Archives for posts with tag: ASD

In the first study of its kind, scientists show that bilingual children with autism spectrum disorders can switch mental gears more easily than those who can only speak one language.

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a growing concern in the United States, affecting an estimated 1 in 68 children.

Despite the prevalence and years of research, there are still several unanswered questions about how and why ASD develops, and how best to manage it. Researchers are looking at these queries from all angles.

A new study gains fresh insight by approaching

 

Source: Children with autism may benefit from being bilingual : Medical News Today

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This is a question I get fairly often in relation to all the various autism related tags on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.  – “Why is the autistic community so upset?”

Because almost all of the media representation of autism comes from people who aren’t even autistic. Autistics ARE speaking. Are YOU listening?

 

Source: Autistic Outrage – Why is the Autistic Community so upset? : Neurodivergent Rebel


Early signs of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can be detected in infants, yet many children with autism do not receive a diagnosis until the ages of two or three. While not every autistic baby is able to be diagnosed as an infant, there are many benefits to receiving a diagnosis before reaching preschool age. According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC) an autism diagnosis can be appropriately given at the age of 18 months or even sooner for some babies. Doctors will typically do a screening for autism spectrum disorders at the 9 month, 18 month, 2-year, and 3-year wellness checkups. The earlier an infant is diagnosed with autism, the sooner interventions can begin and the best resources can be identified.

Many children with autism, however, do not receive an official diagnosis until they reach the age of two or three years old, usually after the child has already begun preschool and social interactions have become more obviously strained. It is never too late to be diagnosed and begin identifying resources to help make life with autism easier. The earlier a child is diagnosed (especially in his/her formative years of development) the sooner the child can begin to benefit from selected

 

Source: Signs of Autism in Infants and Children – Autism Parenting Magazine


to aspie or not to aspie

Was it autism in the dendritic spines, bipolar in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, ADHD in the cerebellum or borderline in the amygdala?

It sounds a little like a game of Cluedo, right? Because that’s how it feels trawling across the depths of the internet into the wee hours and trying to work out what makes me different.

Poirot had the Orient Express and I have this.

I have a wall covered in neon post-it notes scribbled with symptoms and experiences – thin white string connecting these into a pattern to try and find the culprit. I have page after page of symptoms, more than 10,000 words of notes – just another sign of my unusual overzealousness.

When it comes to ASD, I’m not pretending to be an expert – I don’t even have psychology at GCSE. In fact, it’s entirely possible that once I make it through the NHS diagnosis…

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Source: 8-year-old autistic girl creates amazing portraits


A new study demonstrates the potential of wearable technology as a social-skills aid for children with autism spectrum disorder.

Source: Google Glass app helps autistic children with social interactions: A prototype Google Glass app can recognize conversational prompts and provide the user with suitable responses in return — ScienceDaily


I was fortunate enough to join a contingent with The Arc of North Carolina and attend the 2017 Disability Policy Seminar in Washington, DC in March.  It was an incredible learning experience, as I came to better understand the inner workings of our political system and the impact our legislators have on the government benefit […]

Source: Securing the Future for Your Child with Special Needs – Autism Parenting Magazine


Mitochondria, the tiny structures inside our cells that generate energy, may play a key role in autism spectrum disorders (ASD).

Source: Altered mitochondria associated with increased autism risk


Many children with autism spectrum disorder experience significant gastrointestinal issues, but the cause of these symptoms is unknown. Professionals in the medical community have suggested a potential link between diet and gastrointestinal issues related to autism. Now, researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine have found that diet is not a contributing factor in these individuals. The researchers hope the findings could help lead to improved treatment options.

“Unfortunately, it’s not uncommon for those with autism to experience constipationirritable bowel syndrome, abdominal pain and other gastrointestinal issues,” said Brad Ferguson, Ph.D., postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Radiology at the MU School of Medicine and the MU Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders. “We sought to find out whether nutritional intake in their individual diets was associated with gastrointestinal issues. Based on our findings, dietary intake does not appear to be the culprit for these issues, and other factors are likely at play.”

A previous study conducted by the research team identified a relationship between increased cortisol response to stress and gastrointestinal symptoms in people with autism spectrum disorder. Cortisol is a hormone released by the body in times of stress, and one of its functions is to prevent the release of substances in the body that cause inflammation. In this study, the researchers sought to confirm or rule out dietary intake as a source of gastrointestinal problems.

The team studied 75 individuals between the ages of 5 and 18 who are part of the Autism Speaks Autism Treatment Network who were treated at the MU Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders. The individuals’ caregivers completed a questionnaire to

 

Source: Study: Diet not connected to GI problems in children with autism


Women and girls with autism may face greater challenges with real world planning, organization and other daily living skills, according to a new study.

Source: Females with autism show greater difficulty with day-to-day tasks than male counterparts: Largest study to date of executive function in females with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) reveals unique challenges in diagnosis and intervention — ScienceDaily

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