Monica Crowley – Why the Swamp Hates Donald Trump




Monica has a right to her opinion and here she eloquently expresses it, she is a true believer.

She is quite correct that the swamp needs to be removed, but is Donald Trump the person to do this, for I believe he his also part of the Swamp.

He may be removing parts of the swamp, but only to replace it with other parts of the swamp.

Within the this YOUTube video she expresses that Donald Trump is imperfect and that he is making mistakes, as we all do.

The problem with Trump is that when he makes mistakes he does not accept that he is making mistakes and therefore is not aware that he should be learning from them.

Making mistakes is something we all do, but the message to learn is that by making mistakes you learn from them and this then mitigates  making these or similar mistakes again and you become a stronger, better person in doing so.

To always assume you are always correct is a fatal flaw as no one is 100% correct, 100% of the time, but Donald Trump truly believes that he is.

You either like or do not like Trump and I am one of the latter. Some of his principles are not in agreement with mine, especially his racist views and his inability to understand the concept of mistakes, in reference to himself, are a major contributory factor.

Whether he is or will be good for America is still to be seen, however, the bigger picture needs to be considered and this is in respect of The World.

I feel in World affairs that individualism is now not a major factor, although this is still a consideration, but now in most aspects there is globalism as whatever is done in one area as consequences for other areas. the two need to be working in conjunction with each other.

In fact with his America First he is acting within the aspects of individualism, the continual interference of America in international areas is not individualism but globalism. Even Trump promised in his campaign to not have American action in areas outwith America and that he would pull American forces out of non-American areas of conflict. This is one of his promises that he has not kept to. Trump could argue that some American forces need to be provided to ensure the safety of America, but the appliance of these forces is, in many areas, counter productive as it only provokes more aggression from the people native to these areas, which, in turn, creates more problems for the seen to be invaders.

Great care and attention needs to be applied before any country inflicts their forces on any other independent country.

Unfortunately it is a human trait that we feel we need to intervene, without considering all the consequences, in many areas of the world and in doing so cause many conflicts that may not have occurred, should they have not intervened.

Why can we not all agree to live in peace, which would be then beneficial to us all.

 

Storm over Trump climate tweet : euro News


Bitterly cold weather across the northern United States has brought record snow fall and frozen parts of New York’s Lake Erie.

President Donald Trump say in a tweet that it’s proof he was right to pull the country out of the Paris climate agreement.

“In the East, it could be the COLDEST New Year’s Eve on record. Perhaps we could use a little bit of that good old Global Warming that our Country, but not other countries, was going to pay TRILLIONS OF DOLLARS to protect against. Bundle up!”

 

Source: Storm over Trump climate tweet : euro News

Donald Trump has spent a year lying shamelessly. It hasn’t worked | Toronto Star


WASHINGTON—If you are looking for anecdotal evidence that evidence no longer matters in American politics, you can call up someone like Lana Shardea.

Shardea, a 73-year-old in Phoenix, believes Donald Trump is “the most intelligent, powerful, courageous president we’ve had in years,” a man with not just knowledge but “superpower knowledge.” She didn’t pay close attention to politics before Trump came along, but she knows enough to know the mainstream media is unfair to him. Thus, she has found three alternative sources of information.

She follows Trump’s tweets. She watches video from pro-Trump cable channel One America News. And she relies on her friends on Facebook, where she recently shared videos from Fox News and an article from a website called TheRealConservative.info. Its headline: “Rothschild: Donald Trump is threatening to destroy the New World Order.”

Shardea is genuinely confused when she is told that many people believe Trump is dishonest. This president, she says, never changes his personality even a little bit. Isn’t “take me the way I am” the very definition of honesty?

“I don’t see how anybody can say he’s dishonest,” she said. “Dishonest about what? What would it be that he’s dishonest about?”

About almost everything, honestly.

On the day of his inauguration, Trump lied about the weather. The next day, he lied about the size of his inauguration crowd. He has become no less brazen in the 11 months since. The president who won’t change isn’t so much untruthful as anti-truthful, his words so frequently and flagrantly wrong that they amount to a comprehensive rejection of the very idea of accuracy.

The Star has counted 978 false claims since his inauguration, an average of three per day, about everything from media outlets to legislation to the head of the Boy Scouts calling him to pay him a compliment. (Didn’t happen. He just made it up.) As Trump careens from policy to policy and outrage to outrage, lying has been the most consistent feature of his presidency.

 

Source: Donald Trump has spent a year lying shamelessly. It hasn’t worked | Toronto Star

The Beauty In Different


The true meaning of Christianity and being a Christian.

Hope For The Broken

It’s sad to say, but it’s true.. Too often Christians are known for what we are against.. Not for what we are for. Not all of us.. Not all of the time.. But a lot of the time.

Sometimes people are turned off by the church in general. And hear me when I say that THE CHURCH is not the building. Sometimes it’s because they feel judged by those in the church. Other times it’s because of a past incident in the church where they were treated like an outcast. An outcast. Cast out.. think about it. We, as Authentic Followers of Christ Jesus should not cast someone away just because they are different.

We are called to love like Jesus. Is it always easy? I think you know the answer to that. It is only possible if we let Jesus love through us.

I love my church. One of…

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I Want to Show What Depression Looks Like So No One Else Suffers in Silence – by Faris Khalifa


It is great when you find a way of releaving some of the suffering, but one of the main problems is finding that release.

I wish you well for the future.

Kindness Blog

I’m often asked about how I feel since I came out about my mental illness to the world and the answer is always the same: I’ve never felt better.

I was instantly reminded of my favorite quote from Tyrion Lannister of “Game of Thrones,” when he said:

“Never forget what you are; the rest of the world will not. Wear it like armor, and it can never be used to hurt you.”

I saw the world from a totally different angle and that’s all it took, a change of perspective. I found that all of that energy used to hide, to wear that mask, was draining me, but now I hide no more. As cliche as it sounds, I guess this is what it feels like when people say they got a second lease on life.

Through your weaknesses, you find strength and through accepting who you are, you’ll find…

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Why parents want to believe in a vaccine conspiracy


Original post from The Washington Post

‘….. March 6 at 7:00 PM

Susan Senator lives in Brookline, Mass.

For the first three years of my son’s life, I lived a kind of “Gaslight” experience. Sometimes everything seemed fine. But other times, ordinary activities such as piling him into the stroller and going to the park would feel odd somehow, false. Something was not right, but I could not say what or why. I felt as though I was playing the part of mommy, while the real me was clenched up somewhere in the background, nauseated with an unnamed fear for my son.

Nat had autism, but I didn’t know it. It was 1993 when he was diagnosed, and no one in my circle had a child with autism or even really knew what it was. When I had Nat evaluated, I asked whether I had caused it. “Oh, no, no one believes that anymore,” the doctor said, soothing me with his pragmatic, scientific manner. “Autism is neurological, genetic most likely.”

I was grateful to hear this, but only for a little while, because the real problem was still autism. Around the time Nat turned 8, he hit a rough patch that lasted years. He stopped sleeping on any kind of regular nighttime schedule, and he began to exhibit all sorts of difficult behaviors — false, maniacal laughter, hitting and pinching, breaking things. I didn’t know how to get him to calm down, and I feared for his safety. And because so little was known about autism, no one could really help us. In a way, I found myself back at the beginning, researching the condition, trying to figure out why. Why Nat? Why me?

When I came across the theory that the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine could cause autism, it made a kind of Old World sense to me. From what I could gather, it sounded as though the vaccine might blow apart some young children’s immune systems, making them susceptible to all kinds of conditions. I was so worn down, so miserable in those days that I was desperate to believe there was a culprit, something or someone to blame. It was a relief to think that the problem wasn’t my DNA but an outside aggressor, a mistake caused by the medical establishment’s hubris.

 I wondered, if this is true, what should I do? Shouldn’t I sue someone? Kill someone, even? I felt suffocated by anger and horror and also by not knowing what to do next. But the more I thought it through, the less clarity I had.

My husband and my mother told me I had to move on, for how could we ever really know whether the vaccine was the cause? I heard them. I also heard the whisper of those very early days with Nat, when doubt needled me. Something had been off — subtle, but there — before his vaccinations.

So I did more research, and I learned that scientific organizations around the world — including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health — had proved the vaccine theory false. No one could say for sure what caused autism, but they certainly could say that it wasn’t a vaccine.

In hindsight, it’s easy to understand why some parents of children with autism want to see conspiracy and evil where none exists. Living with a person with autism can be devastatingly difficult, and learning that truth about vaccines didn’t really help me. Autism seemed to have stolen my son, and he was getting worse. He’d been expelled from school for his aggression. I needed help, and his therapists kept quitting because they were afraid of him. I was afraid of him. I was sick of my life.

I hung on, of course. Spring came. Somewhere I found the strength to keep my family together and to try one or two new things with Nat, such as signing him up for a Special Olympics gymnastics team. Nat started to do better. Nothing earth-shattering, but he was communicating a little more, and he seemed a bit more tolerant of other people. It was the first time I experienced coming through a bad time, finding a light at the end of the tunnel, with Nat.

Now I look back and see that something was indeed shifting in Nat — and in me. Maybe one influenced the other: He felt my happiness, he grew confident, he succeeded at more things and felt my approval. The change was gradual. Yet it was also all at once. I remember one heart-stopping moment when we shared a laugh on the living room couch, and his warm eyes held mine for a sliver of a second. I knew he was in there, and that was enough.

I didn’t get a perfect kid or a perfect life. No one does. But when you’re a young, scared parent, you will grasp at anything to make sense of a hardship such as autism. I know that firsthand. But the MMR vaccine does not cause autism. And more important, autism is not the only tough thing that can happen in this life. A return of deadly diseases kept at bay by vaccines would be far worse.

 Whatever caused Nat’s autism did not crush him. He is all there. Still very autistic but growing toward the light nevertheless.  …………….’

Christmas Miracle – True Story


A true miracle, the power of faith, love and believing.

Madamsabi's Blog

This is a real Christmas miracle story, happened in December 1997 in Wisconsin, USA.

image

A little girl named Sarah had leukemia and was not expected to live to see Christmas. Her brother and grandmother went to the mall to ask Mark Leonard who was a professional Santa Claus to visit the hospital to give Sarah the gift of hope through encouragement and prayer.

A year later Sarah surprised Santa by showing up at the mall where he worked. Here goes the story.

A little boy and his grandmother came to see Santa at The Mayfair Mall in Wisconsin. The child climbed up on Santa’s lap, holding a picture of a little girl.

“Who is this?” – asked Santa, smiling. “Your friend? Your sister?”

“Yes, Santa.” – he replied.

“My sister, Sarah, who is very sick.” – he said sadly.

Santa glanced over at the grandmother who was waiting nearby and…

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