Archives for category: technology

A mum who opted to have her cancer-riddled arm amputated so she could see her children grow up was left stunned after finding out she doesn’t qualify for a disability grant.

Carol Haslam, from Co Meath in Ireland, has called for a rules shake-up after learning she is ineligible for a grant to adapt her car, the Irish Mirror reports.

The 38-year-old said that the Primary Medical Certificate is only granted to people who have lost one or both legs or two arms – but doesn’t apply for those who have only had one arm amputated.

Carol, who has worn a prosthetic arm since last August, has used her own funds to buy a new car and a further €2,000 to adapt the steering wheel.

Obtaining the Primary Medical Certificate would have saved her the VAT and VRT on a new car or the VAT on the adapting an Irish-sourced vehicle.

Carol was due to get part of her hand amputated after developing a rare form of sarcoma last year – a cancer so rare that she has more of a chance of winning the lottery.

However she chose to get most of her lower arm amputated to decrease the chance of the aggressive cancer returning and see her two children grow up.

But the strong willed mum was left aghast when she learned of the grant constraints while having to change her car.

 

Source: Cancer battle mum who had arm amputated to fight disease told she can’t have disability benefit | DisabledGo News and Blog

Advertisements

A disabled civil servant has told MPs how her career has stalled because of the failure of the IT systems in the Home Office to cope with the assistive technology she needs to do her job.

Jo-Ann Moran, a senior executive officer in the Office for Security and Counter-Terrorism, told the work and pensions select committee yesterday (Wednesday) that she had been encouraged to apply for promotion but declined to do so because of the IT problems she was facing.

She told the committee that it had been a “culture shock” to “all of a sudden be denied access” after 30 years of full-time employment.

Moran, who has a degenerative condition that affects her hearing and sight, said: “I am a top performer in my grade and I keep getting told, ‘Come on, go for it,’ but I can’t because I am just not going to be reliable.”

She added: “We just can’t get the assistive technology to work. It’s not through the [lack of] trying, it’s just about the infrastructure being able to cope with the additional technology.”

The evidence session was part of the committee’s inquiry into the role of assistive technology in improving disabled people’s employment rates.

Moran said she feared that if she applied for a job working for a minister, that minister would not be able to accommodate her if she had to say, ‘Sorry, my computer’s not working today.

Source: Home Office IT failure stalls disabled civil servant’s career, MPs hear | DisabledGo News and Blog


The Trump administration wants to turn the International Space Station into a kind of orbiting real estate venture run not by the government, but by private industry.

The White House plans to stop funding for the station after 2024, ending direct federal support of the orbiting laboratory. But it does not intend to abandon the orbiting laboratory altogether, and is working on a transition plan that could turn the station over to the private sector, according to an internal NASA document obtained by The Washington Post.

“The decision to end direct federal support for the ISS in 2025 does not imply that the platform itself will be deorbited at that time – it is possible that industry could continue to operate certain elements or capabilities of the ISS as part of a future commercial platform,” the document states. “NASA will expand international and commercial partnerships over the next seven years in order to ensure continued human access to and presence in low Earth orbit.”

 

Source: The Trump administration wants to turn the International Space Station into a commercially run venture, NASA document shows. : Washington Post


Something wonderful happened about 13.8 billion years ago. Everything in the universe was created in an instant as an infinitesimally small point of energy: the Big Bang. We know that this event happened, as the universe is constantly expanding and galaxies are moving away from us. The more we peer into the past, the smaller it gets – that’s how we know it must have once been infinitesimally small, and that there must have been a beginning.

But of course there weren’t any humans around to see how it all started. What would it have been like – what would we have seen and felt? Now new research posted on the open science repository ArXiv, has investigated the amount of light available in the newborn universe to offer some clues.

The universe may seem dark and cold now, but there is a lot of light around. Humans can see some of this, but there’s also light at frequencies that we can’t see. The night sky, for example, appears dark but in fact glows at a frequency of light invisible to human eyes. Still, we can see this light using microwave detectors and it is a light that fills space and is practically exactly the same wherever we look.

 

Source: What would it have been like to witness the beginning of the universe? : The Conversation


Beastrabban\'s Weblog

This is the Doomsday Clock set up by the Organisation of Atomic Scientists, to show graphically how close the world is to nuclear omnicide. It used to be five minutes to midnight, and I remember the New Cold War of the 1980s, when Thatcher and Reagan nearly started a nuclear conflict. As did a computer malfunction over on the Soviet side. The only way we served that is because of an heroic Red Army officer, who insisted on visual confirmation because he correctly didn’t trust machines. The man was reduced to a nervous wreck afterwards, but he’s a hero. He saved the world.

Now we’ve moved closer to full-scale nuclear war. The scientists blame Trump, his stupid remarks on Twitter, and his sparring and provocation of Kim Jong-Un.

The man’s a menace. For the safety of all humanity, and our beautiful planet, he has to go. Now.

View original post


The rise of the machine economy risks social disruption by widening the gap between rich and poor in Britain, as automation threatens jobs generating £290bn in wages.

Jobs accounting for a third of annual pay in the UK risk being automated, according to the study by the IPPR thinktank. Warning that low-paid roles are in the greatest danger, it urged ministers to head off the prospect of rising inequality by helping people retrain and share in the benefits from advances in technology.

The study for the IPPR’s commission on economic justice, which features senior business and public figures including the archbishop of Canterbury, called on the government to take a greater role in managing the adoption of robotics, artificial intelligence and other methods of job automation in the workforce.

Mathew Lawrence, a senior research fellow at the IPPR, said: “Managed badly, the benefits of automation could be narrowly concentrated, benefiting those who own capital and highly skilled workers. Inequality would spiral.”

The IPPR estimates that 44% of jobs in the UK economy could feasibly be automated, equating to more than 13.7 million people who together earn about £290bn. Although it doesn’t give a forecast for how long this would take, it cited US research which estimates the changes could occur over the next 10 or 20 years. From the collective pay pool worth £290bn, middle-income jobs such as call-centre workers, secretaries and factory workers are likely to be hollowed out. Low-skilled workers could also lose their jobs or face fewer hours from greater levels of automation. At the same time the highest earners and workers able to retrain will gain higher pay thanks to rising productivity – which

 

Source: UK’s poorest to fare worst in age of automation, thinktank warns : The Guardian


Germans, Danes and Belgians pay the most for their electricity in Europe, followed by households on the Iberian peninsula, according to data from Eurostat.

 In Germany and Denmark 100 kilowatt-hours of electricity costs on average €30.5, compared with prices as low as €6.60 in Serbia. One kilowatt hour is about enough to watch TV for around 3 hours or to run a washing machine for one cycle.

When the figures are adjusted to take into account different spending power across the countries, Germany retains the top spot although Portugal climbs into second place.

 

Source: Which European countries have the most expensive electricity? : euronews


As with many systems, especially those imposed by Government, they may have ideal outcomes, but the thought process to create the systems is not fit for purpose, it is underfunded, not sufficiently staff resources by numbers and aptitude. They also do not have the claimants or beneficiaries rights and needs as the primary basis, not person centred.

This is evident no matter which party is in power, as the real power brokers are the civil servants behind the elected MPs and Ministers. These are the people who are there irrespective of who is in assumed power.

Yes, Minister and Yes, Prime Minister, while comedy sitcoms were more realistic than many of the population believe.

As to the payment periods, why, in this day and age, cannot the current benefits be paid and then just changed on the day the new benefit become effective, we are after all in the computer age and with the right programming anything should be possible.

The ramblings of a former DWP Civil Servant ...

“Restoring parity with the tax credit system by reinvesting £3bn a year into universal credit is essential, not only to protect living standards but also to prevent universal credit’s brand becoming synonymous with such major cuts, resulting in significant opposition to roll-out,” it says.

Public confidence in universal credit will collapse without an urgent £3bn cash injection to reverse cuts that are set to leave millions of families worse off, an influential thinktank has warned.

The Resolution Foundation says a spree of Treasury-driven welfare cuts since 2015 has left universal credit unable to meet its original aims of strengthening work incentives and supporting the incomes of low-income families.

It warns that the current fragile political consensus in support of universal credit risks breaking down unless ministers refinance the reform and fix multiple design and implementation problems.

The original universal credit vision of merging six benefits into one to create a…

View original post 624 more words


What a tangled web they weave and those that suffer are the people of Puerto Rico.

There is more than a hint of corruption, which appears to start with the Governor of Puerto Rico, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke and others. The Trump administration should, if they were concerned for the residents of Puerto Rico, a state of the US, look into this as there appears to be a serious fishy smell or hint of corruption. Trump himself could gain some credibility by having this investigated, but will he.

Phil Ebersole's Blog

The Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA) has canceled its outrageous no-bid $300 million contract with Whitefish Energy Holdings, which, among other things, forbid federal and Puerto Rican authorities to audit its labor costs and profit and had no penalties for failure to meet project deadlines.

But questions remain: Why was the contract granted in the first place?  And what is PREPA going to do next to restore power?

The whole thing reminds me of the contracts for reconstruction of Iraq.   After the invasion, American and other foreign companies were given lucrative, no-bid contracts to rebuild Iraq’s electrical systems, other public utilities and physical infrastructure.   Well-qualified Iraqi companies and workers were cut out of the process.

The result was that a lot of government contractors made a lot of money and very little reconstruction took place.   I can see the same thing happening with Puerto Rico—maybe a little less brazenly…

View original post 399 more words


Disabled campaigners and their allies have called on the transport secretary to restore “vital” government funding for projects to improve access to rail stations across England, Wales and Scotland. In a letter signed by more than 50 organisations, Transport for All (TfA) – which campaigns for an accessible transport system – calls on Chris Grayling to restore tens of millions of pounds of funding for the Access for All scheme that has been deferred by the government. The letter says that deferring half of all planned Access for All projects means that the “already slow progress on rail access has all but ground to a halt”. The decision by the chair of Network Rail – later rubber-stamped by Grayling – to cut Access for All funding for 2014-19 from £102 million to £55 million, with the rest carried over to 2019-24, was first revealed by Disability News Service last year. The letter has been sent as Grayling is due today (Thursday) to announce future levels of Network Rail funding, which

Source: DPOs call on transport secretary to restore Access for All funding | DisabledGo News and Blog

The Wolfe Review

Philosophy, literature, religious and cultural studies. A love for knowledge.

Who By Fire

High ordeals and common trials

mydaftlife

the funny stuff that happens

WordPress Video Series

Learn How To Dominate Your Dreams, Make Money Quick and Easy!

Arinuck ptl

Praising the Lord, the King of Kings, Jesus Christ! Having Joy!

Declaration Of Opinion

{Mark Catlin's Blog} Agitate, Educate and Organise

Neurodivergent Rebel

Rebelling against a culture that values assimilation over individuality.

The Bipolar Writer

James Edgar Skye

ItzaSpectrum of Vocations

I am an ADHD woman who's view of life and many Special-Needs issues tends to be a more positive one than most, WITHOUT ignoring the challenges. Welcome, come in, look around and stay a while!

PATRICK REAL STORIES

make PEACE show LOVE

This Beautiful Life

Find yourself, and be just that

emotionspassion.com

emotional musings- emotionspassion@gmail.com

Education Motivation Inspiration

Warm welcome! This is more than an exploration. Discovery of new ideas and new ways of being.

to aspie or not to aspie

I’m just a girl, standing in front of the NHS, asking it to assess her for autism

SouL SpeakS

He started Writing, The paper started speaking...

Special Needs Siblings

Together Is All We Need

%d bloggers like this: