Donald Trump’s niece says president is dangerous and calls on him to resign | US news | The Guardian


Mary Trump, whose bombshell book was published Tuesday, tells ABC that the country is ‘on a precipice’

Source: Donald Trump’s niece says president is dangerous and calls on him to resign | US news | The Guardian

Read more

Mary Trump’s book: eight of its most shocking claims about the president

Trump’s niece condemns him as having the maturity of a 3-year-old in brutal new excerpt – Alternet.org


Despite efforts by members of the Trump family and their allies to prevent Mary L. Trump’s new tell-all book from being released, it looks like the book will be coming out sooner than previously expected. According to CNN’s Brian Stelter, Simon & Schuster has announced that the release date for

Source: Trump’s niece condemns him as having the maturity of a 3-year-old in brutal new excerpt – Alternet.org

Donald Trump and family go to court to STOP niece’s book | Daily Mail Online


Donald Trump and his siblings attempted to ask a New York court to grant a temporary restraining order against their niece Mary Trump to stop her book which will lift the lid on their fractured family.

Source: Donald Trump and family go to court to STOP niece’s book | Daily Mail Online

Sarah Sanders lied again and again for Trump. Now she’s got her teeth into John Bolton | Arwa Mahdawi | Opinion | The Guardian


The former White House press secretary has a memoir in the works. But let’s not forget her talent for fiction, writes Arwa Mahdawi

Source: Sarah Sanders lied again and again for Trump. Now she’s got her teeth into John Bolton | Arwa Mahdawi | Opinion | The Guardian

Schiff rips Barr for using DOJ to protect Trump from Bolton book : MSNBC


Rep. Adam Schiff talks with Ali Velshi about the revelations in John Bolton’s new book, Bill Barr’s efforts to use threats from the DOJ to protect Donald Trump from embarrassment, and how Bolton’s testimony would have aided in the impeachment of Trump.

Source: Schiff rips Barr for using DOJ to protect Trump from Bolton  : MSNBC

Trump signs executive order targeting social media companies – CNNPolitics


President Donald Trump signed an executive order targeting social media companies on Thursday, days after Twitter called two of his tweets “potentially misleading.”

Source: Trump signs executive order targeting social media companies – CNNPolitics

Journalism’s Assange problem : THe Conversation


These days, anybody with an internet connection can be a publisher.

That doesn’t make everybody a journalist.

This distinction has become more important than ever in light of two recent events.

One was the arrest of WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange. The other was a proposal by lawmakers from Georgia, the Peach State, that looked more like an export from the Georgia that was part of the Soviet Union: a so-called “ethics in journalism” act that would have imposed onerous new requirements and potential civil penalties on reporters.

As soon as news broke of Assange’s potential extradition to the United States for trial on charges of conspiracy, his allies began campaigning to make him a Fourth Estate martyr.

“Every journalist in the world” should be speaking out on Assange’s behalf, said Intercept editor Glenn Greenwald. Another fugitive leaker of U.S. government secrets, Edward Snowden, tweeted that Assange’s arrest represents “a dark day for press freedom.”

As two journalism professors who practiced the craft for many years before becoming teachers of it, we know firsthand how powerfully reporters are drawn to unpopular causes. It’s an admirable reflex that often makes for great journalism and a better society.

But granting Assange journalist status is beyond problematic: It’s likely to draw more attacks on press freedom such as the Georgia lawmakers’ thinly disguised attempt to sanction and ostracize journalists whose work they don’t like.

 

Source: Journalism’s Assange problem  : The Conversation

The EU has approved a controversial overhaul of copyright laws – MIT Technology Review


European Union member states will now have two years to work out how to put the laws into action within their own countries.

What’s happened: The European Parliament voted the measures through by 348 to 278.

Why controversial? Two specific provisions have come in for criticism. Article 11 will let news organizations collect more fees from aggregators like Facebook and Google. Article 13 would require web giants to automatically filter copyrighted material, such as songs or videos, unless they have been specifically licensed. Although vaguely worded, both sections will require tech companies to do a lot more to police content on their platforms.

A showdown: The run-up to the law has seen two sides line up to fight it out. The music industry and big publishers are in favor. The opposing side includes the tech giants, but also a large grassroots movement that says the law will damage free expression online.

But some compromise: The proposals have been watered down from their original form to address some of the concerns raised by companies like Google, which had threatened to drop its news service in Europe over Article 11 (which it called a “link tax”). However, opponents are still far from happy with the new law.

 

Source: The EU has approved a controversial overhaul of copyright laws – MIT Technology Review