Ageing population brings social care to breaking point | Care Industry News


Responding to Healthwatch England’s report into Social Care and carers, Cllr Ian Hudspeth, Chairman of the Local Government Association’s Community Wellbeing Board, said:

“With people living longer, increases in costs and decreases in funding, adult social care is at breaking point.

“Over recent years, councils have protected adult social care relative to other services. But the scale of the overall funding picture for local government means adult social care services still face a £3.5 billion funding gap by 2025, just to maintain existing standards. The likely consequences of this are more and more people being unable to get quality and reliable care and support, which enables them to live the lives they want to lead.

“Unpaid carers are the backbone of the care system, many of whom are unable to take a break, putting their own health on the line. Without these unsung heroes the system would collapse.

 

 

Source: Ageing population brings social care to breaking point | Care Industry News

Transparent and fair: what England can learn from Japan’s social care reform | Natasha Curry | Social Care Network | The Guardian


The long-awaited green paper on social care in England will finally be published this summer. But despite a royal commission, multiple independent reviews, and social care green and white papers over the last two decades, pledges to address problems in the system have become politically toxic and the issue has been repeatedly kicked into the long grass.

At the Nuffield Trust, we have been looking into Japan’s long-term care system to discover how the country managed to transition from a setup of highly variable and largely unaffordable care in the 1990s to a universal care system supporting nearly 6 million people. Although the context is different, Japan can teach us valuable lessons about implementing change with widespread public support.

 

Source: Transparent and fair: what England can learn from Japan’s social care reform | Natasha Curry | Social Care Network | The Guardian

Developments in Adult Social Care Bulletin: December 2017


Welcome to the December 2017 Developments in Adult Social Care Bulletin. This bulletin contains brief details of news, research reports, guidance, journal articles and government policy relating to adult social care.

 

Source: Developments in Adult Social Care Bulletin: December 2017

We can’t fix social care if we think it’s just for older people : The Guardian


Disabled people aged 18-64 make up a third of all social care users, yet they are not getting the support they need

Young man with crutches sitting on hospital chairs

For too long, discussions on social care have overlooked those who need care and support earlier in life. Photograph: Peter Dazeley/Getty Images

There’s no doubt that one of the biggest challenges facing Britain is how we deal with our ageing population. The countless warnings about the crisis in social care leave no room for doubt. Over the last seven years, budgets have decreased by more than £6bn (pdf) in real terms, and more than 1.2 million older people are struggling to get by without proper care.

The government’s promise to consult on social care in England provides an opportunity to bring about change. But for too long, this debate has almost exclusively focused on older people, overlooking those who need care and support much earlier in life.

More than 280,000 working age disabled adults rely on social care to lead independent, healthy lives. When done right, it empowers them not just to live, but to have a life.

At the MS Society, our new report, End the Care Crisis: Stories from people affected by MS in Englanddemonstrates the transformative impact social care can have for people with multiple sclerosis (MS). From Edith, whose support enables her to get to work each morning, to Martyn who, with the support of a carer, is able to do things others might take for granted, like go to the cinema.

It also highlights the devastating consequences when people aren’t able to get adequate support. Take Angela, for example. At just 35 with two young children, her husband (and carer) is at breaking point. And yet the first time she contacted the council for support, she was told help was only given to people in wheelchairs.

The system continues to fail us, and that is totally unacceptable.

Disabled people aged 18-64 make up a third of long-term social care users, accounting for almost half of the social care budget. We already know that younger people with MS are less likely to get proper support – only 32% of 18- to 29-year-olds with MS have all their care needs met, compared with 73% of those aged 70 to 79. But this isn’t the only thing illustrating the age divide.

Perhaps one of the most worrying symptoms of our failing social care system is the number of younger adults living in care homes for older people. A Freedom of Information request by the MS Society revealed more than 3,300 adults under 65 are in this situation in England. This indicates that, across the country, almost one in seven younger disabled adults in residential care could be in homes with mostly older people, and potentially missing out on the specialist care they need.

Not only are care homes for older people rarely equipped to meet all the needs of younger adults, living in such settings can be extremely isolating, and have a damaging impact on their quality of life and mental health. This is just one example of a much broader, deep-seated problem.

As a country, we do not provide younger adults with conditions such as MS the care we know they need. The question of how we fund and deliver quality social care has been a subject of debate in this country for at least 20 years. We’ve seen 10 government consultations and reviews of social care in that time, yet our politicians have failed to make the difficult decisions on the back of these.

Social care remains in crisis and there will be a £2.5bn funding gap by the end of the decade. While it’s promising that the government last month finally acknowledged the need to improve social care for younger as well as older people, we must hold it to account on this.

There is increasing evidence that fixing the social care system makes sense – not just ethically and morally but financially too. Reform could help prevent and delay acute needs from developing, reduce pressure on the NHS, galvanise local economies and, most importantly, enable disabled people to live independent, dignified and productive lives.

This latest consultation has to involve disabled people of all ages, offering real action and a bold vision for the future. One that recognises the experiences of everyone who depends on social care, and finally gives us a system that works for all who need it.

Michelle Mitchell is chief executive of the MS Society

 

Source: We can’t fix social care if we think it’s just for older people : The Guardian

There cannot be a sustainable NHS without a sustainable adult social care system : Care Industry News


LGA RESPONDS TO NHS CHIEF EXECUTIVE SIMON STEVENS’ SPEECH

Responding to NHS Chief Executive Simon Stevens’ speech to the NHS Providers conference, Cllr Izzi Seccombe, Chairman of the Local Government Association’s Community Wellbeing Board, said:

There cannot be a sustainable NHS without a sustainable adult social care system.

“Adult social care services provide invaluable care and support for older and disabled people.

“Investing in social care keeps people out of hospital and living independent, dignified lives at home and in the community. It is the single best investment to alleviate pressure on our vital NHS services.

“Social care services face an annual funding gap of £2.3 billion by 2020. Councils have long-argued that it is a false economy to pump money into the NHS whilst leaving social care chronically underfunded.

“While local government will have managed reductions to its core funding from central government totalling £16 billion between 2010 and 2020, we estimate that NHS spending will have increased by just under £20 billion over the same period.

“As a nation we urgently need to recognise the importance of adult social care and prevention of poor health. We need to shift perceptions and make adult social care just as important in the public eye and within government as the NHS.

“The Government should use this month’s Autumn Budget to set out how it plans to tackle the crisis in adult social care as well as the NHS to deliver a long-term sustainable solution that works for adults of all ages.

“We are also calling on the Government to reverse the planned cuts to councils’ public health budgets and renew its commitment to prevention as a fundamental priority of its health policy.”

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...Source : There cannot be a sustainable NHS without a sustainable adult social care system : Care Industry News

Tory conference: Care minister hides from fringe as funding crisis deepens | DisabledGo News and Blog


The Conservative minister for care services turned down at least four invitations to speak about adult social care at her party’s annual conference, while disabled people and other experts warned those meetings about the funding crisis facing the system. Jackie Doyle-Price refused to attend at least four social care fringe meetings at the conference in Manchester, Disability News Service has established. Health secretary Jeremy Hunt also ignored the issue of social care in his conference speech. Those who spoke at the fringe meetings Doyle-Price snubbed lined up to warn of the crisis facing the social care system, with one Tory MP warning that it “simply isn’t good enough” and that many people were “not getting the care they need”. In August, the UK government was told it was “going backwards” on independent living by the UN committee on the rights of persons with disabilities. Last week, Barbara Keeley, shadow minister for social care and mental health, told Labour’s annual conference

Source: Tory conference: Care minister hides from fringe as funding crisis deepens | DisabledGo News and Blog

The NHS and care homes could work better together to deliver high quality, cost-effective healthcare | Care Industry News


Healthcare provision to residents in care homes across England is often ‘erratic and inequitable’, a major three-year study led by the University of Her

Source: The NHS and care homes could work better together to deliver high quality, cost-effective healthcare | Care Industry News