A&E medics tell Hancock: No evidence yet for replacing four-hour target | News | Health Service Journal


The Royal College of Emergency Medicine has contradicted Matt Hancock’s suggestion that the four-hour target should be replaced, saying there was no evidence yet of a viable replacement.

Source: A&E medics tell Hancock: No evidence yet for replacing four-hour target | News | Health Service Journal

A&E consultant to British journalists: “Please start reporting the truth about the NHS”


Pride's Purge

Posted on Facebook:

Dear Journalists,

As an A&E consultant I am writing to ask for your help.

Up and down the country our A&E departments are in meltdown, our staff are at breaking point and we need your help.

Patients are being left in corridors because there are no ward beds for them to go to, staff are leaving shifts demoralised and exhausted and most importantly our patients are not getting the care they deserve.

We need the public to know about this, not to scaremonger, but for the truth to be out there – as the only way to get politicans to change – is by voters knowing the reality and prioritising the NHS at the ballot box.

But without the public understanding what is going on, we will continue to have this crisis year after year after year. This is where we need your help. We need…

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NHS chiefs could axe 24 A&E wards as part of huge shake-up | Daily Mail Online


Changes to seven English hospitals have been confirmed – and another 17 are in the balance. A&E units are set to be replaced in east London, West Bromwich and Birmingham.

Source: NHS chiefs could axe 24 A&E wards as part of huge shake-up | Daily Mail Online

More than 10 avoidable deaths a day linked to A&E overcrowding : Express.


Problems can occur in any organisations and situations and if they are not attended to outcomes will be affected. In some instances the problems will create blockages in processes thereby, more than likely, the outcomes will related to shortages. In others the problems could produce outcomes relating to over supply.

In manufacturing and industry these outcomes could be dealt with by changing production systems, reallocating employees, increasing or decreasing production and even stop production over a period. All these can be considered as the products being produced are inanimate objects. But when the outcomes, as in health and social care are relative to human life other methods need to be considered and implemented.

More money being available is one such consideration and for a time this may solve the problem, but if the root cause or causes are not being identified, then the problems will continue to reappear and more often with a greater intensity.

The problems could be not having the right staff in the right place at the right time, system deficiencies, lack of effective management or supervision or the wrong type. In time all of the these problems can be overcome, but the biggest problem is identifying the problem or problems in the first place. In this does the system even allow for this identification to take place and if it does do those in power or control of the system consider the findings and or act accordingly.

For in health and social care much of what is brought to bear on both health and social care is governed by political motives.

Funding for both is mainly in the hands of who is in power at any particular time and what is their own political outcomes, which may or may not be beneficial to health, social care and those in receipt of the services.

All that being said there are some savings or changes which could be found, however, these will most likely not be sufficient to solve the problems.

What should solve the problems is that all persons, organisations and political masters to work together to formulate a common aim that everyone could take ownership of, in other words ‘co-production’.

Unfortunately, those in power do not care for co-production as the resultant aim is owned by the co-production team and not those with the purse strings.

GPs urged to commit to seven day service or lose funding | DisabledGo News and Blog


GPs in England must keep their surgeries open for longer to meet demand from patients, or risk losing funding, Downing Street has warned. Number 10 said many patients were going to already pressurised A&E departments because they cannot get appointments. The government wants to see surgeries open between 08:00 and 20:00, seven days a week, unless they can prove the demand is not there. The British Medical Association accused ministers of “scapegoating” doctors. Downing Street issued a statement saying surgeries should do more to ensure they offer appointments in the evening and at weekends. It said: “Most GPs do a fantastic job, and have their patients’ interests firmly at heart. “However, it is increasingly clear that a large number of surgeries are not providing the access that patients need – and that patients are suffering as a result because they are then forced to go to A&E to seek care. “It’s also bad for hospitals, who then face additional pressure on their services.”

Source: GPs urged to commit to seven day service or lose funding | DisabledGo News and Blog

Only four hospitals in England hit A&E targets as staff claim exceptional pressures have become ‘the norm’ | Health News | Lifestyle | The Independent


Only four hospitals in England hit Government A&E targets in the first three months of 2016, new figures reveal, as frontline NHS staff warned that growing demand and squeezed spending have led to pressures on hospitals that were once considered exceptional becoming “the norm”.

Source: Only four hospitals in England hit A&E targets as staff claim exceptional pressures have become ‘the norm’ | Health News | Lifestyle | The Independent