Family Facing Deportation From Australia Because Of Son’s CP


I agree with you.

This is disgraceful that residency can be judged on the disability of a child and the related cost to Australia.

Yes, this is how it is in Australia today.

This is blatant disability discrimination, which I  would not have thought possible in such a progressive country as Australia. For this means it does not matter, what people have been doing in Australia, working there and producing wealth, not just for themselves, but also Australia, for when they have children and if they dared to have a child with disabilities, this could affect the decision whether they could stay in Australia. It shows that these parents have not been really valued by Australia, perhaps these parents should be able to claim from Australia a cost related to their time in Australia and the benefit Australia has had from them.

This is not what should be expected from, a so called, civilised country, as Australia, appears, to take what they want and then discard, when they feel there will be additional costs to Australia.

For this is totally disgraceful and Australia should be ashamed of themselves. This is a form of abuse, disability abuse.

Same Difference

I can’t describe how sad and angry I am after reading this. I have Cerebral Palsy and am a British Asian. I have grown up in the UK. I can’t imagine anything like this happening here. The fact that this child was actually born in Australia just makes the situation 1000 times worse in my eyes.

Australia’s disability discrimination commissioner has called on the immigration minister, Alex Hawke, to intervene “in a humane way” in a case in which a family is facing deportation because their six-year-old son has a disability.

On Tuesday night Ben Gauntlett was quizzed at Senate estimates about the plight of Australian-born Kayaan Katyal, and his parents, Varun and Priyanka, who are facing deportation after being rejected for permanent residency last month.

The ABC, which revealed the case on Sunday, reported that the family had been told in a rejection letter that Kayaan would cost…

View original post 459 more words

Ryan Shorthouse and Anvar Sarygulov: We need more migrants to become citizens | Conservative Home


Doing so would improve social integration, enhance the contribution that migrants make, and allay public discontent over immigration.

Source: Ryan Shorthouse and Anvar Sarygulov: We need more migrants to become citizens | Conservative Home

Two gay Saudi journalists ‘treated like criminals’ in Australia after seeking asylum | Australia news | The Guardian


Exclusive: Men who fled own country after threats to out them have been detained in Australia

Source: Two gay Saudi journalists ‘treated like criminals’ in Australia after seeking asylum | Australia news | The Guardian

How many Muslim women actually wear the burka in the UK? It’s probably less than a few thousand – The i – Weekend Reads #55


Given the reaction of some parts of the media, one could be forgiven for assuming that Europe and the rest of the Western world has become besieged by burqa-clad women. The “fear” is now so rife that empty bus seats in Norway were mistaken for a group of women wearing the burqa.

Meanwhile, in a much derided stunt in Australia, far right leader Pauline Hanson wore a full-face covering burqa into the senate chamber. Hanson’s aim was to prohibit Muslim women from covering their faces and to get the burqa banned in the country.

To look at it, the burqa is simply a veil which covers the body and face – and yet it is also sometimes associated with oppression, terrorism, and extreme religious beliefs. Some burqas only have a mesh screen for the wearer to see through. The niqab, on the other hand, is a face veil worn with a headscarf which leaves the eyes uncovered, while the hijab is a scarf which covers the head and neck. In Europe, the term “burqa” is used to refer to women who wear robes to cover the body and face, but their eyes may be left uncovered, as seen in the main image of this article.

Source: How many Muslim women actually wear the burka in the UK? It’s probably less than a few thousand – The i – Weekend Reads #55

May’s new Brexit plan. There is an alternative – from within the Government itself. | Conservative Home


The Cabinet was reportedly presented with a Treasury assessment of the impact of four outcomes to the Brexit talks: no deal, a Canadian-type deal, the EEA…and the Government’s own new scheme.  This itself should give pause for thought to the suggestion that, other than the EEA and no deal, there is no alternative to the plan agreed at Chequers.  It is a statement of the obvious that there will be as many of the last as there are people willing to propose them.

Far more to the point, however, there was one from within the Government itself – a proposal for it to seek “Canada Plus Plus Plus”, as David Davis once referred to it.  It is well known that DexEU was working on a draft of the White Paper that would outline this idea during the run-up to the Chequers meeting.  We are told that it went through some nine iterations.  The last ones were largely cuts for length.  None of them have been made public.  Until now.

Today, ConservativeHome publishes key extracts from a full draft of this White Paper.  They are not from one of the briefer final versions, but they set before our readers the main pillars of DexEU’s approach, which we are told were unchanged in any of those nine drafts.  As we write, we don’t have the advantage of also having seen the Government’s own White Paper, apparently to be published later, and thus the capacity to make comparisons between its text and that we publish today.

However, there will clearly be substantial overlap between the two – but, on the basis of the Government document published in the aftermath of Chequers, some key differences too.  A central one is the proposed regulatory treatment of manufactured goods.  In her Mansion House speech earlier this year, the Prime Minister referred in this context to “a comprehensive system of mutual recognition”.  She also set out in her Florence speech last year a three-basket approach to regulation.

“There will be areas which do affect our economic relations where we and our European friends may have different goals; or where we share the same goals but want to achieve them through different means.  And there will be areas where we want to achieve the same goals in the same ways, because it makes sense for our economies,” she said.  This was the approach agreed at the Chequers mee

 

Source: May’s new Brexit plan. There is an alternative – from within the Government itself. | Conservative Home

Don’t Let Memories Die


Memories are our own history and is important to ourselves and our family to record as much as we can.

I do wish I had done this, especially with regards to my own parents, for they are no longer with us and these memories are now lost for ever.

Author -Carole Parkes

As an avid family historian, I’m a great believer in memoirs and autobiographies. If your aged family members are capable, encourage them to give you a written piece on  their life experiences. If that would be too difficult, encourage them to talk about their lives — the times they laughed until their sides ached, or when sadness overtook them, in fact, to tell you about everything, including what they remember about great uncle Fred.

I know, it’s not always easy in our busy lives to find time to sit and talk but, just remember, those frail relatives will probably not be around when you finally do have the time to spend with them. I’ve lost count of the times I’ve heard those researching their family trees say they wished they’d asked the questions. Please don’t be one of them. We often only develop an interest in our roots as we…

View original post 289 more words