Warning that tens of thousands will go without much needed care and support in 2018 | Care Industry News


Social care could pass the point of no return in 2018 unless the Government orders emergency action to support the sector ahead of any reforms arising from its promised green paper.

Directors of adult social services are warning that tens of thousands more older and disabled people will go without the support they need next year – and many working adults will have to give up jobs to help care for their parents – if urgent steps are not taken to back the sector with special interim funding and a new national strategy to recruit and retain care workers and nurses for nursing homes.

So many organisations that provide care are quitting the sector because of low returns and severe recruitmentproblems that directors fear the damage will become irreversible in 2018.

Margaret Willcox, President of the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services (ADASS), said: “We eagerly await the green paper on support of older people and the extensive reforms that are needed to place social care on a sustainable long-term footing. But we must have action in the short term to ensure that the system can survive.

“The crisis facing us is so acute that we fear social care could pass the point of no return in 2018 while we wait for decisions to be made.”

 

Source: Warning that tens of thousands will go without much needed care and support in 2018 | Care Industry News

What about the carers and loved ones presents at Christmas asks The Purple Angel founder | Care Industry News


Prolific on social media he spends his time talking about dementia, changing people’s opinions and furthering the course for people to live well with dementia. A fight that can only be won with public support.

The Purple Angel campaign is now recognised across the globe.

Norman or Norrms as he prefers to be called sent Care Industry News a comment on living with dementia and the people he works with; particularly at Christmas.

“I sit and often think that a lot of the time it’s the loved ones who miss out at Christmas, the carers and those who make sure we, with dementia, are ok, so how can we help at this special time? Well here`s one way I hope ….

“If you know someone who has dementia this Christmas and is living with a wife, husband, loved one, family member or carers please ask them what their spouse used to like or do etc. when they were younger.  This disease is all about short term memory but most of us can remember way, way back with clarity. Once they have told you, it might be something like favourite sweets, songs, singers etc.

“Then, all you have to do without the spouse, person who hasn’t got dementia etc. knowing is to go, out and buy that as a present, wrap it and put under tree and wait until Christmas day.

“Can you imagine the person with dementia giving such a present to a loved one, especially when it’s something they both used to do, or listen to, or cherish together?? And how amazing that would be? Imagine the look on their faces when they receive this and ask WHO GOT THIS?? And you say MY DAD did, or my MUM did or whoever has dementia did?? How wonderful would that be?

 

Source: What about the carers and loved ones presents at Christmas asks The Purple Angel founder | Care Industry News

New figures from Age UK show our social care system is disintegrating | Care Industry News


New figures from Age UK reveal the shocking extent to which millions of older people are being left to prop up the country’s disintegrating care system, with those aged 65 and over providing nearly 54 million hours of unpaid care each week in England in 2016[i].

These figures highlight the rising demands being placed on older informal carers as Government underfunding causes the social care safety net to shrink, resulting in increasing numbers of our older population in need of care, being thrown back on their own and their family’s resources.

In 2015/16, over two and a quarter million (2,299,200) people aged 65 and over provided care – a 16.6 per cent increase on five years ago when 1,829,200 did so[ii],[iii].

Over 400,000 (404,400) of these unpaid carers are from the oldest demographic in our society (aged 80 and over), and they provided 12.7 million hours of care in 2015/16 – a 12.7 per cent increase from 2009/10[iv],[v].

Most older people willingly take on the task of helping to care for a loved one – usually but not always a husband or wife – and don’t think of themselves as doing anything out of the ordinary. However, leaving older people to shoulder too much, or sometimes all of the responsibility and hard work of looking after someone in declining health and with significant care needs is unfair. It can also put these older family carers’ own health at risk, and many of them are coping with health problems themselves.

Over half (54.8 per cent) of people aged 65 and over who provide at least one hour of care have a long-standing illness or disability – equating to well over a million people (1,262,500), or one in ten (10.7%) of all these family carers

 

Source: New figures from Age UK show our social care system is disintegrating | Care Industry News

Disabled man left for two years in unsuitable short-stay accommodation let down by council | Care Industry News


A young man with special educational needs has been left in short-stay accommodation for nearly two years because social workers in Lancashire could not decide where he should live permanently, the Local Government and Social Care Ombudsman has found.

The man was placed in short-stay accommodation by Lancashire County Council after his family told social workers they were struggling to cope with his behaviour and the impact it was having on his younger siblings.

The Ombudsman’s investigation found the placement in January 2016 was only meant to be temporary, but the man is still living in the accommodation today. It is likely the man’s behaviour has deteriorated through not living in suitable accommodation and not receiving appropriate support.

Local Government and Social Care Ombudsman, Michael King, said:

“This man has been left in limbo in this accommodation, which by its very nature was only ever intended to be a short stay. He has missed out on vital support and development opportunities

 

Source: Disabled man left for two years in unsuitable short-stay accommodation let down by council | Care Industry News

Ombudsman highlights the power of complaints to improve social care : Care Industry News


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The impact of an individual complaint in improving care services for others is being highlighted in a new report by the Local Government and Social Care Ombudsman.

The Ombudsman’s Review of Adult Social Care Complaints reveals councils and care providers implemented more than 1,300 recommendations to put things right for people in 2016/17.

As well as putting things right for an individual, the Ombudsman makes recommendations to improve services for others by changing policies and procedures, training staff, or recommending a service be provided.

Within the Ombudsman’s 1,318 recommendations, councils and care providers made nearly 180 procedural changes and committed to train staff on nearly 50 occasions.

In some cases the result of a single investigation leads to the Ombudsman looking at injustices caused to people who haven’t complained. Examples of this over the past year include one person’s complaint about the way a council charged for care leading to more than 60 people, who had been similarly affected, receiving refunds.

In another case a couple complained about their council’s blanket policy to reduce the level of care it provided, and nearly 70 other families had their care reviewed following the Ombudsman’s investigation.

Michael King, Local Government and Social Care Ombudsman, said:

“I want to highlight the power that one person speaking up can have in changing services for the better for everyone.

“Our recommendations not only put things right for individuals, but aim to help councils and care providers avoid the same problems affecting others. Where we think a fault was caused by a procedural or policy issue, we recommend ways to review and change those practices.”

The report also welcomes the increase in complaints the Ombudsman has received about independent care providers. This reflects the growing importance the sector is placing on making the complaints process more visible and informing people of their rights to come to the Ombudsman.

Mr King also encouraged those organisations – both public and independently owned – where complaints were taken on board, and analysed, at the most senior level.

He said:

“Strong leadership in the sector is essential to foster a true learning culture from complaints. Good leaders will empower their staff to respond quickly and with confidence to customer concerns, and ensure the learning from complaints is actively owned at a cabinet or board level.

“When things do go wrong, it is those organisations with such strong leadership which are best placed to gain from the outcome of our investigations.”

Professor Martin Green OBE, Chief Executive of Care England, said:

“In a sector being squeezed in all directions, it is heartening to see providers being praised for making the role of the Local Government and Social Care Ombudsman better known and take a lead in learning from complaints, particularly in addressing self-funder complaints.

“It is right and proper that the sector works with the Ombudsman to create a more robust system where there is more confidence in care providers.”

Andrea Sutcliffe, CQC’s Chief Inspector of Adult Social Care, said:

“This report from the Local Government and Social Care Ombudsman reinforces how important it is for people, their families and carers, to experience good, safe care that is responsive to their individual needs.

“CQC’s own State of Care report highlights the critical role strong leadership has in delivering high quality care and bringing about improvement. Being open to feedback, acting appropriately on people’s complaints and actively seeking out ways to put things right are essential elements of this.

“I encourage providers to use this report to reflect on how they listen and learn from people’s experiences, concerns and complaints. If all services did this then the quality of care would be better for everyone which is what we all want to see.”

 

Source : Ombudsman highlights the power of complaints to improve social care : Care Industry News

Stay well this winter as Public Health England urges people to get the flu jab | Care Industry News


People who are the most vulnerable to flu are being urged to get their free vaccination ahead of the winter period when the virus is most common.

Source: Stay well this winter as Public Health England urges people to get the flu jab | Care Industry News

Which? report shows shortfall in care home places by 2022 | Care Industry News


“These findings reinforce our warning about the urgent need to reform adult social care and deliver a long-term sustainable solution that delivers a range of

Source: Which? report shows shortfall in care home places by 2022 | Care Industry News

Will Green Paper on social care deliver much needed action for care sector? | Care Industry News


Unheeded warnings over the state of social care have left the care of our oldest and most vulnerable adults in danger, a providers’ group warned today.

Source: Will Green Paper on social care deliver much needed action for care sector? | Care Industry News

Leaked Brexit report on EU migration policy will create ‘a perfect storm’ for social care | Care Industry News


The ability of the homecare sector to recruit and retain sufficient care workers will be significantly challenged if proposals contained in a leaked Home Office

Source: Leaked Brexit report on EU migration policy will create ‘a perfect storm’ for social care | Care Industry News