Archives for posts with tag: Aspergers

Grady P Brown - Author

I saw on the news that a 10 year old autistic boy was arrested for kicking his teacher. As an autism ambassador, I am completely appalled by how the so-called police handled the situation. I was in that kid’s situation when I was his age. Back then I had little to no control over my emotions and impulses and there have been people who were cruel to me as a result. Rather than accommodate the child to calm him down they outright arrest him like a common criminal. I am officially losing all faith in our society. We have become brutal and sadistic to the point in which we traumatize autistic children over petty little things. I hope this video finally motivates the people to do something to change the way schools and the police handle situations like this.

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Young people with High-Functioning Autism (HFA) and Asperger’s (AS) usually want to fit-in and have relationships with friends and classmates, but they just don’t know how to do so effectively. They lack an understanding of conventional social rules and often “appear” to lack empathy. In order to improve socialization, these “special needs” kids need to learn and focus on socialization from an “intellectual” standpoint. Things that come naturally for children without autism need concentration by those with it.
The ability to navigate everyday social interactions presents significant challenges for kids on the autism spectrum. Social situations that present difficulties can range from the fairly simple (e.g., engaging in a conversation with a peer) to the extremely complex (e.g., determining whether a peer who seems friendly is actually harmful in some way).
Examples of important social skills to be taught to HFA and AS children include (but are not limited to):

 

 

Source: My Aspergers Child: Helping Kids on the Autism Spectrum to “Fit-In” with Their Peer Group


After being diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome three years ago, Kylie Turner quickly became aware of the huge stigma that came with it. Having been denied c

Source: One girl and her cat’s mission to raise awareness of autism | Care Industry News


A diagnosis of Asperger’s (AS) or High-Functioning (HFA) not only changes the life of the youngster diagnosed, but also that of parents and siblings. Many moms and dads of an AS or HFA youngster must deal with a significant amount of stress related to expensive therapies and treatments, therapy schedules, home treatments, managing job responsibilities, and juggling family commitments.

While some children on the spectrum and their families cope well with the additional challenges that autism brings, for many others, the impact can be overwhelming.  Children with AS and HFA face many issues (e.g., the persistent challenge of trying to “fit-in” with their peer group, frustration at not being able to express how they feel, daily anxiety because they can’t make sense of what is happening around them, etc.). As a result, these kids often develop stress-reducing behaviors that can make them appear odd and/or defiant. Some moms and dads even avoid taking their “special needs” youngster out to public places rather than face the reactions from those who don’t understand the disorder. This may cause not only the autistic youngster, but the entire family to become housebound.

 

Source: My Aspergers Child: Raising a Child on the Autism Spectrum: The Impact on the Family


There should more acceptance of others, for then the world would be a better place.

WindSweptChildOnAShootingStar

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I was reading the wonderful post  Autistic Confessions – Stimming at Work — Anonymously Autistic  ( I have posted it a little before this.)

It brought to mind things for me that I thought I would share.

Firstly, I should explain to you what stimming is. The word ” stimming ” is short for self-stimulatory behaviour and stimming can be  flapping, rocking, spinning, squeezing, biting, chewing, picking, pacing,shaking legs and so much more. Stimming is used to manage anxiety, stress, anger, to help deal with overwhelming situations, or just for comfort.

I grew up not knowing I was Autistic, when I used to rock, as rocking from side to side is my way of stimming, I was told  ” don’t rock !” When I asked why ?  I was told that,  ” crazy people rock and you don’t want people to think you are crazy !” – whilst I can…

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You live your life for you and everyone should respect your choice, please do not feel inadequate and ashamed, for you are not.

I myself eat all my meals with a table spoon, not because I can not use a knife and fork, but because I wish to. If people do not like this, then that is their problem not mine.

In my youth I was always uncomfortable in most social company as I did not have confidence in myself. However, with the passage of age I am much more confident in my expressions and actions.

So I say, believe in yourself and you would be surprised what you can do, if you so wish to do. If you can not do a task or not wish to, unless it is due to your employment, then do not, for it is not your problem, but the problem with others who are not showing you respect and understanding.

Have a good life.

autismalifetimeundiagnosed

“Didn’t your parents teach you to cut your meat?” they asked as I sat in front of them with a fork and knife in my hands.  I don’t remember, I thought.  Maybe not.  All I knew was that the knife felt awkward in my hands, squeaked across the plate, and wasn’t cutting very well.

fireplace me

They must have taught me, though.  I was eighteen and living with my boyfriend’s parents.  A Hungarian/German family that loved cooking, and loved food.  Being a picky eater with extreme sensitivities to taste, texture, and type of food, plus a strong difficulty eating in front of other people (they always ate together at the table) made it very difficult for me to show them I appreciated what they were doing for me.

After all, I was very much starving before they allowed me to move in with them.  But there were foods I couldn’t…

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Caring and life.

The Autistic Mermaid

What does normal look like?

For me, it changes all the time. Life stuff happens and you have to deal with it. Not always easy when you’re autistic and unexpected change can send you into a shutdown.

Luckily, most of the changes in my life recently have been ones that I can control or at least plan a little bit for.

This time last year I was working full time, my daughter was in breakfast club, then school, then after school club. I’d just learnt to drive so we were taking advantage of having a shiny new car to go adventuring in. I was on a decent (to me) salary of £22k a year, plus child benefit and tax credits, some of which were specifically towards the cost of childcare (which is really bloody expensive).

And now? Now I’m unemployed. I don’t have to pay for childcare. Petrol is expensive…

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Source: My Aspergers Child: Is a Formal “Diagnosis” of Asperger’s Helpful or Harmful?


autismalifetimeundiagnosed

Whenever he went out of town – often for camping, visiting or something – even if just for a day, my father would bring us small gifts back to “let us know he was thinking of us.” On Christmas Eve, he would travel out to every open store (as our mother read us books, such as, “Twas the Night Before Christmas”) and buy us last minute gifts for Christmas. As if they hadn’t bought us enough already.

When we traveled with him, he would buy us treats along the way. It was what he did.

My father was a gift giving person.

He also spent a lot of time with us – walking, driving, singing, going camping, visiting amusement parks or playgrounds… When my father wasn’t working or sleeping (he was a shift worker) he was usually doing something with us.

But the gifts… that was his thing.

And had…

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It is good to share and will be of comfort to others. It is yours to do as you feel and any posting will be helpful to all as proof we are not alone.

autismalifetimeundiagnosed

Perhaps I shouldn’t be writing as often as I do. It has become a compulsion to me – something I must do, even when I don’t want to. I suppose it is a decent exercise – to write every day – that I will learn, and become better at it. At least that is my hope, and the encouragement which I have heard. But then, is it always appropriate that my writing be published?

For I do write every day. I would write every day, even if I didn’t publish it to my blog. I write in my journal. I write letters to myself. I write down plans and inspirations. I do write every day.

I also know that while I like some of what I publish to my blog, there are those days… the ones when I am so anxious, or so distracted, that my thoughts don’t flow properly…

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