Care England warns of ‘mounting workforce crisis’ ahead of NLW rise : Care Home Professional


Care England has warned the Government of a “mounting workforce crisis” ahead of the introduction of the new National Living Wage (NLW) in April.

Source: Care England warns of ‘mounting workforce crisis’ ahead of NLW rise : Care Home Professional

Care England calls for additional funding with rise in National Living Wage : Care Home Professional


Care England has said more social care funding is needed to help providers shoulder the cost of a higher National Living Wage (NLW).

Source: Care England calls for additional funding with rise in National Living Wage : Care Home Professional

Care England asks that newly appointed councillors get to grips with social care costs | Care Industry News


Care England, a representative body for independent providers of social care, has again expressed its disappointment over the paltry fee offers from Local Authorities (LAs)  and Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs).

Professor Martin Green OBE, Chief Executive of Care England says:

“Yet again, Local Authorities and CCGs are only now beginning to make their fee offers to care providers.  It is unbelievable that we are in this position again.   If the care sector is to plan efficiently to provide the necessary high quality care it is unfathomable as to how this can happen with such a time lag, uncertainty and of course negligible or zero uplifts”.

With the Green Paper on Social Care looming it has never been more apparent the strain that the health and social care sector is under.  A degree of professionalism is therefore needed from Local Authorities and CCGs where fee offers are made promptly at the beginning of the financial year rather than a month, or more, later.

Whilst most fee rates for 2018/19 remain a mystery, a few LAs and CCGs have issued notices about what they will pay for care home placements this year. Of those known, there is already a worrying trend of rates not keeping pace with rising costs – putting increasing pressure on an already fragile care market. Examples include Bromley CCG (as with many other CCGs) only awarding a 0.1% uplift and Staffordshire County Council offering a 1.0% uplift for existing residents.  However, what is even more worrying is the increasing movement towards reverse auctions, such as that by Birmingham City Council, which drives down prices paid and treats individuals as commodities.

 

Source: Care England asks that newly appointed councillors get to grips with social care costs | Care Industry News

Care England granted right to intervene in Court of Appeal Sleep-in shift case | Care Industry News


The UK’s care sector has been thrown a lifeline as Care England, the largest representative body for independent providers of adult social care, has won the right to intervene in the Court of Appeal’s sleep-in-shift case – with the hope of solving the impending £400million financial crisis for care providers.  

With the hearing set for 20-21 March this year, law firm Anthony Collins Solicitors are acting for Care England, with the body given the opportunity to pursue new arguments not yet considered in the Royal Mencap Society vs Tomlinson-Blake Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) case to date.

Professor Martin Green OBE, Chief Executive at Care England, which has 160 members providing over 3,500 care services, said:

“I cannot stress the magnitude of this opportunity for our members and the care industry as a whole. If the existing decision of the Employment Appeal Tribunal is upheld it would be a watershed moment for the sector, with profound affects for the viability of residential domiciliary and supported care which supports 1.2 million vulnerable people across the country.

 

Source: Care England granted right to intervene in Court of Appeal Sleep-in shift case | Care Industry News

‘Care Act breach’ judicial review over provider fees dismissed : Community Care


A judge has dismissed a judicial review brought by national care provider body Care England against a local authority it said had breached its Care Act duties by setting fees too low.

Care England argued that Essex council had fixed the fees it offered to providers under a new commissioning framework at a level “significantly below their costs of care”.

It said this contravened section 5 of the Care Act, which stipulates local authorities must promote an efficient and effective care market and “have regard” to ensuring its sustainability.

The issue was highlighted last month by a report from the Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) which found care home operators had been charging self-funding residents an average of 41% more than council-funded ones in order to remain solvent.

 

Source : ‘Care Act breach’ judicial review over provider fees dismissed : Community Care

Ombudsman highlights the power of complaints to improve social care : Care Industry News


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The impact of an individual complaint in improving care services for others is being highlighted in a new report by the Local Government and Social Care Ombudsman.

The Ombudsman’s Review of Adult Social Care Complaints reveals councils and care providers implemented more than 1,300 recommendations to put things right for people in 2016/17.

As well as putting things right for an individual, the Ombudsman makes recommendations to improve services for others by changing policies and procedures, training staff, or recommending a service be provided.

Within the Ombudsman’s 1,318 recommendations, councils and care providers made nearly 180 procedural changes and committed to train staff on nearly 50 occasions.

In some cases the result of a single investigation leads to the Ombudsman looking at injustices caused to people who haven’t complained. Examples of this over the past year include one person’s complaint about the way a council charged for care leading to more than 60 people, who had been similarly affected, receiving refunds.

In another case a couple complained about their council’s blanket policy to reduce the level of care it provided, and nearly 70 other families had their care reviewed following the Ombudsman’s investigation.

Michael King, Local Government and Social Care Ombudsman, said:

“I want to highlight the power that one person speaking up can have in changing services for the better for everyone.

“Our recommendations not only put things right for individuals, but aim to help councils and care providers avoid the same problems affecting others. Where we think a fault was caused by a procedural or policy issue, we recommend ways to review and change those practices.”

The report also welcomes the increase in complaints the Ombudsman has received about independent care providers. This reflects the growing importance the sector is placing on making the complaints process more visible and informing people of their rights to come to the Ombudsman.

Mr King also encouraged those organisations – both public and independently owned – where complaints were taken on board, and analysed, at the most senior level.

He said:

“Strong leadership in the sector is essential to foster a true learning culture from complaints. Good leaders will empower their staff to respond quickly and with confidence to customer concerns, and ensure the learning from complaints is actively owned at a cabinet or board level.

“When things do go wrong, it is those organisations with such strong leadership which are best placed to gain from the outcome of our investigations.”

Professor Martin Green OBE, Chief Executive of Care England, said:

“In a sector being squeezed in all directions, it is heartening to see providers being praised for making the role of the Local Government and Social Care Ombudsman better known and take a lead in learning from complaints, particularly in addressing self-funder complaints.

“It is right and proper that the sector works with the Ombudsman to create a more robust system where there is more confidence in care providers.”

Andrea Sutcliffe, CQC’s Chief Inspector of Adult Social Care, said:

“This report from the Local Government and Social Care Ombudsman reinforces how important it is for people, their families and carers, to experience good, safe care that is responsive to their individual needs.

“CQC’s own State of Care report highlights the critical role strong leadership has in delivering high quality care and bringing about improvement. Being open to feedback, acting appropriately on people’s complaints and actively seeking out ways to put things right are essential elements of this.

“I encourage providers to use this report to reflect on how they listen and learn from people’s experiences, concerns and complaints. If all services did this then the quality of care would be better for everyone which is what we all want to see.”

 

Source : Ombudsman highlights the power of complaints to improve social care : Care Industry News

Extra social care funding from Government is not reaching the front line | Care Industry News


Providers understand the pressure that local authorities and CCGs are under, but as ADASS’ Budget Survey demonstrates, continued provider attrition threatens t

Source: Extra social care funding from Government is not reaching the front line | Care Industry News

Care England secures Judicial Review against Essex County Council challenging care home fees | Care Industry News


Care England, a representative body for independent providers of adult social care, despite opposition from Essex Council, has obtained the Court’s permission to proceed with its Judicial Review proceedings against Essex County Council challenging the fee rates its pays to independent care home providers.

Professor Martin Green OBE Chief Executive for Care England says:

Care England is deeply concerned about the Council’s conduct towards the care home market within Essex and as a result, the sustainability of that market”.

The Judicial Review challenge brought by Care England seeks to challenge the lawfulness of the Council’s fee setting decision in respect of the Old Contract and its refusal to review the rates under the New Contract.  Care England believes the Council’s actions to date to be a breach of its responsibilities under the Care Act 2014.

Source: Care England secures Judicial Review against Essex County Council challenging care home fees | Care Industry News

Government has not addressed the social care crisis as elderly and vulnerable left to fend for themselves | Care Industry News


This local government finance settlement represents a missed opportunity to set out a  social care long-term strategy on sustainable funding

Source: Government has not addressed the social care crisis as elderly and vulnerable left to fend for themselves | Care Industry News