Archives for category: housing

More than half of British people believe that the Windrush scandalhas shone a light on deeper problems in the immigration system, a new poll has revealed.

The exclusive survey for The Independent indicated that a majority also want an inquiry into the debacle, which saw British citizens wrongly threatened with deportation by immigration officials.

Immigration remains a divisive issue as large numbers of people still believe the UK has a serious problem with illegal migrants, with some 40 per cent showing support for “hostile environment” policies blamed for the scandal.

 

Source: Majority of British people believe Windrush scandal has shone a light on deeper problems in immigration system, new poll reveals | The Independent

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A high court judge has criticised the home secretary, Sajid Javid, for failing to provide safe and suitable accommodation for a vulnerable disabled man after his release from detention.

The 44-year-old man, who uses a wheelchair following a stroke and is legally defined as lacking mental capacity, could not get into accommodation provided by the Home Office on Wednesday night because it had steps and nobody answered the door.

The confused man was forced to wait in the street. Later, he was driven around London for part of the night by the taxi driver who brought him to the address after his release from detention. He was placed in a hostel as a temporary measure.

The disabled man was initially supposed to be released from detention six weeks ago but the Home Office continued to detain him as they were unable to identify suitable, wheelchair-accessible accommodation.

 

Source: Home Office criticised for giving wheelchair user accommodation with steps : Welfare Weekly


This article titled “New homelessness act fails to address root causes, charities say” was written by Patrick Butler Social policy editor, for theguardian.com on Tuesday 3rd April 2018 15.23 UTC

Spiralling rents, welfare reforms and council funding cuts will undermine the impact of the most significant new homelessness legislation for 40 years, charities have said.

There is consensus among campaigners and local authorities that the Homelessness Reduction Act, which came into force on Tuesday and imposes legal duties on English councils to take positive steps to prevent and relieve homelessness, is a welcome and positive move.

 However, there are fears that the act imposes costly new duties on councils at a time when they face drastic funding cuts, and does nothing to confront the underlying factors driving homelessness such as housing benefit cuts, lack of affordable housing and insecure private sector tenancies.

 

Source: New homelessness act fails to address root causes, charities say : Welfare Weekly


There are many comments blaming one thing and another, when this is a problem of many areas.

Lack of funding is certainly one, but not the only one, neither is immigration, work opportunities on a non-livable wage, political interference from all quarters the left, the right and even the centre.

Cuts to any area will create even further problems as the resources will be diminishing and still need to cover the same total area. Problems will occur, which should need more resources, but from where, so the scant resources are then spread even more thinly.

The time as come, many times, when we should all be working together to solve what is before us and party political squabbles with not only all parties, but even within the same parties is not the answer.

We need to be working for the good for the whole instead of the few, as this only creates even more problems and differences.

Being any colour, religion, status, gender, etc should not be a problem as the state of the country should be a matter to us all and we all need to be working together to solve the problem for each and everyone of us.

ukgovernmentwatch

The Downing Street Tools

https://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/940897/London-murders-Sadiq-Khan-budget-cuts-theresa-may-knife-crime

Lancastrian
If the Police desert areas, low life, violence and extortion move in. That was the reason for Peel’s Peelers – the forerunners to the Police – and it is still valid now.

Sadiq’s been in office for nearly two years – about time he started exercising his powers on the street rather than pontificating politically.

pfbulmer
First London has to be made safe, then the social problems that are causing this have to be solved. At the moment what is the Mayor of London doing about this? Absolutely nothing but blaming every-one else !!

timjones
just goes to show ‘mayors’ are and always have been a pathetic concept.

Mr.Always-Right – > timjones
Like Boris Johnson wasting 40 million on the failed garden bridge.

MaBaker
Khan can stop Twittering to Trump and get on with his job.
He can start by NOT closing down police…

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This is just a start as Social care throughout the UK is in an extensive crisis and all, some more than others, are in a dire need of extra finance just to tread water, let alone cater for the increase in needs relating to social care from an ever increasing amount of people both children and adults and their respective carers.

If the Care Industry is allowed to collapse, which it is now and in some instances beyond crisis point, then we will be back in Victorian Times, a time when many Tories regal at in their wish to return to ‘Victorian values’. Are these values we wish to return to, extensive child labour, lack of sanitation, workhouse, penalizing the poor, disabled and the sick.

Just a moment, we may already be there.

Govt Newspeak

The Tories performed a huge u-turn on the last day before Parliament breaks up for Easter.

Welfare secretary Esther McVey has scrapped rules introduced by George Osborne blocking 18-21 year olds from claiming housing benefit. When it was introduced, officials said the plan would stop them “slipping straight into a life on benefits”.

A benefit cut the Tories forced through despite huge protests is only hitting 30 people a month

They said it would hit 1,000 people in its first year and save taxpayers £105million by 2020. But the first official figures since the policy launched, released in January, show it denied benefits to just 90 people in the whole country in its first three months.

The number was so low because ministers drew up a huge list of exceptions to the cut to head off criticism from charities, campaigners and Labour. Today, the government finally caved in and announced the policy…

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The ‘drowned villages’ which were abandoned and flooded by an enormous reservoir will be seen for the first time in 75 years.

Derwent and Ashopton have been digitally rebuilt by students, and a cache of rarely seen photographs will be displayed only a few miles from where the villages once stood.

The villages, which are now under the 27.8 million cubic metres of water in Ladybower Reservoir in Derbyshire, will also be remembered by the few remaining former residents.

Their memories will form another part of the photographic exhibition.

 

Source: Abandoned ‘drowned villages’ digitally rebuilt 75 years after flooding


The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) has breached freedom of information laws by refusing to explain how its new universal credit system of working-age benefits will affect disabled people.

Campaigners have been warning that the introduction of universal credit will see tens or even hundreds of thousands of disabled people with high support needs lose out on thousands of pounds a year because the new system will scrap the disability premiums that exist in the current system.

Both severe (£62.45 per week) and enhanced disability premiums (£15.90 per week) are currently added to some means-tested disability benefits to help with the costs of disability.

The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) has been insisting since 2012 that “transitional protection” would ensure that no-one moving onto universal credit would see their benefits cut in cash terms.

But campaigners have remained sceptical, while also pointing out that the transitional protections will not apply if there are any changes in the disabled person’s personal circumstances – for example if they move to a new home, or their relationship status changes – and will not apply to new claimants.

And last month, a terminally-ill man, TP, won permission for a judicial review of the financial impact of the introduction of universal credit on disabled people with high support needs, through the loss of the two premiums.

According to his lawyers, the removal of the premiums has seen TP lose £178 each month after he moved back to London to receive treatment and had to claim universal credit (UC) for the first time.

 

Source: DWP ignores freedom of information laws in bid to hide universal credit impact | DisabledGo News and Blog


Where is the ‘Duty of Care’, pending Safeguarding issues and many other aspects, we now see the true values of this Tory Government and persons with disabilities are now no longer valued.

Same Difference

Life began at 40 for severely learning-disabled Colleen say her sisters, when she moved into her own home.

She is living happily in her Coventry house, 11 years after leaving unsuitable residential care, thanks to a carefully-crafted network of 24-hour care and a range of state benefits.

But due to the impending removal of the housing part of her support, known as Support for Mortgage Interest (SMI), that security has been mired in uncertainty and anxiety.

Colleen is one of 124,000 households in England who receive this particular benefit.

It helps them repay the interest on their mortgages and nearly half the recipients are pensioners.

However, within weeks the benefit will be axed and a loan offered instead.

Those who have not signed up to the new government scheme face losing their mortgage support.

Though small, the current funding arrangement makes enough difference to enable Colleen to live on…

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Govt Newspeak

Exclusive: Families forced to spend nights in A&E waiting rooms, night buses and police stations after being denied emergency housing by local councils

Vulnerable children are being forced into homelessness because local authorities are routinely flouting child protection laws, lawyers and charities have warned.

Families with young children have been denied emergency accommodation by their local council and subsequently forced out onto the streets, spending nights in A&E waiting rooms, night buses and police stations.

Under the laws set out in the Children’s Act, local authorities are legally obliged to provide accommodation for minors, to prevent vulnerable children ending up on the streets.

But London charity Project 17, which works to end destitution among migrant children, said councils were effectively ignoring the law and often complying only after legal action was taken. It claimed that, of the scores of families it had supported that had initially been denied housing in the past year across the capital, around 90 per…

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It’s a little after 3pm in Detroit’s 8 Mile neighbourhood, and the cicadas are buzzing loudly in the trees. Children weave down the pavements on bicycles, while a pickup basketball game gets under way in a nearby park. The sky is a deep blue with only a hint of an approaching thunderstorm – in other words, a muggy, typical summer Sunday in Michigan’s largest city.

“8 Mile”, as the locals call it, is far from the much-touted economic “renaissance” taking place in Detroit’s centre. Tax delinquency and debt are still major issues, as they are in most places in the city. Crime and blight exist side by side with carefully trimmed hedgerows and mowed lawns, a patchwork that changes from block to block. In many ways it resembles every other blighted neighbourhood in the city – but with one significant difference. Hidden behind the oak-lined streets is an insidious piece of history that most Detroiters, let alone Americans, don’t even know exists: a half mile-long, 5ft tall concrete barrier that locals simply call “the wall”.

“Growing up, we didn’t know what that wall was for,” says Teresa Moon, president of the 8 Mile Community Organization. “It used to be a rite of passage to walk on top of the wall, like a balancing beam. You know, just kids having fun, that kind of thing. It was only later when I found out what it was for, and when I realised the audacity that they had to build it.”

 

Source: Roads to nowhere: how infrastructure built on American inequality : The Guardian

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