Archives for posts with tag: ASD

Many children with autism spectrum disorder experience significant gastrointestinal issues, but the cause of these symptoms is unknown. Professionals in the medical community have suggested a potential link between diet and gastrointestinal issues related to autism. Now, researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine have found that diet is not a contributing factor in these individuals. The researchers hope the findings could help lead to improved treatment options.

“Unfortunately, it’s not uncommon for those with autism to experience constipationirritable bowel syndrome, abdominal pain and other gastrointestinal issues,” said Brad Ferguson, Ph.D., postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Radiology at the MU School of Medicine and the MU Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders. “We sought to find out whether nutritional intake in their individual diets was associated with gastrointestinal issues. Based on our findings, dietary intake does not appear to be the culprit for these issues, and other factors are likely at play.”

A previous study conducted by the research team identified a relationship between increased cortisol response to stress and gastrointestinal symptoms in people with autism spectrum disorder. Cortisol is a hormone released by the body in times of stress, and one of its functions is to prevent the release of substances in the body that cause inflammation. In this study, the researchers sought to confirm or rule out dietary intake as a source of gastrointestinal problems.

The team studied 75 individuals between the ages of 5 and 18 who are part of the Autism Speaks Autism Treatment Network who were treated at the MU Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders. The individuals’ caregivers completed a questionnaire to

 

Source: Study: Diet not connected to GI problems in children with autism


Women and girls with autism may face greater challenges with real world planning, organization and other daily living skills, according to a new study.

Source: Females with autism show greater difficulty with day-to-day tasks than male counterparts: Largest study to date of executive function in females with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) reveals unique challenges in diagnosis and intervention — ScienceDaily


We are often quick to make judgements on what we perceive to be happening when children behave in a way that draws attention – but when a young person with autism is struggling to cope with the world, the last thing they need is our criticism.

These 10 tips reflect our combined experience of research and close engagement with children with autism. And as a proud parent of a boy with autism, I would like everyone to think more about how they respond to children.

Because if we take time to respect and understand people with autism our communities will become more enriching and inclusive for everyone.

1. See me for who I am

Source: The things every child with autism wishes you knew


A new study looking at injury mortality in people with autism finds that accidental deaths are common and that swimming lessons could save lives.

Source: Swimming lessons may be life-saver for children with autism – Medical News Today


New method uses biochemistry to accurately predict whether a child will develop autism spectrum disorder by measuring the products of metabolic processes.

Source: New biochemical method accurately diagnoses autism in children – Medical News Today


Autism is more common in males. Now, a new study finds it also linked to having a brain with certain anatomical features that are more common in males.

Source: Autism more common in people whose brains are anatomically more male-like – Medical News Today


People with autism have low levels of the protein nSR100. Now, by reducing this this protein in mice, scientists have triggered behaviors linked to autism.

Source: Could absence of one protein explain 1 in 3 cases of autism? – Medical News Today


Every year the Queen gives a speech on Christmas day and this year I thought why not join her. So pull up a chair, grab a cuppa or something a little stronger and spend the next 2 minutes giving some thought to my message.

Christmas is a time of wonder and joy. A time of year when families come together and share gifts but more importantly share their time and love.


Autism isn’t just for Christmas.

When you are using the naughty list as a bargaining tool to make your child behave.
Spare a thought for the child who is facing extreme anxiety because they feel that they haven’t been good enough.

Source: Diary of an imperfect mum: Autism isn’t just for Christmas


Autism spectrum disorders affect around one percent of the world’s population and are characterized by a range of difficulties in social interaction and communication. In a new study published in Cell, a team of researchers led by Gaia Novarino, Professor at IST Austria, has identified a new genetic cause of ASD. Gaia Novarino explains why this finding is significant: “There are many different genetic mutations causing autism, and they are all very rare. This heterogeneity makes it difficult to develop effective treatments. Our analysis not only revealed a new autism-linked gene, but also identified the mechanism by which its mutation causes autism. Excitingly, mutations in other genes share the same autism-causing mechanism, indicating that we may have underscored a subgroup of ASDs.”

“The identification of novel genes, especially in heterogeneous diseases such as autism, is difficult. However, as result of a collaborative effort, we were able to identify mutations in a gene called SLC7A5 in several patients born to consanguineous marriages and diagnosed with syndromic autism”, points out Dr. Caglayan, Chairman of the Department of Medical Genetics in the School of Medicine at Istanbul Bilim University in Turkey and co-author of the study.

Source: New form of autism found – Medical News Today


Sensory problems are common to autism spectrum disorders. Some individuals with autism may injure themselves repetitively – for example, pulling their hair or banging their heads – because they’re less sensitive to pain than other people.

New research points to a potential mechanism underlying pain insensitivity in autism. The study, conducted by two teams at Duke University and appearing online in the journal Neuron, is the first to connect autism to one of the most well-studied pain molecules, called TRPV1 (transient receptor potential ion channel subtype V1), which is a receptor for the main spicy component of chili peppers.

“Not enough research has been done on the mechanisms driving sensory problems in autism, but it’s important because sensory processing probably affects to some degree how the brain develops,” said co-author Yong-hui Jiang, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor of pediatrics and neurobiology at Duke. Jiang collaborated with Ru-Rong Ji, Ph.D., professor of anesthesiology and neurobiology and chief of pain research in Duke University School of Medicine’s Department of Anesthesiology.

Source: Autism-linked protein crucial for feeling pain – Medical News Today

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