As a black police officer, I know the Met is still institutionally racist | Metropolitan police | The Guardian


An environment of white privilege affects BAME officers and the communities we police, writes an anonymous Met police officer

Source: As a black police officer, I know the Met is still institutionally racist | Metropolitan police | The Guardian

Tories say £60k payment to bereaved families of health workers will NOT apply to care workers or cleaners – and families of immigrants may be deported – SKWAWKBOX


The UK government has said that the £60,000 bereavement payment to the families of health workers killed by the coronavirus will not apply to care workers or hospital cleaners.

The Tories have also said that families of the deceased have no automatic right to remain in the UK. Families of people who died trying to keeping us safe and well could face deportation if their right to remain is withdrawn.

Johnson and his fellow Tories will no doubt still make sure they are filmed ‘clapping for carers’ tomorrow.

Source: Tories say £60k payment to bereaved families of health workers will NOT apply to care workers or cleaners – and families of immigrants may be deported – SKWAWKBOX

‘Look at how white the academy is’: why BAME students aren’t doing PhDs | Education | The Guardian


When Usman Kayani chose to do a PhD in theoretical physics at King’s College London, he felt sure an academic career lay ahead of him. Now two months after completing his doctorate, having suffered from anxiety and depression, he is considering other options.

At first Kayani was the only student who was either black, Asian or from an ethnic minority (BAME) in his research group. Although the group later became a bit more diverse he remembers how that feeling of being different, coupled with a lack of BAME academics and professors he could look up to as role models, contributed to his feelings of anxiety.

“It didn’t help my imposter syndrome. I do feel the lack of representation can put people off a career in academia. It’s a vicious cycle,” he says. “My dream was always to stay in academia. Now I don’t know what I want to do and I feel a bit lost.”

As a BAME student, Kayani was defying the odds by doing doctoral research at all. According to an analysis by the Higher Education Funding Council for England in 2016, BAME students are more likely than white students to decide to take a master’s course but less likely to do a PhD. The research found that 2.4% of white students had started a PhD within five years of graduation, compared to 1.3% of their BAME peers.

Last month the UK Council for Graduate Education launched an in depth review looking to establish why more BAME graduates aren’t progressing onto PhDs. The review, which will report next year, will conduct a detailed analysis of student data to understand trends for researching, qualification rates and funding for different ethnicities, as well as to highlight existing schemes which are encouraging participation rates for BAME students.

The fact that more young black students aren’t choosing to do doctorates doesn’t surprise Lynette Goddard, a black academic at Royal Holloway, University of London. She says that in 21 years as an academic she has only supervised three black PhD students. “That tells you something,” she says. When she announced her promotion on her Facebook page, someone commented: “I was never taught by a black lecturer at university so it didn’t occur to me I could do that.”

 

Source: ‘Look at how white the academy is’: why BAME students aren’t doing PhDs | Education | The Guardian

Average pay has fallen for millions of lower and middle income workers since 2010, TUC research says – inews.co.uk


Average pay has effectively fallen for millions of lower and middle income earners over the past decade, research has found.

Austerity and a lack of bargaining rights had held down pay in many jobs, according to the Trades Union Congress (TUC).

Real pay for earners in jobs paying between £9.56 and £12.73 an hour has dropped by 1 per cent since 2010.

This compares with a seven per cent increase for this group between 2002 and 2010.

 

Source: Average pay has fallen for millions of lower and middle income workers since 2010, TUC research says – inews.co.uk

Excl: Enfield councillor who failed to pass panel now dep to leader who altered papers to let him stand | The SKWAWKBOX


A series of exclusives by the SKWAWKBOX revealed the ‘irregularities‘ in the selection process for local election candidates – overseen by then-local campaigns secretary Nesil Caliskan – that ultimately led to right-winger Ms Caliskan becoming leader of Enfield council in London.

The councillors who elected her included a significant number who had only become council candidates via the irregular process she ran.

The skewed selection process also led, shockingly, to the deselection of all the borough’s black councillors and triggered a series of protests and calls for investigation across the Labour political spectrum – including half the council’s Cabinet – and the resignation of all of Enfield Labour group’s female officers except Ms Caliskan, amid accusations of bullying, intimidation and physical threats.

The national party was forced to step in, effectively putting Enfield Labour group into special measures.

 

Source: Excl: Enfield councillor who failed to pass panel now dep to leader who altered papers to let him stand | The SKWAWKBOX

A decade of cuts has set back diversity in the public sector | Jane Dudman | Society | The Guardian


Ian Thomas is used to tough jobs. The former children’s services director at Rotherham council is now chief executive of Lewisham, a London borough facing huge financial pressure, including a £15.6m overspend on children’s services.

Only two areas of public service better reflect the UK population: social work and the NHS. Latest figures show that around one-fifth of social workers and NHS staff are from BAME backgrounds, although given that 42% of medics are not white, diversity in non-clinical NHS jobs is very much lower.

The lack of diversity is even more acute at senior levels. Judges, senior civil servants, chief constables and NHS chief executives are still predominantly white. In local government, according to last year’s Colour of Power report, none of the 108 chief executives of England’s largest councils was a BAME person.

 

Source: A decade of cuts has set back diversity in the public sector | Jane Dudman | Society | The Guardian

Just when you think things can’t get worse for Amber Rudd, the UN drops a bombshell on the Home Office | The Canary


Home secretary Amber Rudd is facing calls to resign over the Windrush scandal. From bungled statements about deportation targets to the suffering her department has caused, the crisis has gone from bad to worse.

And now there’s even worse news for Rudd and the Home Office. Because human rights experts from the UN have expressed concern over “structural racism” in the UK.

“Structural racism”

The experts were responding to data on the number of Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) people killed as a result of contact with “state security”. They stated:

The deaths reinforce the experiences of structural racism, over-policing and criminalisation of people of African descent and other minorities in the UK.

According to the press release from the UN:

Data disclosed by the Metropolitan Police in August 2017 found that people of African descent and of ethnic minority background, in particular young African and Caribbean men, subject to deadly use of force by restraint and restraint equipment, were twice as likely to die after the use of force by police officers and the subsequent lack or insufficiency of access to appropriate healthcare.

This is backed up by data from Inquest, a charity that supports families and investigates deaths in custody. According to its analysis of data across England and Wales from 1990 to 2018:

 

Source: Just when you think things can’t get worse for Amber Rudd, the UN drops a bombshell on the Home Office | The Canary

Health Behaviour Change among BAME community


Anil Gumber thought you might be interested in the following paper.  Please pass on as appropriate.  Thank you.

Anil writes:

“I hope you will find the following article (published in BMC Research Notes) useful in your activities addressing health behavioural change among ethnic minorities.

Improving prevention, monitoring and management of diabetes among ethnic minorities: contextualizing the six G’s approach

People from Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) groups are known to have an increased risk of developing diabetes and face greater barriers to accessing healthcare resources compared to their ‘white British’ counterparts. The extent of these barriers varies by demographics and different socioeconomic circumstances that people find themselves in. The purpose of this paper is to present and discuss a new framework to understand, disentangle and tackle these barriers so that improvements in the effectiveness of diabetes interventions for BAME communities can be achieved.

Full-text can be downloaded from: http://rdcu.be/Dx61

Anil Gumber

Principal Research Fellow, Sheffield Hallam University”