Insect apocalypse? Not so fast, at least in North America : The Conversation


Recent reports of dramatic declines in insect populations have sparked concern about an ‘insect apocalypse.’ But a new analysis of data from sites across North America suggests the case isn’t proven.

Source: Insect apocalypse? Not so fast, at least in North America : The Conversation

Bees are dying at an alarming rate. Amsterdam may have the answer. | Euronews


AMSTERDAM — An unkempt stretch of tall grass, wildflowers and weeds in front of a train station doesn’t look like much — but it may be crucial to solving one of the world’s biggest environmental puzzles.

While scientists around the globe have been sounding alarm bells over the decline of bees and pollinators crucial to the growth of crops, the diversity of wild bee and honeybee species in the Dutch capital has increased by 45 percent since 2000.

The city of 2.3 million people attributes the success to creating bee-friendly environments like the overgrown, sunburnt patch of shrubs that commuters pass by daily.

The installation of “insect hotels” and a ban on the use of chemical pesticides on public land also appear to have played a role.

“Insects are very important because they’re the start of the food chain,” said Geert Timmermans, one of eight ecologists working for the city. “When it goes well with the insects, it also goes well with the birds and mammals.”

 

Source: Bees are dying at an alarming rate. Amsterdam may have the answer. | Euronews