Archives for category: Finance

Calls are growing for President Trump to release his full tax returns after part of his 2005 return was made public Tuesday. Two pages from Trump’s tax return were obtained by Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist David Cay Johnston of DCReport, who appeared last night on “The Rachel Maddow Show” on MSNBC. The 2005 tax return shows Trump earned $153 million—or more than $400,000 a day. Trump paid out $36.6 million in federal income taxes, much of it in the form of what’s known as the alternative minimum tax, which Trump now wants to eliminate. On Wednesday morning, President Trump tweeted, “Does anybody really believe that a reporter, who nobody ever heard of, ‘went to his mailbox’ and found my tax returns? @NBCNews FAKE NEWS!” That’s despite the fact that the White House confirmed the authenticity of the documents Tuesday, after Maddow teased the scoop. For more, we speak with Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist David Cay Johnston, who obtained part of Trump’s 2005 tax returns.

Source: David Cay Johnston Speaks Out About Receiving & Revealing 2 Pages of Trump’s 2005 Tax Returns | Democracy Now!


Regional care providers are urging their local authorities to ensure extra money announced in the budget actually gets through to frontline care services.

Source: Call to local authorities to ensure extra social care money gets to frontline | Care Industry News



Good management of a charity’s finances and other assets enables it to succeed in delivering its charitable aims.

To achieve this, trustees must properly supervise their resources and satisfy themselves that they have:

  • realistic funding plans and strategies
  • effective management controls and systems
  • planned for their charity’s assets and resources to be used in the best possible way for their beneficiaries

Getting this right can be very rewarding. It shows the valuable and visible results of a trustee’s commitment to their charity, beneficiaries and supporters. The Commission recognises the commitment that this requires of trustees, and the challenges they can face in serving their charities well. Trustees can delegate tasks to suitably qualified staff and/or volunteers but, whatever the arrangements, proper oversight and monitoring are vital.

Charities vary greatly in size, scale and how they operate and so trustees must decide what is reasonable, proportionate and appropriate for their charity. While common legal duties apply to all charities, how trustees interpret good practice will depend on individual circumstances.

As the charity regulator, the Commission expects trustees to take their responsibilities seriously. Trustees are not expected to be perfect – they are expected to do their best to comply with their duties. The Commission recognises that most trustees are volunteers who sometimes make honest mistakes: where they have acted honestly and reasonably, they are generally protected under the law.

 

Source: *Charity finances: trustee essentials – GOV.UK

*Contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0.


I agree that social care and related health should be administered by one just one authority, but should it be health or social services or should a completely new authority be formed.

As to whether independent social care providers are profiteering from the system I am not too sure for to have quality care does cost.

If Andy Burnham is stating that these social care providers should be run by either social services or health rather than independently, this I would seriously contest. The reason being than generally the most expensive providers are run by these authorities as the lowest paid would generally be paid no less than the Living Wage as opposed to the National Living Wage, their pensions would generally be better as these may still be based on final salaries as to contribution as is the newly created work portable pensions which are being rolled out to all employees who are currently not in a pensionable employment.

The management structures will generally be more expensive to run than in a private provider, but this would depend on the extent of the profit being extracted by the owners from their care company. But with the current state of social services and health finances due to Government austerity cuts the scope for excessive profits are being restrictive.

With regards to zero hours contracts and I agree that they should not used in practice, Local Authorities do use these for some of their workforce, but I am not sure about health.

What should be occurring is zero contracts should be outlawed, everyone should be paid at least the Living wage, which would make the National Living wage redundant. In addition retain the independent providers, but insist on a effective quality control system, which should be independently monitored outwith the care provider, be they independent, Local Authority or health.

There are currently local independent HealthWatch organisation in all localities who do, at present, monitor Care home, GP surgeries, Pharmacies, Dentists and Opticians. Their remit should be extended to day services and all other care providers and their powers should be strengthened, for at present they can not insist to look at records kept by the respective organisations, unless the organisations offer them to the Enter and View representatives. Also they can only state recommendations, but these should be extended to be more than voluntary for the care providers to follow them.

Then the HealthWatch visits would be more on a par to the CQC (Care Quality Commission) inspections.


While at first glance this appears to be another hare-brained idea and certainly would be if Government (taxpayers) money was to be used both for its initial purchase and then for its sustainability (running costs).

However, if money was forthcoming from the businesses that would benefit from an increase in trade, then that could be a different matter.

However, as that would be extremely unlikely to occur I therefore concur with the previous comments that it will be a waste of money and another foolish and expensive idea from the Boris, as it would be dead in the water, like a lead balloon. However, it could be crewed by the Cabinet and they could go down with the Yacht, although there are less expensive ways to be Cabinet rid.


The unpredictable novice in the White House is making emerging markets seem less dangerous by comparison, say strategists like Goldman Sachs Group Inc.’s Kamakshya Trivedi.

Source: Investors Are Betting Against Trump’s Trade War – Bloomberg


Frexit, Grexit or jitters about Quitaly – existential threats to the euro are remote but investors are still looking for clever ways to protect themselves against the risk of a euro dropout.

Pricing in arcane reaches of bond markets and elsewhere shows investors are not taking chances.

Headlines have focused on France, where far-right candidate Marine Le Pen has promised to take France out of the euro zone in the event she surprises and wins the presidential election.

 

Source: What if the euro imploded? Six trade ideas | Reuters


Labour’s economic plans have come under fire after one of Jeremy Corbyn’s closest allies struggled to explain how the party would fund its proposed £63bn of spending on public services. Rebecca Long-Bailey, the shadow Business Secretary, was repeatedly asked during a live television interview how her party could raise the money without breaking its promise not to increase borrowing.

Source: Rebecca Long-Bailey struggles to explain how Labour would fund £63bn on public services – The i newspaper online iNews


With so much focus in recent months on the scientifically discredited notion that childhood vaccines cause autism, the real threats to health care and services for people with autism and other disabilities aren’t being given enough attention, argue two leading health policy experts.

“President Donald Trump’s apparent openness to a long-debunked link between vaccines and autism risks encouraging Americans to stop vaccinating their children, posing a serious public health threat,” the researchers write in the March 9 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. “Meanwhile, renewed attention to disproven theories about autism may be distracting us from growing threats to essential policies that support the health and well-being of people with autism or other disabilities.

 

Source: Don’t be distracted: The real issues in autism are threats to funding, services, say experts — ScienceDaily

discoveringsooz

I refuse to be fat forever

Disability Eye

Life, Stories, News and Challenges of living in the UK with a disability.

PROMOTING POSITIVE PARTNERSHIP WORKING

HNC/HND Health and Social Care

Black Leadership Analysis

This is an unofficial Spiral Dynamics blog. It is not endorsed by D. Beck PhD.

Invisible Illnesses

Awareness, Education, Research & Quips

Henny Kupferstein

Official Webpage

The Pensives

"The truth is like poetry, and most people hate poetry."

JONATHAN TURLEY

Res ipsa loquitur ("The thing itself speaks")

Al ritmo político

En sintonía con la realidad

Josep Goded

Seeking Truth

Stop MP lies & corruption

When MPs give a reason for wanting something - it's an excuse to suit their own endgame.

nalinidesignprofile

Graphic Designer

The Aussie Conservative Blog

Paleoconservative news and opinion

Eating Disorders

My journey through it all

Muslim Statistics

Muslim immigration and Muslim statistics

Big Love Foundation

Our mission is to use the most ethical and positive business practices in order to EMPOWER, ENHANCE, and ENRICH the lives of individuals with disabilities, inspiring them to reach their full potential! Knowing that every day is better than the next, if you believe in yourself and your ability...not your disability!

BayArt

New Perspective on Life

%d bloggers like this: