Archives for category: Rights

The equality watchdog has asked the government for significant new powers, including the ability to inspect buildings that are flouting access laws. The Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) said it needed stronger powers to hold “powerful and well-resourced” governments and large organisations to account. But it also said that it should be made independent of government, and accountable instead to parliament. The calls came in a blog by the commission’s chair, David Isaac, which was written to mark 10 years since the watchdog was founded. Following his comments, the government told Disability News Service that it had already begun working with EHRC to plan a “tailored review” of the commission, which will look at whether its powers “remain appropriate” and will also consider the issue of its independence. The review is expected to begin in April next year and finish the following month, although it might not be published until 2019. Isaac said in his blog that the commission had

Source: EHRC celebrates 10th birthday with call for new powers | DisabledGo News and Blog

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Health and high quality care for all, now and for future generations

Source: NHS England » NHS leaders unveil action to boost flu vaccination and manage winter pressures


Whistleblowing refers to the disclosure by an employee in a government or public workplace of the wrong doings that they may have observed, witnessed or heard about, how previous violations and practices have shaped current legal and business ethics policies and procedures (Johnson, 2003). What are the acts that can be reported by a whistle blower about a company? What is the right procedure in whistle blowing? How does whistle blowing affect an employee at the work place? Is it possible to conclude on the whistleblowing by focusing on the intent of the whistle blower? What aspects are related to retaliation against whistle blowing? These are some of the questions that when answered might help in understand the law, policies, procedures and effect of whistle blowing in business.

Barbra Dozier's Blog

Whistleblowing refers to the disclosure by an employee in a government or public workplace of the wrong doings that they may have observed, witnessed or heard about, how previous violations and practices have shaped current legal and business ethics policies and procedures (Johnson, 2003). What are the acts that can be reported by a whistle blower about a company? What is the right procedure in whistle blowing? How does whistle blowing affect an employee at the work place? Is it possible to conclude on the whistleblowing by focusing on the intent of the whistle blower? What aspects are related to retaliation against whistle blowing? These are some of the questions that when answered might help in understand the law, policies, procedures and effect of whistle blowing in business.

Usually the issue of whistle blowing involves the protection of the public interest and safety and cases that are reported do not…

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More than half of councils expect to overspend their adult social care budgets this year by up to nearly £21 million each, while all local authorities face having to help pay a potential adult social care bill of nearly £270 million to fund six years of back-pay for sleep-in shifts, according to a new survey published today by the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services (ADASS).

 

The poll shows that sleep-in pay costs are the second biggest concern – after ring-fenced investment money – for directors of adult social services directors in England as they approach winter pressures facing the sector.

 

The survey found that the average cost – for councils, providers and self-funders, per council area – to pay for six years of backpay for sleep-in shifts is £1.78 million. If this figure was applied to the 151 councils in England providing adult social care the total would amount to £269 million.

 

The potential bill comes as more than half (53%) of Directors forecast an overspend on adult social care budgets this financial year. The average estimated overspend is £2 million, with the highest at £20.8 million.

Source: Social care and local authorities face a ‘perfect storm’ in funding | Care Industry News


“Conference, delegates, friends. I know I speak for the whole Disabled Members Group, and for disabled people up and down the country, when I say we are deeply grateful for the overwhelming support shown by so many branches, members and elected representatives for this resolution.

When the UK signed up to the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons With Disabilities in 2009, Labour were in government, and although disabled people were already dying from Blair’s reforms, the full weight of these seemingly disparate deaths wasn’t yet understood.

A year later, when the Coalition took office, we know that they had already received a Coroner’s Report on the Prevention of Future Deaths, which would save lives if implemented. Iain Duncan Smith and Chris Grayling decided to ignore it, and the Tory/LibDem Coalition dedicated their time in government to implementing sweeping, devastating cuts to social security, health and social care – a programme which continues to cut further and deeper with every passing year.

In 2012, Disabled People Against Cuts began the formal process of triggering a UN investigation into violations of the CRPD. This was based not just on the lives lost, but on the multitude of ways the Austerity cuts have made life harder for disabled people. We have been pushing for a cumulative impact study for years, because disabled people are rarely affected by just one cut.

It takes a long time to initiate an investigation, as multiple sources of evidence have to be submitted, verified and researched. In 2014, the UK became the first government to ever be investigated by the CRPD, a shameful mark on our history. No UN investigation is undertaken frivolously – t

 

Source: My Speech on the UNCRPD Judgement at the SNP Conference-Fiona Robertson – Black Triangle Campaign


If the vice president understood his own personal statement, he would have stayed at Sunday’s game

Source: Why Mike Pence should take a knee, not walk out – Salon.com


When Lauren Pitt graduated with a 2:1 degree in Theology and built up an extensive list of volunteering experience, she didn’t imagine she would have too many

Source: “I’ve got a good degree and great CV but I’ve been turned down for 250 jobs because I’m blind” | DisabledGo News and Blog


The Conservative minister for care services turned down at least four invitations to speak about adult social care at her party’s annual conference, while disabled people and other experts warned those meetings about the funding crisis facing the system. Jackie Doyle-Price refused to attend at least four social care fringe meetings at the conference in Manchester, Disability News Service has established. Health secretary Jeremy Hunt also ignored the issue of social care in his conference speech. Those who spoke at the fringe meetings Doyle-Price snubbed lined up to warn of the crisis facing the social care system, with one Tory MP warning that it “simply isn’t good enough” and that many people were “not getting the care they need”. In August, the UK government was told it was “going backwards” on independent living by the UN committee on the rights of persons with disabilities. Last week, Barbara Keeley, shadow minister for social care and mental health, told Labour’s annual conference

Source: Tory conference: Care minister hides from fringe as funding crisis deepens | DisabledGo News and Blog


Pro-gun advocates are using the ambiguous language of the Constitution to mask a right-wing agenda

Source: Gun control and history: It’s never been about the Second Amendment – Salon.com


David Gauke the latest in a long line of ministers of state for DWP this week refused to halt the roll out of Universal Credit despite warnings from many credible sources including his own backbenchers that it was a disaster in waiting.

As the roll out of Universal Credit proceeds more and more disabled people are likely to find that they miss out on any transitional protections and in the worst case scenario that their claim is treated as a new one they face the loss of £78.35 a week from their social security payments.

This is because in Universal credit there are no Severe Disability Premiums or Enhanced Disability Premium paid. They simply vanish into thin air.

Research has shown that the additional cost of being disabled is £500 per month extra but the nasty party are stripping claimants of most of the money they need to meet those additional costs.

We’re planning something for International Day of Disabled People with more details about this to follow but in the meantime we’re asking people to contact their MPs and ask them to justify taking £73.35 pw away from those who have the highest support needs/ are most severely disabled.

Maybe they’ll say how they manage to sleep at nights.

 

Source: Daylight Robbery – Most severely disabled people will lose £78.35 pw from Universal Credit – DPAC

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