Should Creationism be taught in schools?


I believe we all should live in harmony with each and in doing so we should all respect the views of each other. Whether there is a God or not or which religion we follow is up to each individual and no other persons or organisation should decide otherwise.

Religions are beliefs and not a matter of fact and should never be held to be based on facts. Many of the religious scriptures were written many years after the events with no proof they occurred except for hearsay.

If religion make you feel good or not is up to the individual and not any other.

Respect each other and their beliefs, but do not dictate these to others, leave this to individual choice.

By all mean advise children the different religions but no one should say one is better or not than the other. Children should be allowed to make up their own minds, but they should be taught respect, understanding, compassion and that we all have a right to live our own lives, provided we all abide by the laws of the land.

Opher's World

There are many people who believe that the world is 6000 years old. Should we allow them to teach this to our children as a fact?

There are many people who believe that evolution is nonsense. Should we allow them to tell our children that it is nonsense?

There are many people who think god put fossils in the rocks. Should we allow them to tell our children that this is what happened?

There are many people who believe there is a god. Should they be allowed to tell our children that god is a fact?

There are many people who believe that their religion is right and all the others are wrong. Should they be allowed to tell our children that their religion is the only right one?

There are many people who believe that the Old Testament, or New Testament, or the Koran, or the Upanishads, or the…

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Is religion defunct in this day and age?


My own views on religions are contained in my post from 2012, Religions, what are they for? and in many ways my thoughts have not changed.

So I do not wish to remove any religions from today’s world, but they all do need to reflect how their supposed original teachings or basic concepts relate to the world as it is now. None should debase the others and their followers need to act accordingly as tolerance and understanding of others points of view should be, always, the way forward.

PEACE

Opher's World

The three Abrahamic religions started up way back in the dawn of time – in a time of medieval ignorance.

Judaism has its roots 3000 years ago.

Christianity 2000 years ago.

Islam 1500 years ago.

They originated in nomadic tribes of Arabs in a small area of the Middle East renowned for its many sects and religious fanatics.

They all claim that ‘God’ spoke to their originator when they were alone in a cave, up a mountain or in the wilderness – with no witnesses.

None of the originators wrote anything down.

The writings in the holy books were either accumulated from the prevailing genesis stories or myths or written down generations later from accounts passed down by word of mouth. Yet the adherents claim they are the exact word of God (despite the inconsistencies, obvious social context pertaining to that Arab culture, ambiguities and contradictions).

These holy words have…

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Mom Horrified By Toddler’s Public Tantrum Until Old Lady Said 5 Simple Words.


Parents know: Tantrums are the worst. If you’re nodding your head knowingly, then you’ve seen/tip-toed your way through more than […]

Source: Mom Horrified By Toddler’s Public Tantrum Until Old Lady Said 5 Simple Words.

What have you learnt as a child?


Otrazhenie

If a child lives with criticism
He learns to condemn.

If a child lives with hostility
He learns to fight.

If a child lives with ridicule
He learns to be shy.

If a child lives with tolerance
He learns to be patient.

If a child lives with encouragement
He learns confidence.

If a child lives with praise
He learns to appreciate.

If a child lives with fairness
He learns justice.

If a child lives with security
He learns faith.

If a child lives with approval
He learns to like himself.

If a child lives with acceptance and friendship
He learns to find love in the world.. !

What have you learnt as a child?


ENDS

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#Nigeria Decides 2015


In deed be happy and proud.

Madamsabi's Blog

I am happy and proud to be a Nigerian at a time like this. A time where the incumbent president congratulates his opponent who is defeating him at the polls even before the final results where released!

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Before now, it is ‘unafrican’ for the incumbent president to congratulate his opponent even before the final results have been announced. I am proud of President Goodluck Jonathan who is ready to vacate his office come May 29th 2015 because the people say so!

Most African incumbent presidents will rig the elections to their favor and when that does not work, he will cancel the elections and throw the country into confusion and war in many cases. But GEJ has been man enough to call and congratulate his major opponent at the polls. This shows that he has accepted the wish of the Nigerian people that they want a change of leadership.

The…

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Why parents want to believe in a vaccine conspiracy


Original post from The Washington Post

‘….. March 6 at 7:00 PM

Susan Senator lives in Brookline, Mass.

For the first three years of my son’s life, I lived a kind of “Gaslight” experience. Sometimes everything seemed fine. But other times, ordinary activities such as piling him into the stroller and going to the park would feel odd somehow, false. Something was not right, but I could not say what or why. I felt as though I was playing the part of mommy, while the real me was clenched up somewhere in the background, nauseated with an unnamed fear for my son.

Nat had autism, but I didn’t know it. It was 1993 when he was diagnosed, and no one in my circle had a child with autism or even really knew what it was. When I had Nat evaluated, I asked whether I had caused it. “Oh, no, no one believes that anymore,” the doctor said, soothing me with his pragmatic, scientific manner. “Autism is neurological, genetic most likely.”

I was grateful to hear this, but only for a little while, because the real problem was still autism. Around the time Nat turned 8, he hit a rough patch that lasted years. He stopped sleeping on any kind of regular nighttime schedule, and he began to exhibit all sorts of difficult behaviors — false, maniacal laughter, hitting and pinching, breaking things. I didn’t know how to get him to calm down, and I feared for his safety. And because so little was known about autism, no one could really help us. In a way, I found myself back at the beginning, researching the condition, trying to figure out why. Why Nat? Why me?

When I came across the theory that the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine could cause autism, it made a kind of Old World sense to me. From what I could gather, it sounded as though the vaccine might blow apart some young children’s immune systems, making them susceptible to all kinds of conditions. I was so worn down, so miserable in those days that I was desperate to believe there was a culprit, something or someone to blame. It was a relief to think that the problem wasn’t my DNA but an outside aggressor, a mistake caused by the medical establishment’s hubris.

 I wondered, if this is true, what should I do? Shouldn’t I sue someone? Kill someone, even? I felt suffocated by anger and horror and also by not knowing what to do next. But the more I thought it through, the less clarity I had.

My husband and my mother told me I had to move on, for how could we ever really know whether the vaccine was the cause? I heard them. I also heard the whisper of those very early days with Nat, when doubt needled me. Something had been off — subtle, but there — before his vaccinations.

So I did more research, and I learned that scientific organizations around the world — including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health — had proved the vaccine theory false. No one could say for sure what caused autism, but they certainly could say that it wasn’t a vaccine.

In hindsight, it’s easy to understand why some parents of children with autism want to see conspiracy and evil where none exists. Living with a person with autism can be devastatingly difficult, and learning that truth about vaccines didn’t really help me. Autism seemed to have stolen my son, and he was getting worse. He’d been expelled from school for his aggression. I needed help, and his therapists kept quitting because they were afraid of him. I was afraid of him. I was sick of my life.

I hung on, of course. Spring came. Somewhere I found the strength to keep my family together and to try one or two new things with Nat, such as signing him up for a Special Olympics gymnastics team. Nat started to do better. Nothing earth-shattering, but he was communicating a little more, and he seemed a bit more tolerant of other people. It was the first time I experienced coming through a bad time, finding a light at the end of the tunnel, with Nat.

Now I look back and see that something was indeed shifting in Nat — and in me. Maybe one influenced the other: He felt my happiness, he grew confident, he succeeded at more things and felt my approval. The change was gradual. Yet it was also all at once. I remember one heart-stopping moment when we shared a laugh on the living room couch, and his warm eyes held mine for a sliver of a second. I knew he was in there, and that was enough.

I didn’t get a perfect kid or a perfect life. No one does. But when you’re a young, scared parent, you will grasp at anything to make sense of a hardship such as autism. I know that firsthand. But the MMR vaccine does not cause autism. And more important, autism is not the only tough thing that can happen in this life. A return of deadly diseases kept at bay by vaccines would be far worse.

 Whatever caused Nat’s autism did not crush him. He is all there. Still very autistic but growing toward the light nevertheless.  …………….’