Katie Price: Harvey And Me


Anybody’s son or daughter moving on in life is a stressful and worrying situation, but even more so in respect of persons with autism and some other conditions. This is because parents and the children have spent years getting to know each other and now in a moment in time great change is occurring. Even when all is going smoothly, there is always going to be that deep down worry, what can happen next, have we covered everything and any others that may occur.

But life as to go on and nothing will ever be fully covered.

But with autism will the new surroundings and people within have sufficient knowledge to manage all that can occur and the answer is most likely not, all that everyone can do is the best available.

Same Difference

When faced with having to move their disabled child to a different school or college, families face difficult decisions. Now, reality TV star and ex-model, Katie Price, is on that journey with her eldest son, Harvey, who is about to make that transition.

It was a quiet 18th birthday for Harvey. There were balloons in the garden and presents were opened, including a frog lunchbox and an iPad. For a treat, Katie took him to one of his favourite places – the local train station.

“This is the best train ever. I love it,” Harvey says, taking photographs.

His birthday marks another milestone. It is time to leave school and find a college, a process the family has filmed for BBC One documentary, Katie Price: Harvey and Me.

“It’s pretty predictable to know what will happen with the other kids,” Katie says, who has four other children. “But with…

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Autism: ‘They Said Bleach Would Cure My Daughter’


What a difficult situation to be in for you would expect support from your family and/or your community regarding autism and the professionals to help you by sorting the misinformation from friends and community.

For autism is something that is not generally known about, well I did not. That was, until someone came to my place of employment to give a talk an autism.

I should explain, I was working at a day service for adults with learning disabilities and in this talk everything that was said I could see my own daughter and it gave me a great insight in explaining her behaviours and how to deal with them.

Eventually, after some lengthy deliberations with myself, that I decided that I wished to get a formal diagnosis. It was then I talked to my wife and eventually she agreed and then to discuss this with the appropriate authorities, who also eventually agreed and we then went on the waiting list.

Eventually the authorities advised that the they would commence the diagnosis process and the lengthy diagnosis process started and after some time an autism diagnosis was given.

This showed me how complex autism is in every way.

People are wary of the unknown and some can’t cope with it, so they put in place rituals and diversions so they can.

This could be why the BAME community put in place the reasonings they do.

But the professionals should be more aware of all the various situations and put in place facilities to help all concerned. But they do not and leave people to their ignorance and misconceptions and this makes life difficult for others who wish to understand more about autism.

Same Difference

“I’ve had people offer me products to ‘kill the autism’ – bleach, salts, supplements.”

For Yvonne Odukwe, a Nigerian living in Newport, community stigma around her daughter’s autism is a barrier – but it’s only half of a “double whammy”.

She and others say black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) people can also face poor engagement from authorities.

The Welsh Government said its national autism team “regularly engages with BAME communities” among other steps.

“It’s a double layer,” said Yvonne, mother of 19-year-old Jasmine.

“I’m fighting the mainstream and then I’m also fighting my community because they’re not accepting me and, in many cases, blaming and shaming me.”

Autism is a lifelong development disability which affects how people see, hear and interact with the world.

Yvonne, a mother-of-three, said that like many parents of autistic children, she’d had to fight to get Jasmine support, but many parents from backgrounds like…

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When can children get the COVID-19 vaccine? 5 questions parents are asking


This article looks at the vaccines for children and it appears that work has already been started or is soon to start, but there is still, at least, one other area and this is for adults with learning disabilities (Intellectual Disabilities) and Autism who are needle averse, for in this area needle injections are not possible.

The adults are very vulnerable, but as I see it there is no work taking place in that direction.

With regards to Flu these adults can be given the nasal spray, which is generally given to children under 12 years, but it is not as effective as the injection, but something is better than nothing.

 

Source: When can children get the COVID-19 vaccine? 5 questions parents are asking

The Crown’s Learning Disability Storyline Highlights Painful Lack Of Progress


This is indeed very worrying and in this day and age you would or should expect that it does not occur, but it does.

A few years ago Care and Treatment Reviews (CTRs) were introduced in England by NHS England, and I did start the training to be one of the ‘Experts by Experience’, but, I had to withdraw as I came to the conclusion that I did not have sufficient spare time capacity to do effectively, the work required.

I am, however, aware of some persons who went through the training and became ‘Experts by Experience’. When asked to do reviews these can be anywhere within England and may require the need to have overnight stays if the review is some distance away from where the ‘Expert by Experience’ resides.

In theory these reviews are a very welcoming practice and hope in practice that they hold up to be.

When persons with Learning Disabilities and/or Autism are committed into one of these Special Hospitals, it should have been for a short period of time, but in practice, before the ‘CTRs’ were introduced, but in practice his was not so. As once in it was extremely difficult, if not bordering on the impossible to be discharged, so I do hope the CTRs are effectively being used to minimise this practice.

Perhaps Experts by Experience, if they are willing to do so, could comment.

Same Difference

There are 1.5 million learning disabled people in the UK, but they are rarely seen or heard from. Little is spoken of this demographic of people, who in many cases completely rely on others in order to live.

Unless you’re a family carer or professionally involved, you may not know or have regular contact with any learning disabled people.

However, in episode 7 of the latest season of The Crown, viewers learn more about the royal family and learning disabled people. Peter Morgan, creator of the series, writes about two learning disabled women, Nerissa and Katherine Bowes-Lyon.

In Morgan’s fictional depiction, Princess Margaret and the Queen discover that Katherine and Nerissa, their cousins on their mother’s side, are still alive, despite being listed as dead in Burke’s Peerage, and have spent their adult lives in an “institution for mental defectives”.

Despite being born into wealth and privilege, Nerissa and…

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Textbook Makes Autistic People ‘Sound Like Toddlers’


The UK education system is, in many respects, ‘not fit for purpose’, as it just gears children ready to gain examination results and obtain pieces of paper, which are only there to prove they can pass exams.

In no way does the UK education system get children ready for life outwith the education system.

Now it appears that some text books are also ‘not fit for purpose’ where will it all end.

For the mentioned text books are not only, ‘not fit for purpose’ but are exceedingly insulting to persons with Autism.

The education system is in dire need of being re-educated and without further delay.

Another aspect of life in the UK which is in dire need of change.

Same Difference

A publisher has said it will conduct an “immediate review” into an A Level textbook accused of being “deeply offensive to autistic people”.

Pearson’s A Level Psychology Revision Guide says children who have “tantrums” due to routine changes may be autistic.

The National Autistic Society called it “misleading” and has urged the publisher to correct the book.

It said: “A meltdown is not a tantrum. It is an intense response to an overwhelming situation.”

The revision guide, aimed at but not approved by the AQA exam board, says some autistic children “like to stick to the same routine, and little changes may trigger tantrums”.

But George, who is autistic and studying A level psychology says: “It makes us sound like toddlers.”

He says: “If that’s how they describe meltdowns what other inaccuracies are there going to be? Calling it ‘tantrum’ feels condescending.”

His concerns are echoed by Tom Purser, Head…

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The Celebration of the life of Zoe Angella Sterry


Celebration of the Life of Zoe Sterry

Zoe Angella Sterry

Zoe Angella Sterry was the wife of Chris Sterry, the originator of this Post, and he lost his wife in the early hours of the morning of Saturday 26 September 2020 and her funeral took place on Friday 16 October 2020.

Chris started seeing Zoe in August 1983 and they were married on 4 October 1988, so, in total they had 37 years together, in which 32 years they were married.

Chris did not have any children of his own, but looked after Zoe’s children, David, Katie and Rachel as his own, together with their 3 grandchildren Oliver, Frankie and Luke, not forgetting the latest addition Theo as a Great Grandchild. She also had a younger brother Calvin.

Zoe was a formidable lady, with a big heart and an enormous amount of love. She had a very strong personality and enormous strength of character and would express her opinions to anyone, especially to Sheffield City Council (SCC), whom she had to deal with on behalf of Katie, who had multiple physical disabilities, severe Learning Disabilities, through Cerebral Palsy and also Autism.

Together Zoe and Chris fought with SCC for Katie, which Chris will now do alone.

Zoe and Chris created a very strong partnership and Zoe will be sadly missed by, not only him, but all who came into contact with her.

There is a webcam of the funeral service and the details to access can be seen below and the link will be live for 7 days from the 16 October 2020

NameMrs Zoe Angella Sterry
LocationGrenoside Crematorium, Sheffield – South Chapel
Date & TimeFriday 16/10/2020 12:30
Event Number830579
RequesterLiz Cousins – Tomlinson & Windley

https://www.wesleymedia.co.uk/webcast-view
Login / Order ID: 50539
Password: kadcavmg

Please read through the attached step by step document before using the webcasting service to ensure your system is compatible.

Thanks,

Wesley Media Team

Zoe Angella Sterry

Step by Step document

Please see below the Order of Service

Order of Service

The body of Zoe is now no more, but the memories live on

So does the dealings with SCC for Katie.

At least it will keep Chris busy.

Thank you