Morning Call: Can’t We Strike a Deal? | The New Statesman


To strike or not to strike, well that is the question. But, is it easy to answer for it all depends on who you believe, for it could be that each party is exaggerating the areas in question.

It is true that inflation has begun to rise, now 9.1% from the similar period last year, so say, a 3% salary increase would be, in real terms’ a wage cut. It is also said that due to COVID and persons working from home there has been a reduction in rail travel of say, 20% and by striking this reduction could well increase and be hard to recover, especially in the short term.

The government could do more for all UK workers by bringing in tax cuts to Income tax, thereby increasing net pay, by reducing the rate of VAT, which would reduce, to some extent, the costs of goods and services, but would mean there would be less revenue for the Government, thereby to recover this shortfall some Government spending could have to reduced, which could lead to some services being reduced, especially those funding by Local Authorities, as, to a large extent the Government funds Local Authorities. But there are other services and organisations which are funded by the Government, including the Police, the armed services, the NHS, etc., so funding could have to be cut to these organisations and services.

With the railways some alterations to working conditions could be a solution to save on costs and release more money for salaries, as there are some restrictive practices. Some of these are relating to work processes before modernisations or automations were made, such as ticket machines instead of ticket booking offices. But the Unions appear to be against alterations affecting the reductions in the workforce due to these modernisations and automations, so staff are effectively having less to do. There are also possible future automations, such as driverless trains, automated track inspections, automated signaling and others.

But there is something which has not been mentioned to any large degree and that is the large pay gap from the lowest paid workers to that of the highest paid workers, of which the highest would be the Chief Executives, so the highest paid could have there salaries restricted to a certain percentage increase above that of the lowest paid.

Much needs to be looked at and nothing should be off the table, including compulsory arbitration on all parties, with strikes being not required.

Source: Morning Call: Can’t We Strike a Deal? – The New Statesman

MPs ask Coffey why she is hiding nine secret DWP reports – Disability News Service


MPs have asked the work and pensions secretary to justify her refusal to release nine potentially embarrassing reports about her department’s work, at least four of which focus on disabled claimant…

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Transparency, honesty, accountability and trust should be there in every aspect of public organisation governess, but the opposites non-transparency, dishonesty, unaccountability and distrust are usually evident in many instances.

This is so proving the case in respect of the DWP and certainly, it appears, with the Work and Pensions Secretary Therese Coffey MP.

This is all on top of the spectacle of ‘Partygate‘,  so it appears many elements of this Government are unwilling to abide by the concepts of transparency, honesty, accountability and trust and many within the UK feel this will never change.

The ‘House‘ needs to ensure that change will occur and be sustained, but will it, for no previous UK Government has abided by these concepts to any large extent, if at all, irrespective of which Party formed the Government.

Is it that ‘power’ corrupts or were there leanings to corruption to start with.

But this is not just confined to the UK and many would say that the degree of corruption is much more evident in some other countries than the UK, but that should not be seen as good for everyone deserves better. The ‘House’ should be doing all it can to ‘cleanse’ itself, rather than spending so much time doing the opposite.

So, I support Stephen Timms MP, chair of the Commons work and pensions committee and his colleagues and also the DNS.

Source: MPs ask Coffey why she is hiding nine secret DWP reports – Disability News Service

Rules to be relaxed for foreign teachers to work in schools in England | Teacher training | The Guardian


Change will allow teachers around the world with equivalent qualifications and experience to apply for jobs

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So we are changing the rules to allow more teachers to come to the UK so they can teach in UK schools, but it is nothing new that was is and was a shortage of teachers for its been known for years. However, we lets is get to a crisis and still wait, until it gets to a major crisis and then action is taken noy for them to come immediately but next year, so crisis continues to increase.

But teaching is not the only profession in a supply of workers crisis, includes the NHS, agriculture, lorry drivers, hospitality, care workers and many more, but the rules are not changed for every profession.

Money in many of these is an additional problem and has been for years, but successive previous Governments have done nothing except ignore the situation, causing many more problems.

The gap between those who have and those that don’t is forever increasing, but these |Governments are only concerned with those who have and in many instances have very much more than any others, as many in these Governments are in the category of those who have very much more.

For the UK to thrive everyone needs to be recognised and more given to those who have not, even if it means taking off those who have.

Source: Rules to be relaxed for foreign teachers to work in shools in England | Teacher training | The Guardian

Streeting ‘manoeuvre’ backfires as he apologises to Shadow Cab for BACKING rail strikes on Question Time – SKWAWKBOX


Diseased nature of Labour regime under Starmer and the right couldn’t be clearer U-turn: Wes Streeting has apologised to colleagues in the Labour party for backing rail strikers – to th…

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Streeting as come out of the ‘closet’ and shown his true colours as a person who can’t be trusted. Now does that mean he can’t be a new leader, for, these days, who does trust a politician of any party and this was well before the example of Boris Johnson, he just strengthens the view of mistrust.

Also as he appears to be a supporter of private health care, so, if Labour do get to be in power will the NHS be safe in his hands.

 

Source: Streeting ‘manoeuvre’ backfires as he apologises to Shadow Cab for BACKING rail strikes on Question Time – SKWAWKBOX

Minister promises “increased transparency” to build trust in GP patient data scheme | The BMJ


The government has said it is at a loss to explain why there was such opposition to its GP patient data scheme last year but has vowed to win back support with revised plans that are due to be announced soon.

MPs on the House of Commons Science and Technology Committee quizzed government ministers about NHS data sharing as part of an evidence session held on 8 June for their inquiry into digital data and right to privacy.

The GP Data for Planning and Research (GPDPR) programme was launched in spring 2021, but around 1.5 million people opted out of the scheme over concerns about security and access to data, …

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This is, mainly down to trust and with past experience who really trusts Governments and any public body, yes, they promise, but how often are these promises broken and at time is there any real intension to keep a promise, is it just something to say at the time.

Politicians are generally regarded as untrustworthy and in many instances with just reason.

In many instances it is like an apology for apologies are uttered and tossed out many times these days and no one knows if the apology is truly given or is it just something to say.

Trust has to be earned and trust can be long standing and then lost by one mistake or very poor action and then take much time for trust to be regained, if ever.

Sincerity is a must, but many are very insincere, as power is used as a tool to gain the upper hand, so, less use of power and more of sincerity and trust.

 

Source: Minister promises “increased transparency” to build trust in GP patient data scheme | The BMJ

GPs criticise “appalling” decision to extend Capita’s primary care contract | The BMJ


NHS England and Improvement (NHSEI) has extended Capita’s Primary Care Support England (PSCE) contract for an additional three years, in a move worth £94m.1The announcement, made by the outsourcing company, means Capita will continue to provide digital, logistical, and support services for all of NHS England’s primary care practitioners (GPs, dentists, opticians, and pharmacists) until 31 August 2025.In the announcement, Capita said it has made a number of improvements since it took over the contract in 2015, including “standardising primary care processes nationally and launching the PCSE Online platform.” Additionally, it said it has “developed strong relationships with NHSEI and other stakeholders to enhance the PCSE service.”

Capita’s public service chief executive Al Murray said the contract …

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I am not at all surprised that GPs are applaud that Capita have retained this contract, as the process of awarding contracts needs to be drastically and urgently looked at.

I assume this was done through some form of the ‘tender’ process, which is mainly a paper exercise, where prior knowledge is not considered. in reality all information should be considered. However, it is a somewhat open process as all decisions made can be challenged by the organisations being considered, so if there needs to be evidence on how decisions are being made, to include non-evidenced opinions can’t be allowed.

What needs to be practiced more is accountability and transparency, so that past history can be included where there is factual evidence available. But, in many instances there is no real factual evidence just an assessors opinion from non-proved incidents. So, when poor practice is brought to notice, these all need to be investigated and the evidence forthcoming used as evidence in the tender process.

But, in my experience very few incidents of poor practice are investigated or when they are not fully investigated. While not proved are the holding organisation, especially public bodies, such as the DWP, part of the poor practice as much public opinion believes, especially in benefit assessments.

This leads to distrust of all organisations involved and when distrust arises it is extremely difficult to overcome, so in all instances there needs to be openness, honesty and above all transparency, a lot of which is not evident in this and many other systems and processes.

 

 

Source: GPs criticise “appalling” decision to extend Capita’s primary care contract | The BMJ

There’s a simple way to fight the cost of living emergency: a £15 an hour minimum wage | Nadia Whittome | The Guardian


Opponents say this will lead to a wage-price spiral – but that’s an argument that’s stuck in the 1970s, says Labour MP Nadia Whittome

 

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I do agree that the minimum wage should be around £15 per hour, but not for other salaries to be increased in the same ratio as this would lead to a wages spiral.

But in saying it should be £15 per hour, this will not be a major problem for many industries, especially multi-nationals, but it will be for charities and certainly the care profession.

The care profession has been starved of finance for way too long, well before 2010, when austerity measures were introduced, but these measures made the finance much worse. So the Government needs to finance Local Authorities much better and return all the losses they endured through the austerity cuts.

As for charities, with all the problems with the cost of living, donations to charities have been considerably reduced, meaning many charities are having to decide whether they can continue let alone afford a minimum wage of £15 per hour. Without charities the gaps caused by lack of statutory services will only get greater thereby causing even more difficulties for the vulnerable that charities look after.

Also Chief Executives of industry needs to have their salaries capped so they are not earning more 10/15% more than their lowest earning employee.

Source: There’s a simple way to fight the cost of living emergency: a £15 an hour minimum wage | Nadia Whittome | The Guardian

£11.8bn of taxpayers’ money lost to fraud due to flaws in Tories’ Covid support schemes | Morning Star


Average of £420 per household lost, the equivalent of more than a month’s worth of food.

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Yes, taxpayers money was lost to fraud, but if forward planning by many previous Governments had been in force in the preceding years there would have been no need to spend this money in the first place. Lets hope lessons have been learned, but I have great doubts that they have been.

Source: £11.8bn of taxpayers’ money lost to fraud due to flaws in Tories’ Covid support schemes | Morning Star

Government says it’s too costly to give disabled people in fire risk blocks evacuation plans – The Big Issue


Campaigners say they are “devastated” after ministers rejected recommendations made following inquiry into the Grenfell fire

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Everyone should be equal, but some are more equal than others as finance is a prime factor in creating equality when it shouldn’t be, as needs should be the main factor within any legislation to combat discrimination.

Disability discrimination was supposed to be dealt with through the Disability Discrimination Act 1995, amended by the Disability Discrimination Act 2005 and then replaced by the Equality Act 2010,

but written into these acts was the proviso, that  if adjustments were to be seen to be unreasonable then the adjustments did not need to be proceeded with and exorbitant costs were one of those provisos.

This could well be the reason for the rejected recommendations in the case of the Grenfell fire. But should costs be, really a reason to make safety not equal.

In building regulations these should be there to protect and when, especially, these regulations were not abided by, then, irrespective of costs all actions and recommendations should be carried through and make those who were at fault accountable.

 

Source: Government says it’s too costly to give disabled people in fire risk blocks evacuation plans – The Big Issue

Cost of living crisis: Minister says people could ‘take on more hours’ at work or move to a ‘better paid job’ to protect themselves from cost of living surge | Politics News | Sky News


Labour said the comments by safeguarding minister Rachel Maclean were “disconnected from the realities of people’s lives” after she said the government has “already taken action to help people with energy bills and there’s more help coming”.

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Yes, safeguarding minister Rachel Maclean, action was taken, but it was too little and the help that is supposed to be coming is too late.

As to working longer or getting a better paid job, shows just how little Rachel Maclean knows, for most people will not get more pay for working longer and better paid jobs don’t grow on trees for we are not all Government ministers on large salaries, with expenses.

We are in crisis one of many different crisis’s all of which this Government is not helping with.

This minister and all others should come down from their pinnacles and see how the majority of us live.

 

Source: Cost of living crisis: Minister says people could ‘take on more hours’ at work or move to a ‘better paid job’ to protect themselves from cost of living surge | Politics News | Sky News