‘Multi-millionaire footballer’ calls woman a ‘black slave’ then brags to police: ‘I’m not some civilian’ – Mirror Online


This is the shocking moment a train passenger called a woman a “black slave” before bragging to police “I’m a multi-millionaire footballer”.

Union official Jenna Davis recorded the abuse she received on her phone.

The incident took place on a Virgin train to Birmingham and began when the man was accused of throwing chips at Jenna, who then confronted him, Birmingham Mail reports.

The footage shows the man verbally abusing Jenna, a workplace organiser for GMB Union.

As well as calling her a black slave, he is also alleged to have called her a “black wolf”.

 

Source: ‘Multi-millionaire footballer’ calls woman a ‘black slave’ then brags to police: ‘I’m not some civilian’ – Mirror Online

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Sport England fund increase in sporting opportunities for people with complex disabilities | DisabledGo News and Blog


Sense, the national disability charity, have received a grant of £212,431, from Sport England, who have extended funding to May 2019, for its ‘Sporting Sense’ project, to increase opportunities for people with complex disabilities, to take part in sport and physical activity.

Since the project was launched in June 2016, it has successfully helped over a thousand people to be actively involved in sports, and trained care workers, sport providers, carers and families, to support participation in activities.

Sense will use the investment to build on the programmes established in London, East and West Midlands, and expand these to the North of England.

Sport England Director, Mike Diaper, said:

“Sport England work to help everyone, regardless of their age, background or level of ability, feel able to engage in sport and activity. Our research shows that disabled people are half as likely to be active, which is not right, especially as many disabled people have told us they want to be. ‘Sporting Sense’ has already helped over a thousand people with complex disabilities to get active by breaking down barriers which can prevent people from taking part, such as a lack of opportunity, support or confidence. Sport England are delighted to be able to award ‘Sporting Sense’ further funding to build on that work.”

Sense’s National Sport Manager, Alissa Ayling, said:

“We believe everyone, no matter how complex their communication needs, deserves the right to enjoy a physically active life. The ‘Sporting Sense’ project has created and developed opportunities for disabled people to participate in, and enjoy, a broad range of sporting and physical activities. This grant from Sport England will provide accessible and inclusive opportunities to individuals, in local areas where this has not yet been possible.”

 

Source: Sport England fund increase in sporting opportunities for people with complex disabilities | DisabledGo News and Blog

England CP Football Captain Jack Rutter Devastated As Rule Change Ends Career


Same Difference

England Cerebral Palsy captain Jack Rutter says he is “devastated” after a change to classification rules led to an immediate end to his career.

The 27-year-old, who also skippered ParalympicsGB’s cerebral palsy side, has accepted a coaching role with the Football Association.

Revised rules regarding the level of a player’s impairment have led to Rutter being classified as ineligible to play.

“It’ll affect teams around the world,” he told BBC Radio Gloucestershire.

“I’m absolutely devastated and I feel like I’ve lost a lot. I’m fairly fit still so I had at least another five years of playing in me.

“But I’ve got lots of opportunities available to me now and I just want to try and help the next generation now.”

Following research, the International Federation for CP football have amended the level of impairment required for a player to be eligible.

“Now any player who hasn’t got spasticity in…

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Paralympic classification scandal: MPs criticise BPA boss for six years of inaction : DisabledGo News


The head of the British Paralympic Association (BPA) has been heavily criticised by MPs for failing to address cheating within the system that classifies disabled athletes, despite being in his post for more than six years.

Tim Hollingsworth was giving evidence to the Commons digital, culture, media and sport committee, as part of its inquiry into sports governance.

He was giving evidence after the disabled peer and retired Paralympian Baroness [Tanni] Grey-Thompson had told the committee that the classification system was being abused by cheating British athletes in search of money and medals.

On the day they gave evidence to the inquiry, the committee also published a series of witness statements from retired and current athletes, their relatives, and officials, raising serious concerns about the system (see separate story).

The committee has also received evidence from athletes who have given evidence anonymously.

The classification system is run by the national governing body of each Paralympic sport, while athletes competing internationally must also submit to testing by international classifiers.

The process includes medical evidence, physical examinations and assessment of how the athlete functions in that sport, as well as observation of them in competition.

The International Paralympic Committee (IPC) defines classification as grouping athletes into different classes according to how much their impairment “affects fundamental activities” in that sport and discipline.

But misleading classifiers can allow athletes to compete against those whose impairments have a greater negative impact on attributes such as speed, coordination and strength.

Hollingsworth told the MPs that the system was the “absolute foundation stone of Paralympic sport”, and he insisted that it was fit for purpose but “can and must be improved”.

Asked if he was surprised at the number of people coming forward with similar concerns to the committee – many of them anonymously – he said again that the system could be improved.

And he said there needed to be an independent body to provide more “transparency and solidity to the process” of complaints about classification.

But he insisted that the International Paralympic Committee had put into place, in 2015, a “far more rigorous set of standards and practices” on classification.

He claimed that “if people were more understanding of that” and the wider system it might help them understand why “one athlete is freely and fairly competing against another”.

But he was later forced to admit that, although BPA would refer any classification complaint to the relevant individual sport, there were currently no procedures for his organisation to take any further action if that stage in the process proved unsuccessful.

Asked by Labour MP Ian Lucas if there should be a route for BPA to take on such a complaint, Hollingsworth said: “There should be, absolutely.”

Lucas then told him: “I find it incredible that in a multi-million pound business, which is what this is nowadays, that that process isn’t there at the minute because the integrity of this is at the heart of the sport.”

He added: “We have had a huge amount of evidence from individual athletes who do not have faith in the integrity of the system.

“These people have come to us because they haven’t felt that they could come to you. Don’t you find that depressing?”

The committee’s chair, Damian Collins, pointed out that Hollingsworth had been leading BPA for six years and told him that the problem had grown “on your watch”.

He said Hollingsworth and BPA had known about the problems with the classification system but had just “sat back and let it happen, and the people who have suffered have been the athletes and their families”.

Hollingsworth said BPA had now decided that it should be involved in developing a national classification code – which should be published next year – and a “better approach to classification at a national level” and “ultimately the development of a suitable process for complaint procedures to be dealt with independently”.

But when he claimed that complaints about the system had not previously “been made clear in the way they are today” to BPA, Collins said: “I don’t believe that and I don’t believe the people in the room believe that and I find it incredible that you say it.”

When Collins asked if Hollingsworth owed Paralympic athletes an apology for the failures in the system, he insisted that there had “not been any proven case of intentional misrepresentation” or “any evidence that has been presented that has gone beyond the circumstantial and the anecdotal”.

But Collins told him that Baroness Grey-Thompson had said the system was being abused, while athletes and families of athletes had also provided evidence about the failures, and he asked him again if he should apologise.

Hollingsworth said: “If there is genuine evidence of an athlete being failed by the system, then yes… [but] to the collective, it would be a no.”

Collins said later: “We have received evidence from athletes who feel they have been discriminated against within teams because they have raised concerns.

“Baroness Grey-Thompson [has said] that as far as she is concerned the classification system is broken and people are cheating it now, today.

“These things may not be all within your direct control, but we would look at BPA and say, you are a leading organisation for para sport in this country, and for you to recognise these failings and be a champion for putting it right, and to acknowledge and apologise to the victims of those failures, I think is something it would be appropriate for you to do.”

But Hollingsworth said: “I am genuinely sorry that there are athletes who feel that they have got grievances, but I don’t necessarily feel that those grievances necessarily are ones that are substantiated.

“I do feel very sorry indeed that we are in a position where there are athletes who feel they can’t get to a point where they are listened to satisfactorily.”

But he said he was “not apologising for failure or a belief that the system is not working as effectively as it is”.

Collins told Hollingsworth that it was “tragic” that, as with other sports, there was “no whistleblowing process, no grievance procedures, cases that have not been properly investigated, athletes have suffered as a result of trying to speak out within their sport”, and that athletes had had to use alternative means to “try to get the truth out there” because there was “no system to do so within their own sport”.

News provided by John Pring at www.disabilitynewsservice.com

 

Source : Paralympic classification scandal: MPs criticise BPA boss for six years of inaction : DisabledGo News

White House defends Trump on NFL: ‘This isn’t about being against anyone’ | TheHill


The White House on Monday defended President Trump’s war of words with the National Football League (NFL) over player protests during the national

Source: White House defends Trump on NFL: ‘This isn’t about being against anyone’ | TheHill

“It’s not just about sport, it’s about accepting people for who they are”


Scope's Blog

John Willis is the founder and Chief Executive of Power to Inspire, a charity all about inclusion through sport, based in Cambridge. He was born without fully formed arms and legs, and last year he took on a challenge to try all 34 Olympic and Paralympic sports.

In this blog he talks about changing attitudes and why sport for all is so important.

I was interested in sport from a very young age. Unfortunately, there weren’t many opportunities to get involved in sport at school.

A few years ago I was nagged by a friend into doing a Triathlon relay – I did the swim. We had a great time and it showed that disabled people and non-disabled people can do sport together, you just have to design it and think about it and adapt it.

John Willis, a disabled man with foreshortened arms and legs, waits on a diving board for the signal to dive into the pool, in front of an audience of adults and children John waiting on a diving board for the signal to dive into the…

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Can a sporting event change attitudes?


Unfortunately until the Government change their attitude towards disability there will never be an opportunity for a change for the better with the public at large , it will even be difficult to maintain the current position so a change for the worse is more likely.

While not actually saying it the Government are indicating that disabled people do not require welfare benefits and even if they do this should be for a limited period to enable them to overcome their disabilities. This could be where the Paralympics comes in for, although, this would not be the intention, the Government (DWP) appear to believe that these Paralympians do not now need benefits and if this is so for them, then it should be so for all other receivers of benefits. This is in fact not correct for it is only because they receive benefits, that they can continue to do the sports they do. without the benefits their participation in sports will eventually be decreasing until they can no longer engage in sports and then they will be back to square one.

The mainstream media go some way to make public this belief and therefore the general public think this is so for every benefit claimant, if one person can overcome their disability then so can all, so those who continue to claim benefits can only be scroungers.

Having a complex needs daughter I am well aware that she will never overcome her disability and will in effect become more disabled with the advent of time, as will many if not all others who have disabilities.

So the starting point is with the Government of the day, but unfortunately all they are contend with is making cuts, on cuts and more cuts, so eventually the number of disabled people will decrease, but only because the Government is making it impossible for them to survive.

Scope's Blog

Following our #SportForAll activity this summer and as we head towards the fifth anniversary of the London 2012 Paralympic Games. We’ve discovered that, despite the success of the games themselves, there has been little change in the way disabled people feel they are treated by society and supported by the government.

The London 2012 Paralympic Games ran between 29 August and 9 September. At the time it was Lord Coe’s view that “we would never think of disability in the same way again.”

The Games themselves saw disability given an unprecedented platform, with Paralympics GB taking home 120 medals, and para-athletes like Sarah Storey and Ellie Simmonds becoming household names.

However, our new research reveals that a quarter (28%) of disabled people did not feel the Paralympics delivered a positive legacy for disabled people once the two weeks were over. Over a third (38%) think that attitudes have not improved…

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‘A lack of toilets led me to choose surgery’ | DisabledGo News and Blog


Paralympian Anne Wafula-Strike had to wet herself on a train journey, last year, because the accessible toilet was out of order. Now, she hears from others facing similar problems. Marni Smyth has spinal muscular atrophy, and has used a power chair since she was three. She needs a hoist to get on to a toilet, and says finding accessible loos that could accommodate her needs became a daily struggle. “When I first went to university, I would avoid drinking as much as I could, because I needed to go home and leave a night out early,” she tells Anne Wafula-Strike, in the Paralympian’s report for the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme. “I’d need a hoist and plinth to get changed on, and they just weren’t .” Two years ago, she took the step of undergoing surgery for which she had no medical need. She had a suprapubic catheter fitted, so she does not have to get out of her chair to go to the toilet. She says she knows others who have also had the operation, and it has “completely changed my

Source: ‘A lack of toilets led me to choose surgery’ | DisabledGo News and Blog