Age UK statistics are alarming and shame the country | Care Industry News


New Age UK analysis finds that in the last 12 months, about 700,000 requests for formal care and support, equivalent to 51% of all applications, have been made by older people and yet have resulted in them not receiving formal care services. This is equivalent to 2,000 claims from older people being unsuccessful each day, or 80 every hour.[1]

In some of these cases, the older person was found by their council not to meet the eligibility criteria set for the social care system, and that was the end of it (23% of all requests for help); while in others the older person was found ineligible, but their council then referred them onto other services in the hope that they could assist, including their local Age UK (46% of all requests for help). [1]

 

Source: Age UK statistics are alarming and shame the country | Care Industry News

Over 75’s could be forced to cut back on food and heating to watch TV : Welfare Weekly


More than two million older people living in Britain could be forced to cut back on the food they eat or shut off their heating to continue watching television, a leading UK charity has warned.

New research carried out for Age UK has found that 40% of people aged 75+ in the UK won’t be able to afford the licence fee, or will have to cut back on everyday essentials including food and heating, to pay for a TV license if concessions are scrapped.

Reforms to BBC funding mean free TV licenses for over-75’s will no longer be funded by the UK Government, but will be left to the discretion of the public broadcaster from 2020.

 

Source: Over 75’s could be forced to cut back on food and heating to watch TV : Welfare Weekly

Tories challenged over ‘outrageous’ pension credit cut : Welfare Weekly


The SNP has tabled a motion forcing the UK government to give MPs a vote on the cut to Pension Credit, which would see the lowest income pensioners lose up to £7,000 per year.

The provision was made in the Welfare Reform Act back in 2012, but now the UK Government has given their intention to implement this clause without a debate – seven years and two governments later.

Pension Credit is a benefit designed to top up income for pensioners who have a weekly income below a certain amount.

This change would mean that for couples where one person is of state pension age and the other is below, the individual in receipt of state pension would no longer be eligible to claim Pension Credit to top up their household income.

 

Source: Tories challenged over ‘outrageous’ pension credit cut : Welfare Weekly

UK in no position to do without willing EU care workers – What does Brexit means for the care sector? | Care Industry News


The already fragile social care workforce will receive a further body blow under any Brexit scenario and older people in the South could be especially badly hit, the charity Age UK warns. But it is not too late to change this: Age UK is asking the Government to put measures in place now to allow EU nationals to continue to come to the UK to work as paid care staff, whatever happens with ‘Brexit’.

With around 110,000 job vacancies in care in England, more than 3 in 10 staff leaving each year, and 104,000 care jobs (1) and rising held by EU nationals, the Charity is calling on the Government to take action so that older people and their families can still be confident of getting the care they rely on in future.

Age UK is arguing that care workers should not be covered by the new rule recommended by the Government’s Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) that ‘low skilled EU workers’ should no longer have preferential access to the UK labour market after a UK withdrawal from the EU. The Charity says that care workers are low paid, not low skilled. In addition, the Charity fears that care is in no fit state to withstand the systemic shock that such a move would represent. EU nationals who work in social care are concentrated in particular areas of the country, with the highest proportion in London where 1 in 7(2) are from the EU and significant numbers also to be found in the South West and South East, the Home Counties, Midlands and Manchester.

 

Source: UK in no position to do without willing EU care workers – What does Brexit means for the care sector? | Care Industry News

Care needs will continue to increase and deepen the crisis in adult social care | Care Industry News


Responding to a report by Age UK on a rise in unmet care needs and the costs to the NHS of delayed discharges due to a lack of social care, Cllr Izzi Seccombe, Chairman of the Local Government Association’s Community Wellbeing Board, said:

“People’s unmet care needs will continue to increase and deepen the crisis in adult social care unless the sector receives a long-term fundingsettlement, like the NHS, and further funding is made available for council’s public health and prevention services.

“To prevent crises in the NHS, government needs to plug the £3.5 billion funding gap facing adult social care by 2025 and reverse the £600 million in reductions to councils’ public health grants between 2015/16 and 2019/20.

 

Source: Care needs will continue to increase and deepen the crisis in adult social care | Care Industry News

New analysis reveals that 1 in 3 people living with dementia don’t get the NHS support they are supposed to : Age UK


With the number of people living with dementia estimated to hit 1 million by 2020, Age UK is warning of an urgent and growing need to provide much better support for those who have been told they have the condition.

Despite the fact that regularly reviewed care plans should be available for everyone living with dementia, new analysis from Age UK shows that over 1 in 3 people with dementia don’t have one. The Plans are important because they are the gateway to follow up support from the NHS, and they should also help ensure that other support a person may be receiving, such as social care, is properly joined up with NHS help for their dementia.

Age UK analysed data from 7,185 GP practices in England and found that, in total, 458,461 people had a recorded diagnosis of dementia in November 2017, but only 282,573 had a new care plan or at least one care plan review on record in the last year.

Yet NHS England’s Guidance says “there is an urgent need to ensure every person who has dementia has an individual care plan” and goes on to specify that these reviews should take place once every 12 months at the minimum. The plans are supposed to set out the tailored support someone should receive, and are meant to be reviewed regularly with a health professional as a person’s condition progresses and changes. Care plans are equally important for family members who are often providing significant amounts of

 

Source: New analysis reveals that 1 in 3 people living with dementia don’t get the NHS support they are supposed to : Age UK

Report

New figures from Age UK show our social care system is disintegrating | Care Industry News


New figures from Age UK reveal the shocking extent to which millions of older people are being left to prop up the country’s disintegrating care system, with those aged 65 and over providing nearly 54 million hours of unpaid care each week in England in 2016[i].

These figures highlight the rising demands being placed on older informal carers as Government underfunding causes the social care safety net to shrink, resulting in increasing numbers of our older population in need of care, being thrown back on their own and their family’s resources.

In 2015/16, over two and a quarter million (2,299,200) people aged 65 and over provided care – a 16.6 per cent increase on five years ago when 1,829,200 did so[ii],[iii].

Over 400,000 (404,400) of these unpaid carers are from the oldest demographic in our society (aged 80 and over), and they provided 12.7 million hours of care in 2015/16 – a 12.7 per cent increase from 2009/10[iv],[v].

Most older people willingly take on the task of helping to care for a loved one – usually but not always a husband or wife – and don’t think of themselves as doing anything out of the ordinary. However, leaving older people to shoulder too much, or sometimes all of the responsibility and hard work of looking after someone in declining health and with significant care needs is unfair. It can also put these older family carers’ own health at risk, and many of them are coping with health problems themselves.

Over half (54.8 per cent) of people aged 65 and over who provide at least one hour of care have a long-standing illness or disability – equating to well over a million people (1,262,500), or one in ten (10.7%) of all these family carers

 

Source: New figures from Age UK show our social care system is disintegrating | Care Industry News

Nearly 1 in 3 elderly people struggling with essential tasks of living, amidst breakdown in social care | Care Industry News


Age UK calls on all political parties to put social care at the heart of their manifestos as new figures reveal high numbers of over-80s going without the help

Source: Nearly 1 in 3 elderly people struggling with essential tasks of living, amidst breakdown in social care | Care Industry News

English social care system for elderly facing ‘complete collapse’ | DisabledGo News and Blog


Age UK report calls for urgent action, including cash injection in spring budget and development of long-term plan Social care in England is at risk of imminent collapse in the worst affected areas unless urgent steps are taken to address the crisis engulfing the sector, Age UK has warned. The charity’s latest report on the healthcare of older people calls for a cash injection into the adult social care system in the spring budget and the development of a long-term solution to a problem that will otherwise become more acute. Analysis previously published by Age UK suggests almost 1.2 million people aged 65 and over do not receive the care and support they need with essential daily activities such as eating, dressing and bathing. That figure has shot up by 17.9% in just a year and almost by 50% since 2010, with nearly one in eight now living with some level of unmet need, it says. Age UK’s charity director, Caroline Abrahams, said the report makes for “frightening reading”, adding:

Source: English social care system for elderly facing ‘complete collapse’ | DisabledGo News and Blog