The DWP just caved in yet again over disabled people’s benefits


Whenever chahges are made it is down to saving money hence PIP and ESA were brought in and the idea was to remove people from the benefits system byany means.

However, there had to be rules and regulations. Not only should these rules and regulations be correctly administered they need to be lawful and equitable.

But in all of the above the new benefits systems did not comply, the rules and regualations were not correctly administered on every occasion, if ever. With the court cases coming forth it would also appear that the system was not always lawfull and equitable.

As every appeal and certainly court cases cost would it not have been reasonable for the system to have lawful and equitable rules and regulations which were abided by in every occasion, so then and only then money may have been saved.

But by ignorance or design the implementation of PIP and ESA have been set up to fail and cost more than they should, while showing disrespect and lack of dignity to the respective claimants.

Govt Newspeak

BLACK TRIANGLE

The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) has once again had to change its policy surrounding disabled people’s benefits. This time, it involves the assessments carried out for people living with severe conditions or impairments.

The DWP: caving in?

On Monday 18 June, Sarah Newton – the minister for disabled people, health and work – said the government was changing the way people living with “severe or progressive conditions” got their Personal Independence Payment (PIP). Specifically, the DWP said that people with the “highest level” of PIP support:

and where their needs are expected to stay the same or increase – will receive an ongoing award of PIP with a light touch review every 10 years.

According to the website Benefits and Work, there are currently no set times when the DWP reviews people’s PIP. Claims last for fixed periods, and the department can review them at any time…

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A ‘senseless and unfounded’ DWP policy is causing harm to claimants and costing the NHS millions, says a charity | The Canary


A new campaign by the charity MS Society is calling on the DWP to scrap a “senseless and unfounded” policy that’s harming claimants and costing the NHS millions.

The 20 metre rule

MS Society represents people who suffer from Multiple Sclerosis (MS). MS is a “condition which can affect the brain and/or spinal cord”. It causes a wide range of symptoms, including fatigue, trouble walking, numbness, muscle stiffness / spasms, and problems with balance.

The charity’s campaign is focused on scrapping the ’20 metre rule’ which governs access to the mobility component of the PIP disability benefit. A press release for the campaign seen by The Canary states:

People with MS have been increasingly losing vital support since Personal Independence Payment (PIP) began in 2013. The biggest change has been the introduction of the 20 metre rule, used in PIP assessments to determine eligibility for the higher rate of mobility support. Under the previous benefit – Disability Living Allowance (DLA) – the measure was 50 metres. Now, if you can walk just one step over 20 metres, roughly the length of two double-decker buses, you won’t qualify for higher level of mobility support. Under DLA 94% of people with MS were receiving this higher rate but this has fallen to just 66% under PIP.

The charity has also released a campaign video highlighting the callousness of the 20 metre policy:

 

Source: A ‘senseless and unfounded’ DWP policy is causing harm to claimants and costing the NHS millions, says a charity | The Canary

PIP: Politicians unite to demand dignity for terminally ill


As though a person, with a terminal condition, attempting to claim PIP and their family have not enough to contend with the Department for Communities are adding to this with their insistence that these claimants are subjected to the full rigours of the PIP system.

The Department for Communities needs to listen to these 6 political parties and the respective families and show dignity for once to the terminally ill.

Govt Newspeak

Woman in hospital bed
 Six political parties have signed a letter calling for a fairer definition of terminal illness to be applied in the Personal Independence Payment (PIP) process.

The system requires people with a life expectancy of longer than six months to undertake a face-to-face assessment to prove they are terminally ill.

They can then face a wait of up to three months for payment.

The DUP, Sinn Féin, SDLP, UUP, Alliance and Green Party have signed the letter.

Politicians described the current system as “cruel, traumatic and lacking in dignity and compassion”.

Charities and clinicians say the six-month definition most severely affects patients suffering from non-cancer terminal conditions, such as dementia, for which it can be difficult to predict an accurate life-expectancy.

In April, the Scottish government announced there would be no limit set on how long…

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Esther McVey just dropped a DWP bomb on parliament then ran off for the weekend


Full answers need to be given and appropriate action taken to ensure all are given PIP who qualify.

If McVey and the DWP can not do this then find who can.

People and Departments have to be made accountable.

Govt Newspeak

Esther McVey just dropped a DWP bomb on parliament then ran off for the weekend

The Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) has had quite a week, lurching from one crisis to the next. And on Friday 15 June, the secretary of state for work and pensions, Esther McVey, topped it all off by dropping a crucial written statement on parliament. She then effectively ran off for the weekend.

Another day, another DWP scandal

As The Canary previously reported, judges forced the DWP to admit it had been incorrectly interpreting its own guidelines for Personal Independence Payment (PIP). The department’s climb-down was in relation to two court cases where it had previously denied two disabled people PIP. This was on the basis they did not meet some of its criteria for the “daily living” component of the benefit.

After tribunals disagreed and told the DWP it must give the two claimants PIP, the department was going to appeal. But on 30…

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No surprise that the only MP to object to making upskirting a crime is a Tory


This MP is a blight on the human race, the people of Christchurch should remember his action as a action to degrade any females within their families. He should forfeit the opportunity to stand at the next election as anyone who votes for him will show they have no respect for any female.

Stop UK lies & corruption

A bill to make upskirting a specific criminal offence punishable by up to two years in prison has been blocked in the House of Commons after a single MP, Sir Christopher Chope, objected to it.

Echoes of ‘shame’ could be heard around parliament in reaction to his objection.

The same Tory MP objected to making it a criminal offence to attack police dogs, horses, and prison officer dogs.

Chope is no stranger to controversy.  In 2009 he was exposed in the expenses scandal for claiming £136,992 including £881 to repair a sofa.  The same year, he called for the minimum wage to be abolished.

He came under fire again in 2013 for referring to some of the staff in the House of Commons as “servants”.  Later that year he voted against the legislation for same-sex marriage.

He is known for blocking and filibustering of bills including raising an eleventh-hour objection to the Hillsborough debate…

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Atos assessor told gay man he was ‘defective’ and needed to be cured by God


One more mark against ATOS and their assessors, how many more will it take for the DWP to admit the assessments and assessors are ‘not fit for purpose’.

Govt Newspeak

Keith Morgan head and shouldersA doctor working for the government contractor Atos told a gay disabled man she was assessing for his entitlement to disability benefits that his sexuality meant he was “defective” and that God needed to fix him like a “broken” car.

Atos was forced to pay Keith Morgan compensation after he was subjected to an experience at the end of his work capability assessment (WCA) that the company later admitted was “wholly inappropriate”.

The GP told him that when a car had a problem it had to be returned to the dealer to be repaired, just as he needed to be returned to God to be cured of his homosexuality. She then told him of a television programme that featured a gay man who had been “cured” in this way and now had nine children, and she gave him the man’s name and handed him the address of a Christian website that…

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Universal Credit ‘discriminates’ against disabled people, High Court rules : Welfare Weekly


Universal Credit rules which saw two severely disabled men miss out on £178 a month in vital benefits are unlawful and “discriminatory”, the High Court in London has ruled in a landmark legal case.

The two claimants, known only as TP and AR, were in receipt of the Severe Disability Premium (SDP) and Enhanced Disability Premium (EDP), which are designed to meet care costs for those without a carer, before they were required to claim Universal Credit after moving to a new area.

However, both the SDP and EDP have been scrapped under Universal Credit, despite reasurances from Work and Pensions Secretary Esther McVey that “no one will experience a reduction in the benefit they are receiving at the point of migration to Universal Credit where circumstances remain the same”.

TP is a former Cambridge graduate and worked in the finance sector, before being diagnosed with terminal illness – Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma and Castleman’s disease in 2016.

AR is 35 and suffers from severe mental health issues. He moved from Middlesbrough to Hartlepool in 2017 to escape the hated Bedroom Tax, but soon found himself facing the much criticised Universal Credit system and a serious drop in income.

 

Source: Universal Credit ‘discriminates’ against disabled people, High Court rules  : Welfare Weekly

UK to relax immigration rules for non-EU doctors and nurses – BBC says | Reuters


NHS managers have been complaining for a long time that an annual cap on the number of non-EU skilled workers who can immigrate to Britain was making it hard for them to fill positions.

The cap, introduced by Prime Minister Theresa May when she was interior minister, is currently set at 20,700 non-EU skilled workers per year. It was part of a broader effort by May to reduce immigration, in line with promises made to voters by the ruling Conservative Party.

Britain’s planned exit from the European Union is expected to result in restrictions on EU workers coming to the country, which could create further recruitment difficulties for the NHS.

The health service, which has relied on being able to recruit professionals from overseas for decades, currently has tens of thousands of vacancies.

 

Source: UK to relax immigration rules for non-EU doctors and nurses – BBC says | Reuters

‘Wage growth stuck in the slow lane’ despite high employment : Welfare Weekly


UK workers are continuing to experience near stagnant wage rises, despite record numbers of people in work and low unemployment levels, the latest labour market survey from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) reveals.

ONS data published this week shows there were 32.39 million people in work between November 2017 to January 2018 and February to April 2018, 146,000 more than for November 2017 to January 2018 and 440,000 more than for a year earlier, with an overall employment rate of 75.6%.

According to the survey results, there were 1.42 million unemployed people in the last quarter, 38,000 fewer than for November 2017 to January 2018 and 115,000 fewer than for a year earlier. The official unemployment rate fell from 4.6% to 4.2%, in spite of concerns over Brexit and a struggling highstreet.

The number of people regarded as “economically inactive” ( those not working and not seeking or available to work) fell by 72,000, or 21.0% – the lowest since records began in 1971.

However, real-terms wages increased by just 0.4% excluding bonuses,and continue to lag behind inflation, which currently stands at around 2.4%.

 

Source: ‘Wage growth stuck in the slow lane’ despite high employment : Welfare Weekly