Private company ‘removes free access’ to hospital bedside TVs as pandemic surges – SKWAWKBOX


All this equipment was installed some years ago on a National direction and hospitals had no choice but to accept it.

The concept was a great idea, but the relating costs to the patients who wishes to use it were exceedingly costly.

Now most patients will have a mobile phone so, should not need this equipment to obtain and make calls, but reception for phone signals in hospitals is spasmodic, meaning at times calls can’t be made or received. However, the hospital staff are very accommodating and will generally allow patients to use the ward phone on occasions, but with COVID-19 staff may be, now too busy to provide this.

So, the free use was very welcome, but for Hospedia to withdraw this facility, while they are entitled to do so, is not very customer friendly. Or was this Hospedia intention to allow usage and give patients a flavour, with the hope that these patients would then pay when the facility was withdrawn, especially without notice.

If this was so, then Hospedia are only interested in making a profit and have no concerns or thoughts for the patients.

I believe that the original contracts, which each hospital had to enter, are now due for renewal and hospitals have a choice whether to renew or not. If it was my choice then I would not renew the contract. During 2020 I was in hospital on 3 occasions and could not obtain a phone signal, but I could use the hospital free WiFi which I did as I took my laptop and others could use their mobiles or tablets through the free WiFi.

The Hospedia technology has now been superseded by personal media and therefore the need, if there ever was one, is now not required.

Going to hospital as an inpatient should not be a cause to obtain debt, which paying to use Hospedia technology could cause.

 
Private company ‘removes free access’ to hospital bedside TVs as pandemic surges – SKWAWKBOX

The curse of ‘white oil’: electric vehicles’ dirty secret | News | The Guardian


Electric vehicles are being put forward as the green future, but what is green for one could well be black for others.

With electric vehicles the dark emissions will be reduced, but to obtain essential element, such as, Lithium the green image will be distorted due to the mining practices for the lithium.

So are electric vehicles as green as they are painted, may be not, but for many the creation of mobility aids is an essential part of life, due to their disabilities and vehicles of some nature will be required.

Many other vehicles will be also be required by those to whom travel is an essential part of their job requirements and how they manage their lives.

To have your own vehicle is part of a persons independence and forms of group travel would reduce this independence considerably.

So, while electric vehicles would appear to be the answer for a more green future, more green types of fuel will be required,

Source: The curse of ‘white oil’: electric vehicles’ dirty secret | News | The Guardian

Explainer: Europe’s coronavirus smartphone contact tracing apps – Reuters


BERLIN (Reuters) – More than 20 countries and territories in Europe have launched or plan smartphone apps that seek to break the chain of coronavirus infection by tracking encounters between people and issuing a warning should one of them test positive.

 

Source: Explainer: Europe’s coronavirus smartphone contact tracing apps – Reuters

Eurozone GDP slumps by record 12.1% amid coronavirus pandemic chaos– as it happened | Business | The Guardian


Rolling live coverage of business, economics and financial markets as European economy suffers its worst contraction since at least 1995

Source: Eurozone GDP slumps by record 12.1% amid coronavirus pandemic chaos– as it happened | Business | The Guardian

Government shifts to Google-Apple model for delayed contact-tracing app in latest U-turn : The Independent


Boris Johnson’s government has ditched plans to develop a custom-made contact-tracing app in favour of a new model after the rollout was beset with problems. In a major U-turn, ministers announced a switch to technology provided by Apple and Google – abandoning an NHS model that aimed to give the health service greater access to patient data. Officials admitted the app, designed by the health service’s tech arm NHSX, was highly inaccurate, picking up just four per cent of contacts on Apple phones and 75 per cent of contacts on Android handsets. By contrast, the model designed by the tech giants picked up 99 per cent of contacts on both Android and iPhones. The shift raises questions over how much time and money was wasted pursuing a bespoke app that never materialised.

 

Source : Government shifts to Google-Apple model for delayed contact-tracing app in latest U-turn : The Independent

Workplaces are turning to devices to monitor social distancing, but does the tech respect privacy? : The Conversation


Smartphone apps and wearable devices can tell when workers have been within six feet of each other, promising to help curb the coronavirus. But they’re not all the same when it comes to privacy.

Source: Workplaces are turning to devices to monitor social distancing, but does the tech respect privacy? : The Conversation