Government Guidance on Covid safe visits for care home residents and families | Care Industry News


• Visits should be tailored to residents and facilities and should prioritise residents and staff’s safety to limit the transmission of Covid-19 • Care homes, especially those who haven’t allowed visits since March, will be encouraged and supported to provide safe visiting opportunities as new national restrictions come into effect • Measures put in place should provide Covid-secure opportunities for families to meet using visiting arrangements such as floor to ceiling screens, visiting pods, and window visits

Source: Government Guidance on Covid safe visits for care home residents and families | Care Industry

 

 

Social care challenge appears to be getting worse – By Silva Homes | Care Industry News


Indeed Social Care is in crisis and has been for many years, this is down to a number of factors

lack of Government investment
abysmal staff salaries
lack of care workers
unsocial hours
poor working conditions
no staff sick pay scheme
and many others

I put lack of Government investment at the top because if this was solved then some of the others could also be.

As to investment in social care, this has never been sufficient, but 10 years of austerity cuts and now COVID-19 have made the crisis very more serious.

So, lets look at social care, before 1970 social care was administered by a ‘mishmash’ of organisations

local authorities
charities
voluntary sector
health
and many others

But in 1970 the Government of the day decided to bring all social care to be administered by local authorities, but true to form, the Government did not provide anywhere near the funding that was required and over the years the gap from what funding is provided to what is actually required has been increasing.

Many Governments in the last few years have promised to solve the funding process and a considerable amount of the work required as already been done.

In fact, in the David Cameron Governments they were prepared to go ahead in 2015, but decided to defer until April 2020.

Now in April 2020 we were in the COVID-19 pandemic and still are, so was this the reason for no action, who knows.

But, urgent action needs to be taken, not just for care homes, but the whole of Social care which includes home care, respite, supported living, hospices for both children and adults as well as care homes.

Well some action has occurred for in July 2020, an advisor was appointed on the proposal for the NHS to take over social care.

So, action has been taken, but how is it proceeding, who knows?

Governments are ‘ace’ at putting proposals forward and creating working groups, but they are not good at putting proposals into action and thereby solve the crisis and they could well be lost in the ‘black hole’ of Government.

To ensure actions are finalised, I created the petition, Solve the crisis in Social Care, https://you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/solve-the-crisis-in-social-care.

Please consider looking at the petition and, if you agree, please sign and share.

Should you require more information this can be found here.

 

 

Source: Social care challenge appears to be getting worse – By Silva Homes | Care Industry News

Lockdown has brought families of learning disabled people to their knees | Learning disability | The Guardian


The support system so many rely on was struggling before the coronavirus crisis. Now it is truly broken

Source: Lockdown has brought families of learning disabled people to their knees | Learning disability | The Guardian

BREAKING NEWS: PM announces £600m infection control funding for care homes : Care Home Professional


Prime Minister Boris Johnson has today announced a £600m infection control funding package to help combat the spread of the coronavirus in care homes.

Source: BREAKING NEWS: PM announces £600m infection control funding for care homes : Care Home Professional

Coronavirus has exposed the gaping holes in social care. But it is also a chance for change | Polly Toynbee | Opinion | The Guardian


This crisis might achieve one thing: voters supporting Andy Burnham’s plan to bring social care into the NHS, says the Guardian columnist Polly Toynbee

Source: Coronavirus has exposed the gaping holes in social care. But it is also a chance for change | Polly Toynbee | Opinion | The Guardian

Lack of social care reform could see millions delay financial plans to meet care needs | Care Industry News


‘All talk, no action’ on social care reforms could see two million more people delay financial plans to meet care needs before the next general election • Two-thirds of over 75s delaying financial planning for later life care until policy is clear

Source: Lack of social care reform could see millions delay financial plans to meet care needs | Care Industry News

New campaign to support LGBT people living with dementia | Care Industry News


The Guinness Partnership is proud to announce its support for a new campaign to ensure lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans (LGBT) people affected by dementia have their voices heard and can get better access to support and advice services.

Source: New campaign to support LGBT people living with dementia | Care Industry News

Report on adult social care-Winter crisis, new challenges and opportunities for care sector | Care Industry News


Specialist business property adviser, Christie & Co has published its fourth annual report on adult social care. The report highlights the sector’s continued funding and staffing challenges, as well as the causes and impacts of winter 2017/18 which saw unprecedented levels of pressure on NHS hospital trusts, with 24 trusts reporting a ‘Code Black’ state across the UK.

The report, ‘Adult Social Care 2018: Funding, Staffing and the Winter Crisis’, also presents data gathered from surveys of local authorities and over 200 leading operators across elderly and specialist care in the UK, particularly looking at the use of agency staff, costs and fees, and how the Government’s additional funding has been utilised.

The 2018 report outlines the continued challenges the sector faces in both recruiting and retaining trained staff. Whilst the removal of the cap on Tier 2 visas for overseas nurses is a positive development, we observed a 13% drop in total nurse registrations. Uncertainty over Brexit has had a material impact on EU nurse registrations which fell by 87% compared with 2016/17 figures.

While favourable immigration policies and overseas nurses are key in helping bridge the current gap, the ability to train and retain UK nurses remains a key issue. Our report highlights that 30% of undergraduate students do not complete their nursing degrees.

Our operator survey responses showed that agency staff are becoming more expensive, despite 69% of elderly care operators reporting that they managed to hold or reduce agency staff usage. In specialist care, agency usage has gone up marginally whilst overall agency costs have fallen, indicating that agency staff are being used for lower paid support staff roles in specialist care, as opposed to more expensive, trained nursing staff.

Both our operator and local authority surveys have shown reasonable overall levels of fee increases, albeit for elderly care, these fall below the average fee rate increases shown in our 2017 report. Our surveys show that considerable regional variation continues, with funding remaining a critical issue as we await the anticipated Government Green Paper this autumn.

 

Source: Report on adult social care-Winter crisis, new challenges and opportunities for care sector | Care Industry News

Care operators should review their contracts and practices, now | Care Industry News


The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) final guidance on care contracts and consumer law obligations is expected to be published in mid-October.

The guidance will, says law firm Royds Withy King, have wide-reaching implications for care homes and care providers, requiring them to review the way they operate in terms of admissions procedures, marketing, and how they contract with service users.

Care providers who do not comply with consumer legislation will need to make significant and substantial changes to their service user contracts or risk substantial fines and enforcement action from the CMA, Trading Standards, CQC, and directly from service users.

Hazel Phillips, Head of Royds Withy King’s dedicated Social Care team said: “The CMA believes that many care providers are breaking consumer law through their current practices.  Its initial report was published at the end of 2017, with its final guidance expected mid-October.

“The CMA is already scrutinising the practices of larger operators and we would expect them to shortly turn their sights onto all care providers.  Most service user contracts we see do not comply with consumer legislation.  Practices and contracts need to be reviewed and changed as quickly as possible to avoid penalties or more damaging legal action.”

The CMA has raised concerns around a number of practices including:

  • Inaccurate and misleading information on websites and in marketing materials
  • Charging fees for prolonged periods after death
  • Asking for substantial upfront payments
  • Making hidden charges for ‘extra services’
  • Charging fees for absences
  • Failing to provide contracts, or providing contracts which are vague and unclear
  • Asking third parties to act as a guarantor for care fees in inappropriate circumstances
  • Charging third party top-ups without due regard to the Care Act and Care & Support Statutory Guidance and the NHS Continuing Healthcare framework
  • Increasing fees in an unfair manner
  • Lack of transparency around the treatment of Funded Nursing Care contribution
  • Unfair termination clauses

Hazel Phillips says: “The CMA guidance proposes tha

 

Source: Care operators should review their contracts and practices, now | Care Industry News