Archives for posts with tag: Autism Spectrum

It is great when we all hear stories such as these, especially in the current climate of many areas of negativity.

In general the Learning Disability community may not be a vast as some other forms of disability, although there are vast numbers of persons with LD with its many related conditions and each person may be different in many ways, but the numbers of related condition and their effects are may be more vast than other disability areas.

LD is an unknown for many within the UK and its press and Government perception is not generally good, thus progressing the negativity relating to LD to the public at large. But this negativity is certainly very misplaced and this negativity needs to be urgently reversed.

While the LD community is very progressive more collective activity needs to be generated and not only between the large national charities, as there are many local independent small and relatively large charities and a vast arrange of support groups, which in the very austere financial climate are not receiving sufficient funding and in many vases no funding at all.

Now is the time for all to come together and in doing so all other related medically based charities to provide wherever possible a joint solid front to the authorities especially on a local level and with these local authorities to central government, which will eventually achieve more for us all and enhance the lives of our loved ones.

Scope's Blog

Chris is taking part in RideLondon for Scope next weekend. When his son, Oliver, was born with an undiagnosed condition, Chris didn’t know who to turn to for support.

We had never thought about disability seriously until Oliver was born. Oliver has an undiagnosed genetic condition which has certain physical manifestations. He was born with fused fingers and he has a cleft palate. He has some other conditions and a severe learning disability but it’s quite hard to describe. If your child has Cerebral Palsy or something that has a name, then you know where to go because there are people who will support you for that.

Oliver, a young child wearing glasses, smiles

We’ve also found out that Oliver is very strongly on the autistic spectrum as well. This came as quite a surprise to us because he has a very good sense of humour. He is very naughty but not in a bad way. He…

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Young people with High-Functioning Autism (HFA) and Asperger’s (AS) usually want to fit-in and have relationships with friends and classmates, but they just don’t know how to do so effectively. They lack an understanding of conventional social rules and often “appear” to lack empathy. In order to improve socialization, these “special needs” kids need to learn and focus on socialization from an “intellectual” standpoint. Things that come naturally for children without autism need concentration by those with it.
The ability to navigate everyday social interactions presents significant challenges for kids on the autism spectrum. Social situations that present difficulties can range from the fairly simple (e.g., engaging in a conversation with a peer) to the extremely complex (e.g., determining whether a peer who seems friendly is actually harmful in some way).
Examples of important social skills to be taught to HFA and AS children include (but are not limited to):

 

 

Source: My Aspergers Child: Helping Kids on the Autism Spectrum to “Fit-In” with Their Peer Group


“My 10 year-old child with high-functioning autism is very smart, but he is very, very poorly coordinated. He has difficulty riding his bike, bowling, catching, hitting a tennis ball, kicking, shooting a basketball, diving in a pool, swinging a bat, and throwing. He can’t run fast without tripping, and he has terrible posture. As an infant, he was a later walker (almost 17 months). He was a very sloppy eater, and still has trouble cutting with a knife or the edge of his fork. Also, he had some speech articulation issues. We were hoping he would grow out of all this, but he hasn’t. I wonder if there is anything we could do to help him be less awkward. Does what I’ve described sound “normal” for some children with autism? Or does it sound concerning? How physically uncoordinated should he be before we try to get professional help for him?”

Many children with High-Functioning Autism (HFA) and Asperger’s (AS) have a comorbid condition called Hypotonia, which is sometimes referred to as “floppiness.” This is because the muscles are meant to help support the skeletal system and are designed to prevent certain kinds of motion. Because the muscles are not especially tight, children with Hypotonia frequently experience “hypermobility” (i.e., the ability to move limbs into awkward positions). They often find that they’re able to very easily carry out feats that require flexibility, but not strength or balance (e.g., splits, back-bending, shoulder rotation, etc.). Also, they may display uncommon flexibility in other joints (e.g., fingers).

 

Source: My Aspergers Child: Hypotonia in Kids on the Autism Spectrum


A diagnosis of Asperger’s (AS) or High-Functioning (HFA) not only changes the life of the youngster diagnosed, but also that of parents and siblings. Many moms and dads of an AS or HFA youngster must deal with a significant amount of stress related to expensive therapies and treatments, therapy schedules, home treatments, managing job responsibilities, and juggling family commitments.

While some children on the spectrum and their families cope well with the additional challenges that autism brings, for many others, the impact can be overwhelming.  Children with AS and HFA face many issues (e.g., the persistent challenge of trying to “fit-in” with their peer group, frustration at not being able to express how they feel, daily anxiety because they can’t make sense of what is happening around them, etc.). As a result, these kids often develop stress-reducing behaviors that can make them appear odd and/or defiant. Some moms and dads even avoid taking their “special needs” youngster out to public places rather than face the reactions from those who don’t understand the disorder. This may cause not only the autistic youngster, but the entire family to become housebound.

 

Source: My Aspergers Child: Raising a Child on the Autism Spectrum: The Impact on the Family


Source: My Aspergers Child: Is a Formal “Diagnosis” of Asperger’s Helpful or Harmful?


Children with autism have a wide range of ability to talk with other people, but it has been difficult to group children by their specific skills.

Source: Colours of autism spectrum described by CanChild researchers – Medical News Today


Source: UI researchers find benefits to using telehealth with ASD families – Medical News Today


Source: My Aspergers Child: Explaining the “Hidden Curriculum” to Children on the Autism Spectrum


Source: Cohen Children’s Medical Center study: Children on autism spectrum more likely to wander, disappear – Medical News Today


Many people ask HOW to change their child’s behavior. But SHOULD you?

Source: Should You Change Your Kid’s Behavior? – Dr. Psych Mom

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