Lost Vice Guy WINS Britain’s Got Talent 2018


Well done to Lost Voice Guy and wish him well when he performs at the Royal Variety Performance later this year.

I also say well done to the runner up Robert White.

Same Difference

Same Difference is thrilled to report that one of our editor’s favourite DisAbled comedians, Lost Voice Guy (Lee Ridley) has just won Britain’s Got Talent 2018.

This us the moment we have been wishing for for the last two months, ever since we heard he was on the show. But, he’s not a singer, and everyone knows singers usually win BGT- unless dancers are lucky- so we didn’t dare to hope it might actually happen!!

Yet happen it has. Here’s his winning routine:

And here’s his winner’s speech- with a joke thrown in, of course:

Same Difference wouldn’t be Same Difference unless we also gave a shout out and sincere well done to the runner up, Robert White, who has Asperger’s. Here is his final routine:

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Autistic Outrage – Why is the Autistic Community so upset? : Neurodivergent Rebel


This is a question I get fairly often in relation to all the various autism related tags on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.  – “Why is the autistic community so upset?”

Because almost all of the media representation of autism comes from people who aren’t even autistic. Autistics ARE speaking. Are YOU listening?

 

Source: Autistic Outrage – Why is the Autistic Community so upset? : Neurodivergent Rebel

The unusual suspects


to aspie or not to aspie

Was it autism in the dendritic spines, bipolar in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, ADHD in the cerebellum or borderline in the amygdala?

It sounds a little like a game of Cluedo, right? Because that’s how it feels trawling across the depths of the internet into the wee hours and trying to work out what makes me different.

Poirot had the Orient Express and I have this.

I have a wall covered in neon post-it notes scribbled with symptoms and experiences – thin white string connecting these into a pattern to try and find the culprit. I have page after page of symptoms, more than 10,000 words of notes – just another sign of my unusual overzealousness.

When it comes to ASD, I’m not pretending to be an expert – I don’t even have psychology at GCSE. In fact, it’s entirely possible that once I make it through the NHS diagnosis…

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AN AUTISTIC CHILD GOT ARRESTED!


Grady P Brown - Author

I saw on the news that a 10 year old autistic boy was arrested for kicking his teacher. As an autism ambassador, I am completely appalled by how the so-called police handled the situation. I was in that kid’s situation when I was his age. Back then I had little to no control over my emotions and impulses and there have been people who were cruel to me as a result. Rather than accommodate the child to calm him down they outright arrest him like a common criminal. I am officially losing all faith in our society. We have become brutal and sadistic to the point in which we traumatize autistic children over petty little things. I hope this video finally motivates the people to do something to change the way schools and the police handle situations like this.

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My Aspergers Child: Helping Kids on the Autism Spectrum to “Fit-In” with Their Peer Group


Young people with High-Functioning Autism (HFA) and Asperger’s (AS) usually want to fit-in and have relationships with friends and classmates, but they just don’t know how to do so effectively. They lack an understanding of conventional social rules and often “appear” to lack empathy. In order to improve socialization, these “special needs” kids need to learn and focus on socialization from an “intellectual” standpoint. Things that come naturally for children without autism need concentration by those with it.
The ability to navigate everyday social interactions presents significant challenges for kids on the autism spectrum. Social situations that present difficulties can range from the fairly simple (e.g., engaging in a conversation with a peer) to the extremely complex (e.g., determining whether a peer who seems friendly is actually harmful in some way).
Examples of important social skills to be taught to HFA and AS children include (but are not limited to):

 

 

Source: My Aspergers Child: Helping Kids on the Autism Spectrum to “Fit-In” with Their Peer Group

One girl and her cat’s mission to raise awareness of autism | Care Industry News


After being diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome three years ago, Kylie Turner quickly became aware of the huge stigma that came with it. Having been denied c

Source: One girl and her cat’s mission to raise awareness of autism | Care Industry News

My Aspergers Child: Raising a Child on the Autism Spectrum: The Impact on the Family


A diagnosis of Asperger’s (AS) or High-Functioning (HFA) not only changes the life of the youngster diagnosed, but also that of parents and siblings. Many moms and dads of an AS or HFA youngster must deal with a significant amount of stress related to expensive therapies and treatments, therapy schedules, home treatments, managing job responsibilities, and juggling family commitments.

While some children on the spectrum and their families cope well with the additional challenges that autism brings, for many others, the impact can be overwhelming.  Children with AS and HFA face many issues (e.g., the persistent challenge of trying to “fit-in” with their peer group, frustration at not being able to express how they feel, daily anxiety because they can’t make sense of what is happening around them, etc.). As a result, these kids often develop stress-reducing behaviors that can make them appear odd and/or defiant. Some moms and dads even avoid taking their “special needs” youngster out to public places rather than face the reactions from those who don’t understand the disorder. This may cause not only the autistic youngster, but the entire family to become housebound.

 

Source: My Aspergers Child: Raising a Child on the Autism Spectrum: The Impact on the Family

Autism: When I am Watched


You live your life for you and everyone should respect your choice, please do not feel inadequate and ashamed, for you are not.

I myself eat all my meals with a table spoon, not because I can not use a knife and fork, but because I wish to. If people do not like this, then that is their problem not mine.

In my youth I was always uncomfortable in most social company as I did not have confidence in myself. However, with the passage of age I am much more confident in my expressions and actions.

So I say, believe in yourself and you would be surprised what you can do, if you so wish to do. If you can not do a task or not wish to, unless it is due to your employment, then do not, for it is not your problem, but the problem with others who are not showing you respect and understanding.

Have a good life.

autismalifetimeundiagnosed

“Didn’t your parents teach you to cut your meat?” they asked as I sat in front of them with a fork and knife in my hands.  I don’t remember, I thought.  Maybe not.  All I knew was that the knife felt awkward in my hands, squeaked across the plate, and wasn’t cutting very well.

fireplace me

They must have taught me, though.  I was eighteen and living with my boyfriend’s parents.  A Hungarian/German family that loved cooking, and loved food.  Being a picky eater with extreme sensitivities to taste, texture, and type of food, plus a strong difficulty eating in front of other people (they always ate together at the table) made it very difficult for me to show them I appreciated what they were doing for me.

After all, I was very much starving before they allowed me to move in with them.  But there were foods I couldn’t…

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