UK MEP Richard Ashworth’s speech warning Europeans of ‘cautionary tale’ of Brexit receives standing ovation – inews.co.uk


  • He said no Prime Minister had ever explained the benefits of the EU
  • His speech received a standing ovation

British MEP Richard Ashworth’s speech in the European Parliament on Wednesday claiming Brexit was a “cautionary tale” to Europe has received a significant response on social media getting shared by many across the continent.

The MEP for South East England, who had the Conservative Party whip removed after voting against Brexit proceeding to the next stage of negotiations in October, gave a speech in what is expected to be one of the final debates UK parliamentarians can participate in ahead of Brexit.

Watch: Donald Tusk calls on European Parliament to represent British people 

He welcomed the comments made by European Council President Donald Tusk, who had called on the MEPs in Strasbourg to be open to the UK participating in the Parliament’s next term in the event of an extension.

He welcomed the comments made by European Council President Donald Tusk, who had called on the MEPs in Strasbourg to be open to the UK participating in the Parliament’s next term in the event of an extension. ‘I want to say thank you’

 

Source: UK MEP Richard Ashworth’s speech warning Europeans of ‘cautionary tale’ of Brexit receives standing ovation – inews.co.uk

Theresa May Brexit deal hammered in parliament, but be wary of prospects of a new ‘consensus’ approach : The Conversation


Another day, another record. The 230 majority against the motion to approve Theresa May’s withdrawal agreement on the UK’s exit from the EU smashes pretty much any parliamentary record one cares to discover.

That May’s immediate response was to make time for the house to debate and vote on Labour’s motion of no-confidence in her the day after her loss was thus hardly a surprise: how else to respond to such a heavy blow against the central platform and policy of the government?

And yet the abiding impression of these events was of avoiding a resolution, for as long as possible. Most obviously, May did not offer her resignation. That was a reflection not of her principles but rather her analysis of the situation. As she noted in her statement, a lack of majority for her deal doesn’t mean there’s a majority for another course of action. Without that alternative majority, she clearly feels there is still everything to play for and she is the right person for the job.

In essence, what May offered parliament was a “put-up or shut-up” proposition. Should the government win the confidence motion – which looks very likely indeed – she will hold a series of cross-party talks, inviting parliament to bring ideas and suggestions about how to build a majority position. The results will then be put to the EU for negotiation and agreement.

 

Source: Theresa May Brexit deal hammered in parliament, but be wary of prospects of a new ‘consensus’ approach : The Conversation

Brexit deal amendments: here’s what MPs will deal with before tonight’s meaningful vote : i News


MPs are set to have their say on Theresa May‘s contentious Brexit deal tonight. But before the meaningful vote, there will be smaller votes on a series of amendments to the bill.

Ahead of tonight, Speaker of the House of Commons John Bercow revealed which amendments, characterised as changes to the wording of a bill or a motion, he had selected for consideration for voting.

From more than 10 proposed amendments from across the political parties, he has provisionally selected the following four in relation to Theresa May’s withdrawal agreement, which states:

That this House approves for the purposes of section 13(1)(b) of the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018, the negotiated withdrawal agreement laid before the House on Monday 26 November 2018 with the title ‘Agreement on the withdrawal of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland from the European Union and the European Atomic Energy Community’ and the framework for the future relationship laid before the House on Monday 26 November 2018 with the title ‘Political Declaration setting out the framework for the future relationship between the European Union and the United Kingdom’.

Amendment A – from Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn

This is Labour’s attempt to reject the Prime Minister’s deal because it does not include a permanent customs union. The party wants to “pursue every option” to prevent the UK leaving the EU with no deal.

Line 1, leave out from “House” to end and insert “declines to approve the negotiated withdrawal agreement and the framework for the future relationship because it fails to provide for a permanent UK-EU customs union and strong single market deal and would therefore lead to increased barriers to trade in goods and services, would not protect workers’ rights and environmental standards, allows for the diminution of the United Kingdom’s internal and external security and is likely to lead to the implementation of a backstop provision in Northern Ireland that is neither politically nor economically sustainable; declines to approve the United Kingdom’s leaving the European Union without a withdrawal agreement; and therefore resolves to pursue every option that prevents the United Kingdom’s either leaving the European Union without a withdrawal agreement or leaving on the basis of the negotiated withdrawal agreement laid before the House.”

 

Source: Brexit deal amendments: here’s what MPs will deal with before tonight’s meaningful vote : i News

Brexit: is it possible to stop it? : The Conversation


Stopping Brexit is possible, but it’s complicated. I’m not arguing here that no Brexit is going to happen, only that it is legally and practically possible, and recent events render it slightly more likely.

The only way Brexit can be stopped is if the Article 50 notification, triggered in March 2017 to begin the UK’s departure from the EU, is revoked. Under EU law, once Article 50 is triggered, the departing state automatically leaves the EU after two years, unless Article 50 is extended.

Unfortunately, the short text of Article 50 doesn’t say whether the departing state can unilaterally revoke its notification to leave, or whether the consent of the remaining EU member states is required. A case, currently under consideration by the European Court of Justice (CJEU), will determine just that.

On December 4, the advocate general, Campos Sánchez-Bordona, issued his opinion to the court, arguing that Article 50 is unilaterally revocable. He argued that if the consent of the EU27 was required, this could lead to the departing state being forced to leave the EU against its will, which would be unacceptable.

If the CJEU upholds this opinion in its final judgement due on December 10 – which is not guaranteed – the UK would be able to revoke Article 50 unilaterally, provided it was acting in good faith.

Changes needed to UK law

A revocation of Article 50 would have to be initiated by the UK. It’s anticipated that parliamentary approval, via an act of parliament, would also be required to revoke Article 50, although some constitutional lawyers disagree. Even if parliamentary approval was not legally required, it’s difficult to imagine the government revoking Article 50 without parliament’s backing.

 

Source: Brexit: is it possible to stop it? : The Conversation

Theresa May’s Brexit Deal Doesn’t Come Close To Protecting Workers’ Rights | HuffPost UK


For the past two years trade unions have been clear that any Brexit deal would have to safeguard rights at work, otherwise we couldn’t support it. Theresa May brushed off our concerns, insisting that her deal would “protect and enhance” rights at work. Well as of last week, we know for sure that it doesn’t.

And we’re not talking about abstract regulations here, the kind no one really understands. We’re talking about everyday protections that really matter to working people. Like paid holidays, rights for part-time workers, time off for working mums and dads, equal pay for women and limits on working hours.

These rights were won by trade unionists through the EU, and we’ve been clear that leaving the EU must not put them at risk. And building on that, working people need a long-term, binding guarantee that rights in the UK will keep pace with those across Europe.

But the government’s deal doesn’t come close to meeting this test.

In both the proposals for the transition period and for our future relationship with the EU – and whether we end up with the backstop or a free trade agreement – our rights are under real threat.

First, while the Tory right is up in arms about a transition where they say everything will stay the same, the reality is that on employment rights UK workers will lose out. Under the government’s plans, new EU rights that come into force after the transition won’t apply to UK workers.

Second, after the transition, the rights of British workers look set to fall far behind those of workers across Europe. And it’s not clear how any agreement on rights between the EU and UK will be enforced.

Third, and worst of all, the only employment rights commitments that cover our future relationship with the EU are in the draft Political Declaration. Unfortunately, this section of the agreement is non-binding: it’s not worth the paper it’s written on.

A future government of Tory Brexiteers could easily ignore its intention and try to negotiate a free trade agreement that undermines our hard-won workplace protections.

 

Source: Theresa May’s Brexit Deal Doesn’t Come Close To Protecting Workers’ Rights | HuffPost UK

Theresa May’s Brexit deal gets Cabinet approval – but PM faces new threats to topple her – Mirror Online


Theresa May tonight announced the Cabinet has AGREED her Brexit deal in a marathon five-hour summit – but she already faces new threats to topple her.

The Prime Minister branded the decision a “decisive step” adding: “I firmly believe with my head and my heart that this is a decision in the best interests of our entire United Kingdom.”

To screams of “STOP BREXIT” by protesters outside the Downing Street gates, Mrs May admitted the meeting involved “long, detailed and impassioned debate”.

“The choices before us were difficult,” she added, especially on the Northern Ireland border, and there would be “difficult days ahead” with “intense scrutiny” on the deal.

As the 585-page document was published in full tonight, she said a “collective decision of Cabinet” was taken to back it – adding it “was the best that could be negotiated”.

EU chief negotiator Michel Barnier declared talks had reached a “crucial stage” after an “extraordinary” process.

 

Source: Theresa May’s Brexit deal gets Cabinet approval – but PM faces new threats to topple her – Mirror Online

Brexit deal text agreed by EU and UK, May’s ministers to meet – BBC


LONDON (Reuters) – The European Union and Britain have agreed a draft Brexit divorce deal text and Prime Minister Theresa May will present the agreement to her senior ministers on Wednesday, the BBC said.

 

Source: Brexit deal text agreed by EU and UK, May’s ministers to meet – BBC