Government’s social care funding failure ‘is terrible news for disabled people’ | DisabledGo News and Blog


Disabled campaigners have reacted with alarm to the government’s decision that it will not address the social care funding crisis until the end of next year, despite announcing billions of pounds a year extra for the NHS.

Despite saying in a speech that ministers “know we need to improve social care”, prime minister Theresa May said a new funding settlement for social care would not be announced until the next spending review, expected at the end of 2019.

The health and social care secretary, Jeremy Hunt, also told MPs that the government’s green paper on older people’s social care – which had been expected next month – would now be delayed until the autumn so it could be published at “around the same time” as a new 10-year plan for the NHS.

Hunt had earlier told the BBC that the government would also produce “a long-term plan for social care” but that ministers “can’t do all these things at the same time”.

The Department for Health and Social Care (DHSC) had not been able by 1pm today (Thursday) to explain whether its parallel piece of work on working-age disabled adults and social care had also been delayed until the autumn.

A DHSC spokeswoman had refused to comment when asked why the social care funding crisis was not being addressed at the same time as NHS funding.

May and Hunt announced an average real terms increase in NHS funding of 3.4 per cent a year from 2019-20 to 2023-24, which will see NHS England’s budget increase by £20.5 billion in real terms by 2023-24.

Although the government will not say how the NHS increase will be funded until the chancellor delivers his budget at the end of this year, the increase in funding was broadly welcomed.

But there was frustration among disabled commentators and campaigners that – yet again – ministers had failed to address the need for a major increase in social care funding.

 

Source: Government’s social care funding failure ‘is terrible news for disabled people’ | DisabledGo News and Blog

Theresa May to warn social care must wait until 2020 for extra funds, despite pledging £20bn for NHS | The Independent


Theresa May will anger social care leaders by warning they will have to wait for desperately needed extra money, despite her promise of a £20bn a year bailout for the NHS.

There will be no large cash injection to tackle the care crisis until the “forthcoming spending review”, the prime minister will say – which is not due to kick in until 2020.

Extra money for public health will also be allocated only when all departments are told their spending resources for years beyond 2020, she will confirm in a speech in London on Monday.

 

Source: Theresa May to warn social care must wait until 2020 for extra funds, despite pledging £20bn for NHS | The Independent

Warning that tens of thousands will go without much needed care and support in 2018 | Care Industry News


Social care could pass the point of no return in 2018 unless the Government orders emergency action to support the sector ahead of any reforms arising from its promised green paper.

Directors of adult social services are warning that tens of thousands more older and disabled people will go without the support they need next year – and many working adults will have to give up jobs to help care for their parents – if urgent steps are not taken to back the sector with special interim funding and a new national strategy to recruit and retain care workers and nurses for nursing homes.

So many organisations that provide care are quitting the sector because of low returns and severe recruitmentproblems that directors fear the damage will become irreversible in 2018.

Margaret Willcox, President of the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services (ADASS), said: “We eagerly await the green paper on support of older people and the extensive reforms that are needed to place social care on a sustainable long-term footing. But we must have action in the short term to ensure that the system can survive.

“The crisis facing us is so acute that we fear social care could pass the point of no return in 2018 while we wait for decisions to be made.”

 

Source: Warning that tens of thousands will go without much needed care and support in 2018 | Care Industry News

Adult social care needs long term funding, starting now says ADASS : Care Industry News


Measures to address the long-term reform of adult social care need to be brought forward to tackle the significant financial, workforce and quality pressures facing the sector, the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services (ADASS) is urging.

 

With more than half (53%) of councils expecting to overspend their adult social care budgets this year by up to nearly £21 million each, quality challenges increasing as a result of council savings, and vacancy rates for home care staff rising, there is a fear that the sustainability of adult social care could breach its tipping point.

 

Despite a £2 billion injection for social care over three years, which is going to reduce delayed transfers of care from hospitals, and the publication of a Green Paper next summer, ADASS remains concerned that this does not address a continuing funding gap, increased support for people living longer with more complex needs and the costs of the welcome National Living Wage.

 

The challenges – which threaten the ability of councils to fulfil their statutory duty under the Care Act – are impacting now on older and disabled people and their families, as well as care markets, care workers and the NHS.

 

ADASS is particularly concerned that financial pressures for the increasing care needs of working age adults – those with learning or physical disabilities or mental health problems – now exceed those of older people.

 

With ring-fenced investment money topping a list of concerns of Directors, ADASS has made its submission to the Autumn Budget, in which it is calling on Government to:

 

·         Build on the additional £2 billion for the period to 2019/20 by taking further steps to secure extra recurring funding to address continuing service pressures and secure the stability of the care market

 

·         Bring forward at the earliest opportunity clear and wide-ranging options for consultation about putting the social care system on a more secure and sustainable long-term footing beyond 2020. This should aim to secure the right balance between the protection of private assets from catastrophic care costs and adequate public funding for those who have never been able to acquire such assets

 

·         Help to address the urgent workforce pressures in the sector by: affording care staff, social workers and social care nurses the same recognition as other professionals, like doctors, nurses and teachers; enhancing the status of care workers and addressing pay issues and training; and developing a national recruitment campaign and addressing the uncertainty for non-UK EU citizens who are a crucial part of our workforce.

Recognising the importance of adult social care in achieving long-term transformation of the wider health and care systems in order to promote independence and reduce the need for long-term care; and ensuring the full engagement of councils in sustainability and transformation partnerships and in the emergence of accountable care systems.

Margaret Willcox, President of ADASS, said:

“There is a growing depth of shared concerns about the quality, safety and sufficiency of adult social care services from across the sector. This is impacting on thousands of older and disabled people and their families now.

“The extra £1 billion for adult social care this year barely covers the £824 million in savings that Directors will have made this year and cannot hide the fact that by the end of this financial year, £6 billion has been cut from councils’ adult social care budgets since 2010 – with need for our services growing all that time.

“With a continuing funding gap this year and beyond, increased overspending in council budgets, care providers closing or returning contracts, rising need, extra costs due to the National Living Wage and continuing difficulties in recruiting and retaining staff, the social care system remains in a perilously fragile state.

“Not only is there evidence that the future care needs of older people will be greater than previous estimates, with far more care home places required over the coming years, but greater cost pressures are now coming from the needs of working age adults.

“Dedicated and hard-working care workers are providing good, personal care despite increasing pressures, but only 4 per cent of Directors are fully confident in their ability to fulfil their statutory duties under the Care Act this year.

“Adult social care needs to be a national priority and future-proofed for current and future generations who will be needing care in increasing numbers and for a longer time during their lives.

“Whilst we are pleased that Government has committed to publishing the long-awaited Green Paper on social care next summer, more needs to be done now to secure extra recurring money to address funding gaps, address continuing service pressures and the stability of the care market.

“Proposals for the long-term reform of adult social care should be brought forward and need to address the needs of the whole population – not just older people.

“It is also vital that future funding settlement for the NHS and adult social care take account of the inter-dependency of these services and encourage collaboration rather than cost shunting.

“The need for a cross-party consensus on establishing a fair and transparent solution to adult social care is growing – and ADASS looks forward to contributing to debates on this.”

 

Source : Adult social care needs long term funding, starting now says ADASS : Care Industry News

Social care and local authorities face a ‘perfect storm’ in funding | Care Industry News


More than half of councils expect to overspend their adult social care budgets this year by up to nearly £21 million each, while all local authorities face having to help pay a potential adult social care bill of nearly £270 million to fund six years of back-pay for sleep-in shifts, according to a new survey published today by the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services (ADASS).

 

The poll shows that sleep-in pay costs are the second biggest concern – after ring-fenced investment money – for directors of adult social services directors in England as they approach winter pressures facing the sector.

 

The survey found that the average cost – for councils, providers and self-funders, per council area – to pay for six years of backpay for sleep-in shifts is £1.78 million. If this figure was applied to the 151 councils in England providing adult social care the total would amount to £269 million.

 

The potential bill comes as more than half (53%) of Directors forecast an overspend on adult social care budgets this financial year. The average estimated overspend is £2 million, with the highest at £20.8 million.

Source: Social care and local authorities face a ‘perfect storm’ in funding | Care Industry News

Majority of MPs think social care system is not fit for purpose-Independent Age survey | Care Industry News


Responding to an Independent Age survey showing the majority of MPs think the social care system is not fit for purpose, Cllr Izzi Seccombe, Chairman of the Local Government Association’s Community Wellbeing Board,said:

“It is encouraging to see so many MPs across all political parties recognising the need for action to find a sustainable solution to the adult social care funding crisis.

“The extra £2 billion for social care over the next few years is a step in the right direction, but it is only one-off funding which reduces each year. Vital services caring for elderly and disabled people still face an annual £2.3 billion funding gap by 2020, which will continue to grow.

“It is absolutely critical that the Government brings forward its Green Paper on the future of social care and works with local government leaders to address the issue of long-term funding and also create the conditions necessary to ensure the development of the right kind of care and support services.

“We strongly support a cross-party consensus on adult social care and councils are firmly committed to making this happen.

“With councils facing further funding pressures and growing demand for support by the end of the decade and beyond, this is the best way to ensure we will find a solution that ensures our future generations enjoy a care system which doesn’t just help them out of bed and gets them washed

 

Source: Majority of MPs think social care system is not fit for purpose-Independent Age survey | Care Industry News

The NHS and social care must stop bickering over funding | Niall Dickson | Social Care Network | The Guardian


With both parts of the system under pressure, blaming each other will do nothing to help those who rely on services

Source: The NHS and social care must stop bickering over funding | Niall Dickson | Social Care Network | The Guardian

Vulnerable told to expect cuts to council care | DisabledGo News and Blog


The elderly and disabled in England are being told to expect cuts to care services and rises in charges after council chiefs unveiled spending plans. The Association of Directors of Adult Social Services said £20.8bn was expected to be spent on care this year, a cash rise of 5% since last year. It follows a £1bn cash injection announced in the Budget which ministers said would relieve the pressures. But ADASS said £824m of savings were still having to be made. The group, which represents social care directors, said rising demand meant cuts were inevitable given the current funding levels. The warning comes after ADASS surveyed 151 council care chiefs about their plans for 2017-18. The polling suggested councils would spend £14.2bn of their own money, rising to £20.8bn when the £1bn cash injection – money from the NHS for care projects and the fees users are asked to contribute – are taken into account. How savings will be made ADASS said care chiefs could make some of the savings

Source: Vulnerable told to expect cuts to council care | DisabledGo News and Blog

More cuts and difficult decisions for adult social care | Care Industry News


Despite welcome extra funding and councils protecting and planning to spend more on adult social care budgets, difficult decisions and more cuts need to be made in the service, according to a survey of 151 adult social services directors in England.

Research published today by the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services (read here)reveals that the proportion of council spending on adult social care is set to increase by 1.3 per cent – from 35.6 per cent in 2016/17 to 36.9 per cent this year. However, councils still have to make 8 per cent cuts in overall budgets for a second year in succession due to increasing costs and demand.

Directors plan to make further savings of £824 million in 2017/18, taking cumulative savings in adult social care since 2010 to £6.3 billion. But with a reported overspend of £366 million against 2016/17 budgets, Directors are finding it increasingly hard to implement planned cuts in practice.

Despite a welcome £2 billion in extra funding being made available to help alleviate adult social care pressures, only 31 per cent of responders are fully confident that planned savings for 2017/18 will be met, falling to 7 per cent in 2019/20.

Margaret Willcox, President of ADASS, said:

Source: More cuts and difficult decisions for adult social care | Care Industry News

Extra social care funding from Government is not reaching the front line | Care Industry News


Providers understand the pressure that local authorities and CCGs are under, but as ADASS’ Budget Survey demonstrates, continued provider attrition threatens t

Source: Extra social care funding from Government is not reaching the front line | Care Industry News