Morning Call: Can’t We Strike a Deal? | The New Statesman


To strike or not to strike, well that is the question. But, is it easy to answer for it all depends on who you believe, for it could be that each party is exaggerating the areas in question.

It is true that inflation has begun to rise, now 9.1% from the similar period last year, so say, a 3% salary increase would be, in real terms’ a wage cut. It is also said that due to COVID and persons working from home there has been a reduction in rail travel of say, 20% and by striking this reduction could well increase and be hard to recover, especially in the short term.

The government could do more for all UK workers by bringing in tax cuts to Income tax, thereby increasing net pay, by reducing the rate of VAT, which would reduce, to some extent, the costs of goods and services, but would mean there would be less revenue for the Government, thereby to recover this shortfall some Government spending could have to reduced, which could lead to some services being reduced, especially those funding by Local Authorities, as, to a large extent the Government funds Local Authorities. But there are other services and organisations which are funded by the Government, including the Police, the armed services, the NHS, etc., so funding could have to be cut to these organisations and services.

With the railways some alterations to working conditions could be a solution to save on costs and release more money for salaries, as there are some restrictive practices. Some of these are relating to work processes before modernisations or automations were made, such as ticket machines instead of ticket booking offices. But the Unions appear to be against alterations affecting the reductions in the workforce due to these modernisations and automations, so staff are effectively having less to do. There are also possible future automations, such as driverless trains, automated track inspections, automated signaling and others.

But there is something which has not been mentioned to any large degree and that is the large pay gap from the lowest paid workers to that of the highest paid workers, of which the highest would be the Chief Executives, so the highest paid could have there salaries restricted to a certain percentage increase above that of the lowest paid.

Much needs to be looked at and nothing should be off the table, including compulsory arbitration on all parties, with strikes being not required.

Source: Morning Call: Can’t We Strike a Deal? – The New Statesman

There’s a simple way to fight the cost of living emergency: a £15 an hour minimum wage | Nadia Whittome | The Guardian


Opponents say this will lead to a wage-price spiral – but that’s an argument that’s stuck in the 1970s, says Labour MP Nadia Whittome

 

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I do agree that the minimum wage should be around £15 per hour, but not for other salaries to be increased in the same ratio as this would lead to a wages spiral.

But in saying it should be £15 per hour, this will not be a major problem for many industries, especially multi-nationals, but it will be for charities and certainly the care profession.

The care profession has been starved of finance for way too long, well before 2010, when austerity measures were introduced, but these measures made the finance much worse. So the Government needs to finance Local Authorities much better and return all the losses they endured through the austerity cuts.

As for charities, with all the problems with the cost of living, donations to charities have been considerably reduced, meaning many charities are having to decide whether they can continue let alone afford a minimum wage of £15 per hour. Without charities the gaps caused by lack of statutory services will only get greater thereby causing even more difficulties for the vulnerable that charities look after.

Also Chief Executives of industry needs to have their salaries capped so they are not earning more 10/15% more than their lowest earning employee.

Source: There’s a simple way to fight the cost of living emergency: a £15 an hour minimum wage | Nadia Whittome | The Guardian

Taxi Wheelchair Refusals Leave Users Vulnerable | Same Difference


A wheelchair user has urged officials to take licences off taxi drivers who refuse to transport disabled people. Prof Duncan Cameron, of Sheffield University’s School of Biosciences, said he …

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It is a legal requirement for hackney carriages (normally Black cab taxis) to not refuse to transport a person in a wheelchair and if they do they could be liable to a fine of £1000 under the Equality Act 2010.

However, Local Authorities do have authority to take further actions if they feel the taxi driver is not a ‘fit and proper‘ person. This could mean the losing of their licence.

Local Authorities need to take charge to ensure the Equality Act is abided by and thereby eliminate discrimination.

Source: Taxi Wheelchair Refusals Leave Users Vulnerable | Same Difference

Councils compelled to take asylum-seeking children despite exemption requests – Community Care


The Home Office has told 29 councils that had asked to be exempt from taking unaccompanied asylum-seeking children into their care that they must do so. All 206 local authorities with responsibility for children in care in England, Scotland and Wales, plus all five trusts in Northern Ireland, must now take part in the national […]

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It is a major problem with the World that the numbers of refugees is increasing for many reasons and many are unaccompanied children who are unaccompanied, mainly through no fault of their own.

There is much unrest and conflicts in the World today, many in the so called undeveloped world, but the definition of undeveloped is stated by the so called developed world. Developed in many instances could mean different to many peoples, for how developed does a country have to be developed to be classified as developed. So conflicts, famine and other reasons increase the numbers of unaccompanied children.

But this is not relevant to Local Authorities (LAs) in accepting unaccompanied children, as all LAs need to be open to accepting so there is a spread of allocating throughout the UK.

But, many, if not all LAs are short of funding through no fault of theirs, for this is purely at the door of this Government and others previously. Austerity cuts have a lot to answer for and also the unlistening of governments.

LAs can’t and should not be put in a position of financial unviability and should have a right to be sufficiently funded.

This Government has wasted money in many areas and as yet not been made accountable and much of the wasted fundings as been written off, if this was in the private sector as directors of companies they would have been made ineligible to be directors, so what is different being Ministers.

LAs are on the frontline and are being made to shoulder all the responsibilities when much is down to the Government who appear to shoulder no responsibilities.

Source: Councils compelled to take asylum-seeking children despite exemption requests – Community Care

National Adult Social Care Strategic Partners: our response to the 2021 Queen’s Speech


I agree with all you say and I am supporting the petition, Solve the crisis in Social Care,
https://you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/solve-the-crisis-in-social-care

Please could you support it also, and then share.

More information can been here, https://1drv.ms/w/s!Aq2MsYduiazgoEy6ROxeV0abd2mT?e=PICUib

It is essential that the social care funding is sorted for that is a main area, but also are

Care workers pay and conditions
quality of care
quantity of care
social care not being free at point of delivery, as is health
And others

We are united in our view that the Government’s proposals for the future of social care – promised again in the Queen’s Speech for later this year – must be brought forward urgently along with a clear timeline for action.

As senior members of organisations representing people who draw on, work in, commission, provide and regulate adult social care and support, we are united in our view that the Government’s proposals for the future of social care – promised again in the Queen’s Speech for later this year – must be brought forward urgently along with a clear timeline for action.

This was an important opportunity for the Government to make good on its promise to ‘fix social care’ and move the reform debate further forward, building on the many lessons that have been learned during the course of the pandemic.

One of those lessons is the clear and important…

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Sobbing mother describes ‘barbaric’ treatment of autistic daughter in hospital | Express & Star


Autism is a condition not an illness, so why are the NHS still looking after people with autism as though there is a health cure.

People with autism have difficulty dealing with changes of routine, so taking them from a safe home environment is not a way to deal with anyone showing autistic tendencies. For it is not a health cure that is required, but a change of direction by the health authorities to understand autism more and thereby understand each person with autism. For each person with autism is an individual and needs an individual approach, unfortunately health does not work like that and just uses an approach which is the same for everyone.

Putting persons with autism in these health institutions is nowhere the correct approach, as they need to be within the community, one that is part of them. Autism is not a mental problem, but the way the health authorities and then the general community is. Care in the community should have been the best approach, but true to form community care was never sufficiently funded and is still not along with many other areas including Social Care, which is also seriously underfunded.

The National Health Service and Community Care Act 1990 was supposed to have been the answer, but it would never be without the required sufficient funding.

Care and Treatments reviews were introduced in 2015, to alleviate some of the problems, but really it needs a complete overall and more importantly to be sufficiently funded.

Source: Sobbing mother describes ‘barbaric’ treatment of autistic daughter in hospital | Express & Star

A vision for the future of social care


I so agree, which is why I support the petition, Solve the crisis in Social Care, https://you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/solve-the-crisis-in-social-care

Further information can be found at https://1drv.ms/w/s!Aq2MsYduiazgo1VP3BeD4Qrpt0Xm?e=hHwlFU

This vision has been developed by people that draw on or work in social care and through extensive public audience research. It changes how people think about social care and builds public support for and optimism about investment and reform.

Our social care future

We all want a good life

We all want to live in the place we call home, with the people and things we love, in communities where we look out for one another, doing what matters to us.

Caring about each other

If we or someone we care about has a disability or health condition during our life, we might need some support to do these things. That’s the role of social care.

Drawing on support to live our lives in the way we want to

When organised well, social care helps to weave the web of relationships and support in our local communities that…

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Joint statement on the future funding of adult social care


Yet another saying the Government needs to, urgently, provide the promised review of Social Care including the substantial funding required to ensure Social Care can continue.

I have been saying this for some time and support the Petition, Solve the crisis in Social Care, https://you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/solve-the-crisis-in-social-care

In my promotions of the petition I have been saying the following

‘The issues raised in the petition were mentioned on Boxing Day in a Sky News report, Social Care – The Other Health Crisis., https://news.sky.com/video/social-care-the-other-health-crisis-12172633, regarding an investigation they have done into the crisis in social care.

They highlighted many of these issues and called on the Government to abide by the promise made by Boris Johnson in 2019 in his election winning speech outside 10 Downing Street, one promise that is still outstanding.

Other perspectives were mentioned in the Community Care article, ADASS urges emergency workforce plan as NHS pressures and staff gaps risk ‘overwhelming social care’,

https://www.communitycare.co.uk/2021/01/08/adass-urges-emergency-workforce-plan-nhs-pressures-staff-gaps-risk-overwhelming-social-care/?utm_content=News%20of%20the%20day%20image&utm_campaign=CC%20daily%2011%2F01%2F2021&utm_source=Community%20Care&utm_medium=adestra_email&utm_term=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.communitycare.co.uk%2F2021%2F01%2F08%2Fadass-urges-emergency-workforce-plan-nhs-pressures-staff-gaps-risk-overwhelming-social-care%2F

Please support the petition by signing and sharing and in doing so give your support to Social Care being given the ability to survive.

For without Social Care many in need of care could have serious unmet needs, which could lead to their deaths, perhaps even more than attributed to COVID-19.

Please sign and share the petition to show your support for Social Care

https://you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/solve-the-crisis-in-social-care

#socialcarefuture, a unique movement of people that draw on or work in the field of social care, has today joined forces with organisations representing local councils, charities and professionals to call on Ministersto break their silence on the future funding of social care.

Anna Severwright, convener of #socialcarefuture said “While the government has set out its ‘roadmap to freedom’, many of us who draw on social care to live our lives fear something akin to permanent lockdown unless further resources are committed urgently.”

“People and families in our network that draw on social care are already telling us that they are facing increased costs and reduced services because of this underinvestment in our lives. After the year many of us have had to endure, this just adds insult to injury”

“Today we are joining with others to express our deep disappointment at the invisibility of social care in the Chancellor’s…

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With no certainty over retail’s future, are John Lewis staff now being undersold? | Retail industry | The Guardian


Is this the final ending of the High Street as we have known it.

Store after store with many retailers has been ongoing for many years,  https://www.gov.uk/introduction-to-business-rates but COVID appears to have increased the process.

Many customers, myself included are now only shopping on the internet.

This coupled with the closing of stores is decimating many high street and this is not good, especially those who have no wish to  do not wish to use the internet or have no opportunities to do so.

But it is not just customers who are affected, for Local Authorities, (LAs), rely on businesses for some of their income through Business Rates. This is coupled with the Government Grants, Council Tax, etc. The LAs need income to pay for the various council services we all experience. With less income and this income from Government Grants has been reducing for the past 11 years through the Governments Austerity Cuts. Even though this Government has stated they will not be continuing the austerity cuts, they are not increasing the Grants to offset all the reductions. Then we have the costs related to COVID and Yes, some of this has been reimbursed by the Government. but not all.

Many of the Council services are essential and even though some people think not Social Care is one.

Social Care is a vital service for those who are in need of care and their families, who have and are still going all they can to provide much of the care needed. Currently family carers are providing over £130 billion in Social Care, so without family carers the costs to LAs would be very much more. But family carers are not able to provide more and without Council Social Care input their vulnerable relatives will suffer in many areas of live we all take for granted, the right to live a reasonable life.

The promised White Paper on Social Care, which has been promised for many years, has still not been published, it was urgently required at least 10 years ago, so now the situation in social care is exceedingly worrying. My own worry is, will Social Care be able to last until the Government, not only, publishes the White Paper, but enacts the measures, urgently required.

Without these measures deaths will occur and maybe in excess of those related to COVID-19.

So please support the petition, Solve the crisis in Social Care, https://you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/solve-the-crisis-in-social-care

Source: With no certainty over retail’s future, are John Lewis staff now being undersold? | Retail industry | The Guardian

Fury At ‘Do Not Resuscitate’ Notices Given To Covid Patients With Learning Disabilities


For this practice to have recurred in the second wave of the pandemic when it was highlighted in the first is extremely worrying, for it needs the dreaded phrase ‘lessons will be learnt’ to be utter again. For, lessons, it appears are never learnt, for to be learnt there must be a willingness to learn, from which it is evident that the willingness is not there, and I do doubt will ever be.

For this stems from the practice in health and many other areas for ‘we know best’ and that it is of no concern that patients and their families are not worthy of being considered.

This centres on the belief that the system is sacrosanct, and people affected are of no concern.

Whereas the person should be at the centre, self-centred care, should be central as the system should fit the person and not the person the system. If it is not possible to achieve then the system needs to be altered to ensure it is.

For, far too long health and also Social Care and other areas feel they are too important to change and therefore the person at the centre is virtually ignored.

If it was not for persons, then health and social care and other areas would not be required. Each person is different and therefore it should not be assumed the practice of ‘one fits all’ is how it should be.

All systems must be flexible to change as and when required with ease and quickly be adaptable.

Unfortunately, there is much disregard with people and organisations for the opinions of people who feel they need to be considered. But their opinions are important and should be listened to for they are endeavouring to make things better for everyone.

Same Difference

People with learning disabilities have been given do not resuscitate orders during the second wave of the pandemic, in spite of widespread condemnation of the practice last year and an urgent investigation by the care watchdog.

Mencap said it had received reports in January from people with learning disabilities that they had been told they would not be resuscitated if they were taken ill with Covid-19.

The Care Quality Commission said in December that inappropriate Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (DNACPR) notices had caused potentially avoidable deaths last year.Advertisementhttps://eb3ca1ecd275ae49142ae247f5e428af.safeframe.googlesyndication.com/safeframe/1-0-37/html/container.html

DNACPRs are usually made for people who are too frail to benefit from CPR, but Mencap said some seem to have been issued for people simply because they had a learning disability. The CQC is due to publish a report on the practice within weeks.

The disclosure comes as campaigners put growing pressure on ministers to reconsider a decision not…

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