If Germany atoned for the Holocaust, the US can pay reparations for slavery


The idea of paying reparations for slavery is gaining momentum in the United States, despite being long derided as an unrealistic plan, to compensate for state violence committed by and against people long dead.

The topic saw substantive debate in the July 30 Democratic primary debate, with candidate Marianne Williamson calling slavery “a debt that is owed.” Some Democratic congressional representatives are also pushing for financial recompense for the descendants of enslaved people.

Calls for reparations in the U.S. are generally met with skepticism: What would reparations achieve? Who should receive them, and under what conditions?

Other countries have tackled these questions. In 1995, South Africa established its Truth and Reconciliation Commission and paid reparations to the victims of apartheid. Eight years before, the United States apologized to 82,000 Japanese Americans unduly imprisoned during World War II and paid them US$20,000 each to compensate for their suffering.

Even Germany, birthplace of the worst racism ever institutionalized and elevated to official policy, has some lessons for the United States as it considers reparations.

Compensating victims of Nazi enslavement

I am a professor of political science who studies the relationship between democracy, citizenship and justice. My recent work on Germany examines how the country dealt with the horrors of the Holocaust.

Nazi Germany not only killed millions of Jews between 1933 and 1945. It also forced over 20 million people into slave labor, working them to their death in German industries. By 1944, a quarter of the German workforce was enslaved laborers.

 

Source: If Germany atoned for the Holocaust, the US can pay reparations for slavery

Donald Trump’s War On LGBTQ Americans Is Ramping Up | HuffPost UK


Less than two weeks after he was inaugurated, Donald Trump did something that, at the time, seemed decent: On Jan. 31, 2017, the White House put out a press release promising to safeguard LGBTQ rights. Specifically, the memo claimed the new president would not overturn a 2014 Obama administration executive order protecting LGBTQ employees of federal contractors from workplace discrimination.

“President Donald J. Trump is determined to protect the rights of all Americans, including the LGBTQ community,” the memo stated.

Trump’s been gaslighting America on the subject of LGBTQ rights ever since. Through executive orders, agency rule-making and tweets, the Trump administration has been blasting away at the LGBTQ community from the start.

Now, the administration is ratcheting up the stakes, filing a series of briefs ― one late last week and one expected this Friday ― in a critical LGBTQ rights case scheduled to come before the Supreme Court this fall.

On Oct. 4, the court will hear oral arguments in a trio of cases considering whether the protections of Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, religion and sex, extends to sexual orientation and gender identity.

To put it simply, the question before the court is: Can you be fired for being gay or lesbian or bisexual or transgender?

 

Source: Donald Trump’s War On LGBTQ Americans Is Ramping Up | HuffPost UK

Trump: Jews who vote Democrat show ‘lack of knowledge or great disloyalty’ | TheHill


President Trump said Tuesday that Jewish people who vote for Democrats are either ignorant or disloyal as he railed against two congresswomen who have been critical of the U.S.-Israel alliance.

“I think Jewish people that vote for a Democrat — I think it shows either a total lack of knowledge or great disloyalty,” Trump told reporters during an Oval Office meeting with the president of Romania.

Trump and the GOP have sought to win over Jewish voters from the Democratic Party by criticizing statements by Reps. Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich.) and Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.), the first two Muslim women elected to Congress. Both have criticized Israel’s government.

Trump last week urged Israel to block Tlaib and Omar from visiting the country, saying in a tweet that allowing the visit would show “great weakness.” An hour after Trump’s tweet, Israel denied the congresswomen entry.

But in stating that Jewish people who voted for Democrats were disloyal, Trump appeared to step into the same verbal quagmire about Jewish loyalty to the Israeli state that had drawn criticism to Omar earlier this year.

Omar took heat for remarks that suggested to some that Jewish Americans were more loyal to Israel than the United States.

Trump’s comments came as he accused Tlaib and Omar of hating Israel and the Jewish people, and he complained that Democrats should also be criticizing them.

“The concept of even talking about this … of cutting off aid to Israel because of two people that hate Israel and hate Jewish people, I can’t believe we’re even having this conversation,” Trump said in the Oval Office.

“Where has the Democratic Party gone?” he continued. “Where have they gone … where they’re defending these two people over the state of Israel?”

Jewish groups and Democratic lawmakers swiftly condemned the president’s Tuesday remarks.

“At a time when anti-Semitic incidents have increased — due to the president’s emboldening of white nationalism — Trump is repeating an anti-Semitic trope. If this is about Israel, then Trump is repeating a dual loyalty claim, which is a form of anti-Semitism. If this is about Jews being ‘loyal’ to him, then Trump needs a reality check,” said Halie Soifer, executive director of the Jewish Democratic Council of America.

 

Source: Trump: Jews who vote Democrat show ‘lack of knowledge or great disloyalty’ | TheHill

If Germany atoned for the Holocaust, the US can pay reparations for slavery : The Conversation


The idea of paying reparations for slavery is gaining momentum in the United States, despite being long derided as an unrealistic plan, to compensate for state violence committed by and against people long dead.

The topic saw substantive debate in the July 30 Democratic primary debate, with candidate Marianne Williamson calling slavery “a debt that is owed.” Some Democratic congressional representatives are also pushing for financial recompense for the descendants of enslaved people.

Calls for reparations in the U.S. are generally met with skepticism: What would reparations achieve? Who should receive them, and under what conditions?

Other countries have tackled these questions. In 1995, South Africa established its Truth and Reconciliation Commission and paid reparations to the victims of apartheid. Eight years before, the United States apologized to 82,000 Japanese Americans unduly imprisoned during World War II and paid them US$20,000 each to compensate for their suffering.

Even Germany, birthplace of the worst racism ever institutionalized and elevated to official policy, has some lessons for the United States as it considers reparations.

Compensating victims of Nazi enslavement

I am a professor of political science who studies the relationship between democracy, citizenship and justice. My recent work on Germany examines how the country dealt with the horrors of the Holocaust.

Nazi Germany not only killed millions of Jews between 1933 and 1945. It also forced over 20 million people into slave labor, working them to their death in German industries. By 1944, a quarter of the German workforce was enslaved laborers.

 

Source: If Germany atoned for the Holocaust, the US can pay reparations for slavery : The Conversation

Rasmus Paludan: Meet the far-right leader who wants to deport all Muslims from Denmark | Euronews


Convicted of racism, accused of Nazi ties, known for burnings of the Quran… and about to become a Danish MP?

Danish lawyer Rasmus Paludan was little known a few months ago but his far-right party has gained traction ahead of a general election on June 5.

His political movement — Stram Kurs (Hard Line) — calls itself the party for “ethnic Danes”, wants to ban Islam and deport all Muslims from Denmark.

His party is forecast to win 2.3%, according to a recent poll published by Voxmeter, which would be enough to enter parliament.

Hard Line’s rise comes as support for the country’s biggest nationalist movement, Danish People’s Party, has fallen.

“Hard Line’s only agenda is to be extremely tough on refugees, immigrants and Muslims in particular, and that attracts a small group of voters who think anti-immigration policies can always get harder and more radical,” said elections specialist and professor of political science at Copenhagen University, Kasper Møller Hansen.

Since founding his party in July 2017, Paludan has earned a following on YouTube and Snapchat but in recent months he emerged from virtual stardom among teenagers to securing election candidacy by gathering the required 20,000 digital signatures of endorsement from voters.

In April, a Danish court found Paludan guilty of racism after he argued that people from Africa are less intelligent.

Paludan said in a December 2018 video: “The enemy is Islam and Muslims. The best thing would be if there were not a single Muslim left on this earth. Then we would have reached our final goal.”

The foundation of Hard Line is “ethnonationalism” and Paludan says you need at least two grandparents of Danish origins to prove you are Danish.

Martin Krasnik, editor-in-chief of the Danish newspaper “Weekendavisen”, called Paludan a Nazi in a recent editorial. He said that Paludan is “clearly familiar with the Nuremberg laws” from Nazi-era Germany.

Paludan denies having any associations with Nazism.

 

Source: Rasmus Paludan: Meet the far-right leader who wants to deport all Muslims from Denmark | Euronews

Sri Lanka imposes emergency, says international network involved in attacks – Reuters


The emergency law, which gives police and the military extensive powers to detain and interrogate suspects without court orders, will go into effect at midnight on Monday, the president’s office said.

Colombo, the seaside capital of the Indian Ocean island, was jittery on Monday. Police said 87 bomb detonators were found at the city’s main bus station, while an explosive went off near a church where scores were killed on Sunday when bomb squad officials were trying to defuse it.

A night curfew will go into effect at 8 p.m., the government announced.

There was no claim of responsibility for the attack but suspicion was focusing on Islamist militants in the Buddhist-majority country.

 

Source: Sri Lanka imposes emergency, says international network involved in attacks – Reuters

Jewish Labour Movement passes motion of no confidence in Corbyn – Reuters


LONDON (Reuters) – The Jewish Labour Movement, which is affiliated to Britain’s main opposition Labour Party, passed a motion of no confidence in party leader Jeremy Corbyn on Sunday over his handling of anti-Semitism complaints, Sky News reported.

Corbyn, a veteran campaigner for Palestinian rights and a critic of the Israeli government, has long been accused of failing to tackle anti-semitism in the Labour Party.
Several lawmakers quit the party this year in protest against what they said was rising anti-Semitism within it and because they oppose Labour’s position on Brexit.

Corbyn has promised to drive anti-Semitism out of Labour, and earlier on Sunday, Shami Chakrabarti, the party’s legal policy chief, urged the Jewish Labour Movement to “stay in Labour and to tackle racism together”.

“My plea to the Jewish Labour Movement is … not to personalise it and make it about Jeremy Corbyn because he is one person and he won’t be leader forever,” she told Sky.

 

Source: Jewish Labour Movement passes motion of no confidence in Corbyn – Reuters

Commonwealth Secretary-General calls for Brunei to revoke death by stoning for gay sex and adultery : inews


  • Baroness Patricia Scotland called on Brunei to ‘reconsider’ ruling
  • The law is part of the country’s ‘third phase’ of introducing Sharia Law

The Secretary-General of the Commonwealth has urged Brunei to revoke the death penalty for gay sex and adultery that came into force on Wednesday.

Baroness Patricia Scotland told i the new laws “will potentially bring into effect cruel and inhuman punishments which contravene international human rights law and standards”.

She has called on the South Asian island, which has been a member of the Commonwealth since 1984, to “reconsider” the ruling.

The move has been condemned by the United Nations and called “inhumane” by Amnesty International.

Commonwealth charter

The sultanate in Asia – on Borneo island with Indonesia and Malaysia as its neighbours – is adding same-sex, adultery and a number of other sex acts to its capital punishment.

In a statement to i, Baroness Scotland said that since 1984 the nation had “committed itself to upholding the values and principles of the Commonwealth Charter which underscores a commitment to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other relevant human rights covenants and international instruments.”

Source: Commonwealth Secretary-General calls for Brunei to revoke death by stoning for gay sex and adultery : inews

Broken Faith: Inside the Catholic Church’s plan to quietly pay survivors of sexual abuse – VICE News


When Paul Barr was 16 years old, a priest asked him to the rectory of the Sacred Heart church in Niagara Falls, New York. Barr remembers that the priest handed him a beer, suggested that he lie down, and then touched his groin.

Four decades later, Barr learned that his story was worth $45,000.

In January, Barr got the offer from the Catholic Diocese of Buffalo, as he sat at his desk at his law firm a few blocks from the Canadian border. Barr was prepared for disappointment; he was accustomed to the Catholic Church letting him down. But he still felt betrayed by the offer.

“I was just full of resentment. But I don’t want to let that resentment eat me alive,” the 54-year-old personal injury attorney said. So, after the call, he got back to work.

Barr said he didn’t really care about being compensated for the alleged abuse. Instead, he wanted answers, accountability, maybe an apology. The alleged assault had followed him throughout his life. In high school, Barr got into trouble and struggled to graduate. Later, while working as a firefighter, he worried that the others would leave him behind in a burning building.

 

Source: Broken Faith: Inside the Catholic Church’s plan to quietly pay survivors of sexual abuse – VICE News