Disabled comedian left trapped on board train after it leaves


This is a travesty and completely against what should be in the Equality Act 2010. How can one human being be treated like this and by a, so called, nationised industry.

Those who want whole scale re-nationalisation hold LNER as an example, but an example of what, it appears total inequality.

It would appear that reasonable adjustments need to be made, like providing all disabiled people who travel on public transport some form of immediate communication to stop this occurring again.

Why can not these incidents be treated as a’Hate Crime’.

‘spokesman for LNER told the BBC: “We are very sorry for the unacceptable experience Ms Davis had whilst travelling with us.

“We are fully investigating the incident to understand what went wrong and to ensure that lessons are learnt for the future.”  But will they, how many times over many years have these words ‘lessons are learnt ‘ been mentioned, but are they, well, if they are you can count them on ‘one’ finger.

Govt Newspeak

Tanyalee Davis taken 50 miles out of way, days after she was ‘harassed’ over using a disabled space on another train

Tanyalee Davis with hosts Eamonn Holmes and Ruth Langford on ITV’s This Morning show after the first incident.

A comedian who felt “harassed and humiliated” for using a disabled space on a train for her mobility scooter, prompting an apology from the operating company, has had yet another bad experience on the railways.

Tanyalee Davis was en route to York for a show and, although she had already spoken to staff to ensure she would be helped off the London North Eastern Railway (LNER) train, no one came to assist – meaning she had to stay on board until Darlington, 50 miles away.

Canadian-born Davis, 47, who has a form of dwarfism, was ordered to vacate the disabled space on a GWR train earlier this week.

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‘Scandal’ of new rail station set to be built without step-free access to trains | DisabledGo News and Blog


A new rail station being built as part of a multi-billion pound regeneration programme will not enable wheelchair-users to board trains without the help of staff and a ramp, disabled campaigners have warned.

Brent Cross West Thameslink is being built as part of the £4.5 billion Cricklewood Brent Cross development in north-west London, a partnership between Barnet council and the private sector.

But current plans for the station, which is due to open in 2022, are that it will be step-free from the entrance to the platform, but not from the platform to the train.

This appears to be because building the higher platforms necessary for wheelchair-users to board trains without manual ramps and assistance would mean freight trains would have to slow down when passing those higher platforms.

Campaigners believe that although most freight trains will pass through the station’s dedicated freight platform, some will be routed through passenger platforms, and it could delay the passenger services behind them if they are forced to slow down.

The controversy could prove embarrassing for Govia Thameslink Railway, the company which will run Thameslink services through the station.

 

Source: ‘Scandal’ of new rail station set to be built without step-free access to trains | DisabledGo News and Blog

Tommy Robinson supporters abuse female Muslim bus driver – but her response is inspiring – Mirror Online


A female Muslim bus driver had an inspiring response after Tommy Robinson supporters shouted abuse at her during a demonstration over the weekend.

Twelve people were arrested as thousands protested in support of US President Donald Trump and UK far-right leader Tommy Robinson.

Shocking images show a shirtless man shouting and holding his two fingers up at the driver as he stands in front of the bus in Trafalgar Square.

The demonstrators surrounded the bus and were seen banging on the windows while holding signs that read “Free Tommy Robinson” and “Britain loves Trump”.

 

Source: Tommy Robinson supporters abuse female Muslim bus driver – but her response is inspiring – Mirror Online

Renata Jones: Shared space works for no one | Conservative Home


Cllr Renata Jones is a councillor in Charnwood.

The first I ever heard of the shared space concept was seeing one materialise in Leicester city centre. It just sprung up one day, at the newly named Jubilee Square. Formerly known as St Nicholas circle, I still feel the need to smirk a little whenever I hear or feel forced to use what still feels like the new name for this area, although we’re now a few years on.

Having worked near said square when I first heard it was to change, I asked around and read some more. I heard concerns of fellow workers and some business owners in the area. I found info on the council website. I responded to a consultation. Knowing how slippery council can be perceived to be, I demanded in doing so that I get a receipt of my consultation response, and notification of when the meeting to discuss it would be, and copy minutes of any outcome. I got an email receipt acknowledging my consultation related response. I had thought I’d go to the city council and watch the debate, but I was never told when it was debated. Nor was I sent related meeting minutes. Work just began one day to change the square.

Despite voicing concerns at the plans, I never anticipated just how odd it would be when finished. A deliberately undulating lawn created what could perhaps aspirationally be called a ‘design feature’ to an architect or garden designer, or perhaps injury or death trap by a health and safety officer. Parts of the lawn had one meter high cliff edges. High enough to do enough damage if you fell off onto the concrete below, but shallow enough that it’d look flat if you walked along head up instead of down. I tried asking the council if there’d been accidents as a result of this soon after creation, only one report I believe they said at the time. Observers frequenting nearby establishments told me they’d seen three the first day Heras fencing was taken away, two pedestrians and a cyclist. Sounded more painful somehow for the cyclist, given related speed of travel.

 

Source: Renata Jones: Shared space works for no one | Conservative Home

Minister lauds £600,000 for rail access… after her department confirms £47 million in cuts | DisabledGo News and Blog


A transport minister has announced £600,000 funding for seven digital projects to help disabled passengers access rail travel, days after her department confirmed another minister had rubber-stamped tens of millions of pounds in cuts to a separate rail access scheme.

Nusrat Ghani, the transport accessibility minister, said this week that the seven “innovative, high-tech schemes” to improve access to rail travel for disabled passengers would share the £600,000 funding.

The successful schemes include a mobile phone app to help station staff prioritise requests for support from disabled passengers; a website to help disabled passengers navigate transport interchanges; a study of how well frontline rail staff understand invisible impairments; and an app that aims to make rail travel easier for users of British Sign Language.

The seven schemes succeeded in a competition run by the Rail Safety and Standards Board.

Ghani said: “I am determined to make sure that our railways are accessible to everyone, and that we remove any barriers faced by people with a disability.”

But her announcement came only days after her own department finally confirmed to Disability News Service that it had rubber-stamped cuts of tens of millions of pounds to its Access for All rail station access improvement programme.

Two years ago, the chair of Network Rail, Sir Peter Hendy, published a report on “replanning” his organisation’s investment programme for 2014-19 across England and Wales.

He recommended that funding for the Access for All station improvement programme should be cut by nearly £50 million, from £102 million to £55 million (in addition to another £32 million carried over from uncompleted work in 2009-14).

The rest of the funding was to be carried over to 2019-24, but with no guarantee that it would not be used to disguise lower spending on access improvements in future years.

 

Source: Minister lauds £600,000 for rail access… after her department confirms £47 million in cuts | DisabledGo News and Blog

Ground-breaking co-production report ‘creates blueprint for national change’ | DisabledGo News and Blog


A “ground-breaking” report on co-production has created a blueprint for disabled people’s organisations (DPOs) across the country to push for change from their own local authorities.

Disabled campaigners yesterday called for the report of the Hammersmith and Fulham Disabled People’s Commission to be shared with other local authorities and DPOs.

Speaking at its launch in west London, they said other councils should follow the example of Labour-run Hammersmith and Fulham council, which commissioned the report.

Nothing About Disabled People Without Disabled People focuses on how to remove the barriers disabled people face in the London borough by embedding a culture of genuine co-production within the council.

Among the barriers that disabled residents told the commission about were disability hate crime; inaccessible shops and public transport; social isolation; a shortage of accessible housing; a lack of support for inclusive education; benefits cuts and poverty; and cuts to social care and support.

All the commission’s 10 members were disabled people, and their eight recommendations have each been accepted in full by the council.

The commission spent more than a year examining research, running surveys for residents, council staff and councillors, and holding meetings and public events.

Among their recommendations, they call for the council to work in genuine co-production with disabled residents; to introduce an accessible communication strategy to promote co-production across the borough; to produce a new co-production budget; and to develop a long-term strategy for funding DPOs in the borough.

Tracey Lazard, chief executive of Inclusion London, a user-led organisation which supports DPOs across the capital, said that none of the “same old consultations and listening exercises” carried out by other councils even came close to what was happening in Hammersmith and Fulham.

 

Source: Ground-breaking co-production report ‘creates blueprint for national change’ | DisabledGo News and Blog

What the Victorians did for Sheffield – left us lovely gardens – The Star


As Reg said in The Life Of Brian: “All right, but apart from the sanitation, the medicine, education, wine, public order, irrigation, roads, the fresh water system, and public health, what have the Romans ever done for us?”

The same could be said of the Victorians, with canals, transport, railways, buildings and gardens, writes Vin Malone.

The Victorian age, of industrial revolution and squalid city slums, was also the age of a popular explosion of interest in that most British of pastimes, gardening.

Prior to the Victorians’ insatiable search for new plants and trees, the gardens that the working class cultivated was more or less non-existent.
In the countryside you could see the original cottage gardens where agricultural workers had a small garden to grow flowers and vegetables but the town dwellers didn’t even have a window box.

The Victorians did change all that with botanists travelling to the far-flung reaches of the world to bring back rare plants, of which some turned out to be invasive and now are a big problem.

The well-to-do Victorians in the towns and cities jumped at the chance to have the exotic plants and trees in their gardens.

From this surge in the interest in gardening, a concerted effort was made by authorities to provide extensive public gardens.

There was a reason for this benevolent behaviour by the well-to-do.

writes Vin Malone.

 

Source: What the Victorians did for Sheffield – left us lovely gardens – The Star

I’ve been left on trains and called ‘a wheelchair’ – train companies need to improvfully e their treatment of disabled customers


A case in question showing how it is and this is not the exception, but the norm.

Disabled people have a right to be treated equally as with everyone else, they are not the problem. The problem is Society and those who should be there to assist.

The Disability Discrimination Act 2005 (DDA) and amended by the Equality Act 2010 provided access conditions on businesses and operators to provide equal access for persons with disabilities so they can live their lives on a similar basis to those of us who do not have disabilities.

But these acts gave so many concessions to businesses and operators so that in many instances there did not, fully, have to comply.

It is some 13 years since the DDA and some 8 years since the Equality Act, surely sufficient time for all businesses and operators to provide equal access. Why should a person with disabilities have to make extensive plans ahead of venturing out when people with no disabilities can do this, virtually on the spur of the moment.

This is not right and should not be allowed to occur.

Come on the UK, for goodness sakes get your Acts together.

Scope's Blog

This week, BBC Rip Off Britain highlights the experience of disabled passengers on trains. Far too often, inaccessible transport stops disabled people from enjoying the same opportunities as everyone else. In some cases, people have been through stressful and upsetting incidents – from train staff forgetting them to being treated like an object. In this blog, Steph shares her experiences. 

Every day across the UK 100s of disabled people are left stranded on train platforms. As a wheelchair user, I use trains frequently to go to work and to socialise. But, of course, the one thing that I’m constantly aware of when travelling is accessibility.

When it comes to train travel, both locally and nationally, train companies have issues with the way that they deal with disabled people.

If you’re disabled, you always have to plan ahead

I have to plan my journey before I go anywhere in ways that non-disabled…

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‘Multi-millionaire footballer’ calls woman a ‘black slave’ then brags to police: ‘I’m not some civilian’ – Mirror Online


This is the shocking moment a train passenger called a woman a “black slave” before bragging to police “I’m a multi-millionaire footballer”.

Union official Jenna Davis recorded the abuse she received on her phone.

The incident took place on a Virgin train to Birmingham and began when the man was accused of throwing chips at Jenna, who then confronted him, Birmingham Mail reports.

The footage shows the man verbally abusing Jenna, a workplace organiser for GMB Union.

As well as calling her a black slave, he is also alleged to have called her a “black wolf”.

 

Source: ‘Multi-millionaire footballer’ calls woman a ‘black slave’ then brags to police: ‘I’m not some civilian’ – Mirror Online

Anger as wheelchair users left unable to ride trains on major route | Govt Newspeak


TransPennine Express accused of ripping up disability discrimination legislation

A woman in a wheelchair in a park

Wheelchair users will not be allowed to travel on a third of trains on a major route in northern England this summer following the temporary reintroduction of 45-year-old carriages.

The main rail workers’ union accused TransPennine Express (TPE) of flouting disability discrimination legislation and in effect operating a heritage railway by bringing back into service Mark 3 trains that were built in the 1970s for British Rail.

Documents leaked to the Disability News Service show that wheelchairs will not be able to travel on 12 of the 34 hourly services to and from Liverpool and Scarborough via Manchester Victoria, Huddersfield, Leeds and York.

The documents say there will be “no space on the train for wheelchairs” and that “the trains will run without wheelchair or cycle provision”.

 

Source: Anger as wheelchair users left unable to ride trains on major route | Govt Newspeak