Health and Social Care Secretary announces half a billion rollout to improve patient care | Care Industry News


In his first major speech since taking post last week, the Health and Social Care Secretary this morning announced a half a billion pound package to rollout innovative tech aimed at improving care for patients and supporting staff.

Matt Hancock, Health and Social Care Secretary, said: “Because we are one NHS, our health system is uniquely placed to become the most advanced health system in the world – one where technology addresses the user need – making care better for patients, but just as importantly making life easier for staff.

“For too long, decisions on health and care have seemed to involve a trade-off – improving patient outcomes at the expense of placing ever more pressure on staff, while reducing the demands on staff has been seen to have an impact on patient care.

“Technology and data innovation offers an opportunity to move past this binary approach.”

As part of the plan the Government will invest £412 million into new technology at hospitals which will improve efficiency, enhance patient safety and help more patients access health services at home.

The Health and Social Care Secretary also set out plans to support the NHS workforce. He said:

“The nation’s health is determined by the health of the health and care workforce.

“So it is heart-breaking to see how undervalued you often feel.

 

Source: Health and Social Care Secretary announces half a billion rollout to improve patient care | Care Industry News

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Renata Jones: Shared space works for no one | Conservative Home


Cllr Renata Jones is a councillor in Charnwood.

The first I ever heard of the shared space concept was seeing one materialise in Leicester city centre. It just sprung up one day, at the newly named Jubilee Square. Formerly known as St Nicholas circle, I still feel the need to smirk a little whenever I hear or feel forced to use what still feels like the new name for this area, although we’re now a few years on.

Having worked near said square when I first heard it was to change, I asked around and read some more. I heard concerns of fellow workers and some business owners in the area. I found info on the council website. I responded to a consultation. Knowing how slippery council can be perceived to be, I demanded in doing so that I get a receipt of my consultation response, and notification of when the meeting to discuss it would be, and copy minutes of any outcome. I got an email receipt acknowledging my consultation related response. I had thought I’d go to the city council and watch the debate, but I was never told when it was debated. Nor was I sent related meeting minutes. Work just began one day to change the square.

Despite voicing concerns at the plans, I never anticipated just how odd it would be when finished. A deliberately undulating lawn created what could perhaps aspirationally be called a ‘design feature’ to an architect or garden designer, or perhaps injury or death trap by a health and safety officer. Parts of the lawn had one meter high cliff edges. High enough to do enough damage if you fell off onto the concrete below, but shallow enough that it’d look flat if you walked along head up instead of down. I tried asking the council if there’d been accidents as a result of this soon after creation, only one report I believe they said at the time. Observers frequenting nearby establishments told me they’d seen three the first day Heras fencing was taken away, two pedestrians and a cyclist. Sounded more painful somehow for the cyclist, given related speed of travel.

 

Source: Renata Jones: Shared space works for no one | Conservative Home

Care needs will continue to increase and deepen the crisis in adult social care | Care Industry News


Responding to a report by Age UK on a rise in unmet care needs and the costs to the NHS of delayed discharges due to a lack of social care, Cllr Izzi Seccombe, Chairman of the Local Government Association’s Community Wellbeing Board, said:

“People’s unmet care needs will continue to increase and deepen the crisis in adult social care unless the sector receives a long-term fundingsettlement, like the NHS, and further funding is made available for council’s public health and prevention services.

“To prevent crises in the NHS, government needs to plug the £3.5 billion funding gap facing adult social care by 2025 and reverse the £600 million in reductions to councils’ public health grants between 2015/16 and 2019/20.

 

Source: Care needs will continue to increase and deepen the crisis in adult social care | Care Industry News

“Essex council has defended plans to charge pensioners £26 to help them to their feet if they’ve had a fall at home.” | Nye Bevan News


“Essex council proposes £25.92 ‘lifting charge’ to help elderly up when they fall
Tendring District Council has proposed the extra charge to its existing care service for staff to visit the homes to help people get back up

A local council has defended plans to charge pensioners £26 to help them to their feet if they’ve had a fall at home.

Tendring District Council, in Clacton-on-Sea in Essex, has come under fire after proposing a £25.92 additional annual charge to around 2,500 Essex residents who use its Careline service.

The “lifting service” will mean Careline staff go to the home of the elderly person with a touch of a special alarm button.

Michael Le Cornu, chairman of the Tendring Pensioners’ Action group told the Mirror it meant people would in effect be “penalised for falling”.

“PENSIONERS HAD PAID TAX FOR HEALTH SERVICES ALL THEIR LIVES – AND WERE IN EFFECT BEING ASKED TO PAY AGAIN.”

 

Source: “Essex council has defended plans to charge pensioners £26 to help them to their feet if they’ve had a fall at home.” | Nye Bevan News

Ten years after the financial crisis


Why is it that when there are crises of any nature as the Banking crisis, the various local authorities with Children’s services and a multitude of other and there is the quote, ‘lessons will be learnt’ why is it these lessons are never learnt.

Is it because additional finance may be required, local authorities and Bankers lie, there is no willingness to learn or many other reasons?

What ever is the reason or reasons there should be some system to ensure the lessons have been learnt and if not people should be made accountable.

If there was accountability and this was upheld in Law, then, I believe there will be change for the better, so why is there no effort to bring in such a law. Is it because those that are responsible to create laws are more than likely the people most guilty of not addressing accountability, Yes, the Government, Ministers and MPs.

Phil Ebersole's Blog

Canary Wharf financial district in London. Source: Quartz.

Ten years after the financial crisis of 2008, the U.S. government has failed to do anything necessary to avoid a new crisis.   I just read an article in the London Review of Books that says that the U.K. government’s policies are just as bad.

Like the U.S.-based banks, the British banks engaged in financial engineering that was supposed to create high profit on completely safe investments—which, as experience proved, couldn’t be done.

The British government had to bail out the banking system in order to save the economy.  There probably was no alternative to that.  But it then proceeded to put things back just the way they were before.

John Lancaster, the LRB writer, said there was no attempt at “ring fencing”—what we Americans call firewalls—to split up investment banks, which speculated on the financial markets, and retail banks, which granted…

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What does the NHS need to survive for another 70 years? | Richard Horton, Clare Gerada, and others | Opinion | The Guardian


As the health service marks its 70th anniversary, experts offer their prescriptions for keeping it going

 

Source: What does the NHS need to survive for another 70 years? | Richard Horton, Clare Gerada, and others | Opinion | The Guardian

Council cuts are putting the vulnerable at risk


So the ‘LGA is calling for councils’ funding problems to be addressed through a government spending review expected in spring 2019, which is likely to set out public services funding plans over the four years to 2023.’. However, by then will there be any councils left, especially for social care.

Will the funding commence in 2019 or much later, when it should have commenced from 2017 or much earlier.

Again, those who can least afford it are being left to suffer, where is the quality of life.

Govt Newspeak

Council cuts are putting the vulnerable at risk, Tory peer says
LGA chief says austerity could damage local authorities ‘beyond recognition’

There is speculation that more local authorities could follow Northamptonshire county council into bankruptcy.

Local authorities have reached the point where relentless financial cutbacks are putting the wellbeing of vulnerable adults and children at risk, the Conservative leader of the Local Government Association (LGA) has warned.

The Tory peer Lord Porter said that after eight years of austerity during which £16bn has been stripped from municipal budgets in England, councils risked being “damaged beyond recognition” and communities depleted of vital services.

An £8bn black hole in council budgets would open up by 2023 unless ministers stepped in to close the gap between spiralling demand for adult and children’s social care services and shrinking town hall incomes, he said.

“We’ve reached a point where councils will no longer be able to support our residents as they expect, including our most vulnerable,” Porter added.

As…

View original post 491 more words

Sheffield City Council – Carers Improvement Forum


Carers Service Improvement Forum

Hi, I am Chris Sterry and I am a Carer representative on the Carers Service Improvement Forum (Carers SIF) and our next meeting should be on Wednesday 25 July 2018 at the Town Hall, Committee Room 2 from 10.30am to 12.30pm and thereafter at 2 monthly intervals, some previous minutes can be found here

I say ‘should’ as Sheffield City Council wish to cancel this meeting and any further meetings due to the lack of Carers attending.

By attending these meetings, you will have an opportunity to speak and see some Council Officials relating to Social Care within the City of Sheffield, the Director of Adult Social Care, Phil Holmes attends regular.  You will also have opportunities to discuss forthcoming changes within Sheffield City Council around areas relating to caring in Sheffield.

We have already lost one Service Improvement Forum, that being for Learning Disabilities which was done by subterfuge, do we really wish to lose the Carers SIF also.

I implore you to attend on Wednesday 25 July 2018 and show your appreciation for the Voice of Carers in Sheffield.

You may not classify yourself as a carer or may not like the term ‘carer’ but if you care for anyone, on an unpaid basis, within Sheffield you are entitled to attend any of the Carer SIF meetings. If you can’t attend these meetings, do not let your voice go unheard for you can contact myself on carervoice@gmail.com. I do have other email addresses, namely ldcarersbuttygroup@gmail.com, which I created for the Learning Disability Carers group I facilitate.

Even if you do not wish to do any of the above, please use your voice and either contact your Local Councillor or your MP.

I feel it is important to have a voice and unfortunately, currently, the facilities to have one are minimal, if the Carers SIF goes then that minimal will be further reduced.

Another voice for Carers in Sheffield is the Sheffield Carers Centre which is located on

Ground Floor East

Concept House

5 Young Street

Sheffield

S1 4UP

0114 2788942

Looking forward to seeing you on Wednesday 25 July 2018 from 10.30am to 12.30pm in the Town Hall Committee Room 2.

Thank you

Chris Sterry

Ground-breaking co-production report ‘creates blueprint for national change’ | DisabledGo News and Blog


A “ground-breaking” report on co-production has created a blueprint for disabled people’s organisations (DPOs) across the country to push for change from their own local authorities.

Disabled campaigners yesterday called for the report of the Hammersmith and Fulham Disabled People’s Commission to be shared with other local authorities and DPOs.

Speaking at its launch in west London, they said other councils should follow the example of Labour-run Hammersmith and Fulham council, which commissioned the report.

Nothing About Disabled People Without Disabled People focuses on how to remove the barriers disabled people face in the London borough by embedding a culture of genuine co-production within the council.

Among the barriers that disabled residents told the commission about were disability hate crime; inaccessible shops and public transport; social isolation; a shortage of accessible housing; a lack of support for inclusive education; benefits cuts and poverty; and cuts to social care and support.

All the commission’s 10 members were disabled people, and their eight recommendations have each been accepted in full by the council.

The commission spent more than a year examining research, running surveys for residents, council staff and councillors, and holding meetings and public events.

Among their recommendations, they call for the council to work in genuine co-production with disabled residents; to introduce an accessible communication strategy to promote co-production across the borough; to produce a new co-production budget; and to develop a long-term strategy for funding DPOs in the borough.

Tracey Lazard, chief executive of Inclusion London, a user-led organisation which supports DPOs across the capital, said that none of the “same old consultations and listening exercises” carried out by other councils even came close to what was happening in Hammersmith and Fulham.

 

Source: Ground-breaking co-production report ‘creates blueprint for national change’ | DisabledGo News and Blog

Sheffield launches Action Plan for Adult Carers | Sheffield News Room


The newly launched Sheffield’s Adult Carers action plan will make sure that people in a caring role continue to get the support they need so that they can care for others.

The action plan was conceptualised by carers themselves at an event they held and will support their 60,000 unpaid adult peers across Sheffield.

Sheffield City Council works not only with the individual themselves but also a range of related organisations including Sheffield Carers Centre, Sheffield Young Carers, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals, Health and Social Care Trust and Sheffield Clinical Commissioning Group to coordinate the help and support given to the city’s carers.

Chris, who cares for his adult daughter who has autism and cerebral palsy explained that it was essential that the process was a genuine collaboration between services and individual carers and that the plan needed to be “open, honest and transparent to make lasting change.”

 

Source: Sheffield launches Action Plan for Adult Carers | Sheffield News Room