Archives for category: technology

The government has announced it is releasing £760 million into the NHS, which includes money to improve the use of its digital programme as part of the national health body’s 70th birthday.

The Department of Health and Social Care announced the money is part of a £760 million investment to modernise and transform NHS hospitals and community services over the next 10 years.

Part of the funding includes £150 million set aside to support the NHS’s work to become more efficient.

This includes “improve the use of a digital programme that helps the NHS use its workforce better” and “improve pharmacy IT and administration systems to reduce medication errors and improve patient safety”.

The Shropshire, Telford and Wrekin sustainability and transformation partnership (STP) will also receive £300 million to transform local hospital services. It proposes to use the funding to develop an emergency care site and a separate planned care site, with 24-hour urgent care centres at both sites.

 

Source: NHS digital programme to benefit from £760m government funding : digital health

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North west-based health and lifestyle provider, LiveWire, launches the first phase of its new state-of-the-art community facility designed specifically to support people with dementia

The £16 million regeneration scheme, developed in collaboration with the University of Stirling and Warrington Disability Partnership, includes a range of dementia-friendly features such as natural and artificial lighting, new signage and floor finishes, accessible toilets and quiet room

Multi-million pound scheme – aiming to become the first public building to achieve The University of Stirling’s DSDC Gold Award for its dementia-friendly architecture and design – includes new, fully accessible fitness suite with top-of-the-range equipment, new community library, reception floor walkers and fingerprint check-in.

A new cutting edge £16 million community facility and fitness centre – hailed as one of the UK’s most dementia-friendly buildings – has opened its doors in Warrington, Cheshire.

LiveWire Warrington, the largest provider of leisure, library and lifestyle services in the town, has unveiled the first phase of its newly refurbished Great Sankey Neighbourhood Hub after an extensive 12-month redevelopment.

The new community facility and fitness hub, designed in collaboration with Walker Simpson Architects has been specifically designed to meet leading dementia-friendly standards throughout, creating a safe and welcoming environment for people living with the condition.

The building’s new state-of-the-art fitness suite includes a comprehensive selection of equipment approved by the Inclusive Fitness Initiative (IFI), and provides easy-to-use kit enabling those with Alzheimer’s to stay physically active.

 

Source: Health and wellbeing company, LiveWire, launches one of the most dementia-friendly community facilities in the UK | DisabledGo News and Blog


Travelling on public transport can be pretty stressful at the best of times.

However, for someone who is autistic, venturing on their everyday commute and facing the unknown can be an incredibly overwhelming experience.

The National Autistic Society has released a video called Diverted that shows a young autistic woman trying to remain calm while on a train surrounded by other people.

The video illustrates how things such as loud noises, flashing lights and accidental knocks with fellow passengers can trigger emotive responses from an autistic individual.

It’s been released as part of the National Autistic Society’s “Too Much Information” campaign to mark World Autism Awareness Week, which is taking place this year from March 26 until April 2.

The person cast in the lead role of the video is Saskia Lupin, a 21-year-old aspiring actor from Brighton.

Lupin is autistic and personally finds travelling on public transport extremely tough.

“I struggle a lot with the unexpected changes that can take place: they make me feel anxious, they make me panic, they make me angry but overall I feel confused, like I can’t do anything and all sense of rationality is lost,” she wrote for the Huffington Post.

 

Source: World Autism Awareness Week: Video highlights difficulties autistic people face on public transport | DisabledGo News and Blog


When Ana Macedo-Brown heard the doctor say the words she’d been dreading since finding a lump in her breast, she didn’t think things could get worse.

That was until her husband, Dave, took her hand outside the consulting room and said: ‘Well, that makes both of us. I’ve got cancer too.’

In a devastating turn of events, Dave, 64, had been diagnosed with prostate cancer, and had kept it a secret, four days before Ana, 56, his wife of 19 years, learned her news.

Six years on, Ana and Dave are cancer-free. But their shared experience sheds light on the starkly different ways in which the medical profession, and indeed wider society, treats these two types of cancer.

As the Mail revealed last month, prostate cancer is now a bigger killer in this country, with more than 11,800 men dying from the disease every year, compared with 11,400 women dying of breast cancer. Despite this, it receives half the research funding and treatments trail a decade behind.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5511869/Breast-cancer-sufferer-reveals-difference-treatment-husband.html#ixzz5A31ffdp4
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

 

Source: Wife reveals difference in treatment of breast and prostate cancer : Mail Online


A mum who opted to have her cancer-riddled arm amputated so she could see her children grow up was left stunned after finding out she doesn’t qualify for a disability grant.

Carol Haslam, from Co Meath in Ireland, has called for a rules shake-up after learning she is ineligible for a grant to adapt her car, the Irish Mirror reports.

The 38-year-old said that the Primary Medical Certificate is only granted to people who have lost one or both legs or two arms – but doesn’t apply for those who have only had one arm amputated.

Carol, who has worn a prosthetic arm since last August, has used her own funds to buy a new car and a further €2,000 to adapt the steering wheel.

Obtaining the Primary Medical Certificate would have saved her the VAT and VRT on a new car or the VAT on the adapting an Irish-sourced vehicle.

Carol was due to get part of her hand amputated after developing a rare form of sarcoma last year – a cancer so rare that she has more of a chance of winning the lottery.

However she chose to get most of her lower arm amputated to decrease the chance of the aggressive cancer returning and see her two children grow up.

But the strong willed mum was left aghast when she learned of the grant constraints while having to change her car.

 

Source: Cancer battle mum who had arm amputated to fight disease told she can’t have disability benefit | DisabledGo News and Blog


A disabled civil servant has told MPs how her career has stalled because of the failure of the IT systems in the Home Office to cope with the assistive technology she needs to do her job.

Jo-Ann Moran, a senior executive officer in the Office for Security and Counter-Terrorism, told the work and pensions select committee yesterday (Wednesday) that she had been encouraged to apply for promotion but declined to do so because of the IT problems she was facing.

She told the committee that it had been a “culture shock” to “all of a sudden be denied access” after 30 years of full-time employment.

Moran, who has a degenerative condition that affects her hearing and sight, said: “I am a top performer in my grade and I keep getting told, ‘Come on, go for it,’ but I can’t because I am just not going to be reliable.”

She added: “We just can’t get the assistive technology to work. It’s not through the [lack of] trying, it’s just about the infrastructure being able to cope with the additional technology.”

The evidence session was part of the committee’s inquiry into the role of assistive technology in improving disabled people’s employment rates.

Moran said she feared that if she applied for a job working for a minister, that minister would not be able to accommodate her if she had to say, ‘Sorry, my computer’s not working today.

Source: Home Office IT failure stalls disabled civil servant’s career, MPs hear | DisabledGo News and Blog


The Trump administration wants to turn the International Space Station into a kind of orbiting real estate venture run not by the government, but by private industry.

The White House plans to stop funding for the station after 2024, ending direct federal support of the orbiting laboratory. But it does not intend to abandon the orbiting laboratory altogether, and is working on a transition plan that could turn the station over to the private sector, according to an internal NASA document obtained by The Washington Post.

“The decision to end direct federal support for the ISS in 2025 does not imply that the platform itself will be deorbited at that time – it is possible that industry could continue to operate certain elements or capabilities of the ISS as part of a future commercial platform,” the document states. “NASA will expand international and commercial partnerships over the next seven years in order to ensure continued human access to and presence in low Earth orbit.”

 

Source: The Trump administration wants to turn the International Space Station into a commercially run venture, NASA document shows. : Washington Post


Something wonderful happened about 13.8 billion years ago. Everything in the universe was created in an instant as an infinitesimally small point of energy: the Big Bang. We know that this event happened, as the universe is constantly expanding and galaxies are moving away from us. The more we peer into the past, the smaller it gets – that’s how we know it must have once been infinitesimally small, and that there must have been a beginning.

But of course there weren’t any humans around to see how it all started. What would it have been like – what would we have seen and felt? Now new research posted on the open science repository ArXiv, has investigated the amount of light available in the newborn universe to offer some clues.

The universe may seem dark and cold now, but there is a lot of light around. Humans can see some of this, but there’s also light at frequencies that we can’t see. The night sky, for example, appears dark but in fact glows at a frequency of light invisible to human eyes. Still, we can see this light using microwave detectors and it is a light that fills space and is practically exactly the same wherever we look.

 

Source: What would it have been like to witness the beginning of the universe? : The Conversation


Beastrabban\'s Weblog

This is the Doomsday Clock set up by the Organisation of Atomic Scientists, to show graphically how close the world is to nuclear omnicide. It used to be five minutes to midnight, and I remember the New Cold War of the 1980s, when Thatcher and Reagan nearly started a nuclear conflict. As did a computer malfunction over on the Soviet side. The only way we served that is because of an heroic Red Army officer, who insisted on visual confirmation because he correctly didn’t trust machines. The man was reduced to a nervous wreck afterwards, but he’s a hero. He saved the world.

Now we’ve moved closer to full-scale nuclear war. The scientists blame Trump, his stupid remarks on Twitter, and his sparring and provocation of Kim Jong-Un.

The man’s a menace. For the safety of all humanity, and our beautiful planet, he has to go. Now.

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The rise of the machine economy risks social disruption by widening the gap between rich and poor in Britain, as automation threatens jobs generating £290bn in wages.

Jobs accounting for a third of annual pay in the UK risk being automated, according to the study by the IPPR thinktank. Warning that low-paid roles are in the greatest danger, it urged ministers to head off the prospect of rising inequality by helping people retrain and share in the benefits from advances in technology.

The study for the IPPR’s commission on economic justice, which features senior business and public figures including the archbishop of Canterbury, called on the government to take a greater role in managing the adoption of robotics, artificial intelligence and other methods of job automation in the workforce.

Mathew Lawrence, a senior research fellow at the IPPR, said: “Managed badly, the benefits of automation could be narrowly concentrated, benefiting those who own capital and highly skilled workers. Inequality would spiral.”

The IPPR estimates that 44% of jobs in the UK economy could feasibly be automated, equating to more than 13.7 million people who together earn about £290bn. Although it doesn’t give a forecast for how long this would take, it cited US research which estimates the changes could occur over the next 10 or 20 years. From the collective pay pool worth £290bn, middle-income jobs such as call-centre workers, secretaries and factory workers are likely to be hollowed out. Low-skilled workers could also lose their jobs or face fewer hours from greater levels of automation. At the same time the highest earners and workers able to retrain will gain higher pay thanks to rising productivity – which

 

Source: UK’s poorest to fare worst in age of automation, thinktank warns : The Guardian

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