, implementing a sensible care cap or creating a unified health and social care sector, things have to change.

Attention must also be given to the extraordinary people who work in this sector. The team I work with at Anchor’s Cranlea care home in Newcastle are second to none. Despite challenging work, they show commitment, empathy and an ability to deliver the highest quality of care on a daily basis. As care workers, we should be receiving recognition from government, not more cuts that add further pressure.

Source: Now the election is over, politicians have sidelined social care again | Lynn Day | Social Care Network | The Guardian


“My ex-husband fixes cars, and I fix people. Like lots of men he says: ‘I couldn’t do the job you are doing’, but I couldn’t be a car mechanic. So why should he get more money for being a car mechanic and I get less for actually keeping a person independent in their own house?”

The state of social care in the UK has come under increasing scrutiny, with policymakers, commissioners and providers debating the long-term sustainability of services, but an important voice – that of frontline staff – has been largely absent from discussions.

A new book gives an unprecedented insight into the experiences of homecare workers. Based on extensive interviews with staff in the sector, it reveals a proud and skilled workforce who feel underfunded, overstretched and undervalued.

Lydia Hayes, author of Stories of Care: A Labour of Law, argues that the low pay, poor status and lack of respect they experience is due to the fact this workforce is mostly female and working class.

A lecturer in law at Cardiff University, Hayes researches employment law with a focus on the care sector, and as part of her research for the book, and to help give a voice to these workers, she interviewed 30 homecare staff – all working-class women – at length.

“I realised that as a consequence of the sexism and class bias they experience, they are subject to a number of tensions in the way they talk about their work,” she says. “On the one hand, they talk about the work as being incredibly satisfying and worthwhile. On the other, they can talk about it as something which strips their personal dignity, takes away their self-confidence and leaves them in tears at the end of the day.”

Hayes, who hopes her book will be read by politicians, senior managers, trade unions, care campaigners and those involved in social policy development, as well as academics, says care staff are victims of what she terms “institutional humiliation”.

Source: ‘People look at us as cleaners’: care workers feel stretched and undervalued | Social Care Network | The Guardian


The Get Digital Heatmap shows the likelihood of digital exclusion across the UK at local authority level. It uses eight different digital and social metrics to calculate the overall likelihood of exclusion. The heatmap was developed with the Local Government Association and the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), and draws on research from the 2017 Get Digital Skills Survey, also produced in association with Lloyds Banking Group.

Common causes of digital exclusion are lack of skills or the confidence to use them; lack of access to infrastructure and fast broadband; the cost of devices and fees for broadband subscription and mobile data; and a lack of personal motivation to value the gaining digital skills as relevant and important.

 

Source: Get Digital’s new heatmap highlights large areas of digital exclusion across the UK – The Tech Partnership


Congress should pay attention to these four impartial ways to save lives and save money when discussing healthcare.

Source: 4 ideas for drastically reducing health care spending – Business Insider


It signifies an aggressive and prolonged investigation.

Source: Special Counsel Robert Mueller Reportedly Assembles Grand Jury, Ramping Up Russia Probe | HuffPost

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