When neglected children become adolescents: Study of children in Romanian orphanages tells cautionary tale about family separation — ScienceDaily


Many migrant children separated from their parents at the U.S. border, some of them very young, have landed in shelters where they often experience stress, neglect and minimal social and cognitive stimulation. The latest findings of the long-running Bucharest Early Intervention Project (BEIP), involving children in Romanian orphanages tells a cautionary tale about the psychiatric and social risks of long-term deprivation and separation from parents.

BEIP has shown that children reared in very stark institutional settings, with severe social deprivation and neglect, are at risk for cognitive problems, depression, anxiety, disruptive behavior and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. But BEIP has also shown that placing children with quality foster families can mitigate some of these effects, if it’s done early.

The latest BEIP study, published this week by JAMA Psychiatry, asked what happens to the mental health of institutionalized children as they transition to adolescence. Outcomes at ages 8, 12 and 16 suggest diverging trajectories between children who remained in institutions versus those randomly chosen for placement with carefully vetted foster families.

Researchers led by Mark Wade, PhD, and Charles Nelson, PhD, of the Division of Developmental Medicine at Boston Children’s Hospital, studied 220 children of whom 119 had spent at least some time in institutions. Of the 119, half had been placed in foster care.

 

Source: When neglected children become adolescents: Study of children in Romanian orphanages tells cautionary tale about family separation — ScienceDaily

Impaired recycling of mitochondria in autism? Study of tuberous sclerosis, a syndrome associated with autism, suggests a new treatment approach — ScienceDaily


Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), a genetic disorder that causes autism in about half of those affected, could stem from a defect in a basic system cells use to recycle their mitochondria, report scientists. They believe their findings open new treatment possibilities not just for TSC, but possibly for other forms of autism and some neurologic disorders.

Source: Impaired recycling of mitochondria in autism? Study of tuberous sclerosis, a syndrome associated with autism, suggests a new treatment approach — ScienceDaily