Fly into Caring


Coffey again lets her mind let loose, but in reality the crisis in the Aviation professions and the Care profession should not be used as a matter of flippancy as they should both be taken seriously.

Yes, the job situation in the aviation professions is the current lack of jobs due to COVID-19 and its effect on the economy , while in the care profession the job situation is the abundance of job vacancies due to Government underinvestment, working conditions and the ever extending market for people needing care.

Within care it is not just people fitting in for they need to have the expertise to care, listen to the person for whom they are caring for and proceed within the limitations of the cared for persons choice.

It is not that ‘one fits all’ for the persons in need of care will have a multitude of reasons why care is needed and some of these reasons could change on a day to day basis, or even within the day. There is never enough time allocated in the care package to fully extend to all the persons needs, as in short visits of 15 mins to 1 hour could mean that there is a choice required to whether, dressing, toileting, eating and drinking, emotional support and others is provided and which are not.

So, flippancy is not the order of the day for each area, aviation and care the need to a large extent is massive Government financial investment, which is not forthcoming, well, certainly not for care.

For, within care the Government intentions appear to be to enhance deaths, for it was in the situation of hospital discharges from hospitals into care homes. But deaths could be the result in any areas of care, be it, home care, respite, hospices, supported living, etc.

This situation within care has been the case, well before COVID-19, but COVID-19 is just another catalyst for care to cope with.

Care, (Social Care) is in a very serious crisis and that is the reason I created the petition, Solve the crisis in Social Care, https://you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/solve-the-crisis-in-social-care

If more information is required please see,

https://1drv.ms/w/s!Aq2MsYduiazgoBjtY1Dpe14ktF4j?e=sJYSLV

You may not, currently, require Social Care, but, sooner or later, you may well do so and if the crisis is not solved, then the Social Care you then require may not be there.

Govt Newspeak

DWP chief Therese Coffey has suggested that sacked cabin crew should go work in care homes. She said: it might not be their ‘dream job’ but it could be ‘very useful’ as thousands of aviation workers face an uncertain future she has prompted fury by suggesting sacked cabin crew can retrain as carers.

she hasn’t been on the foodbank diet recently!

Therese Coffey claimed thousands of airline staff made redundant after planes were grounded and international travel ground to a halt in the coronavirus crisis should switch careers.

She told The Spectator: “I want to encourage them to perhaps go into teaching or go to college and to be the people who train the next lot of people who are going to do those jobs.” She added: “How do we help draw out of them the transferable skills that they have, and that could be working in social care?

“It…

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Lockdown has brought families of learning disabled people to their knees | Edel Harris | Society | The Guardian


The support system so many rely on was struggling before the coronavirus crisis. Now it is truly broken

Source: Lockdown has brought families of learning disabled people to their knees | Edel Harris | Society | The Guardian

 

 

Austerity ‘ripped resilience out of health and care service’ before Covid-19 crisis hit, says IPPR | Care Industry News


Underinvestment in social and community care left four in five hospitals with ‘dangerously low’ spare beds as crisis hit

Major new analysis of the state of the health and care system in England in the run up to the Covid-19 pandemic today reveals the extent of the crisis that was facing medics and carers even before the crisis hit.

Source: Austerity ‘ripped resilience out of health and care service’ before Covid-19 crisis hit, says IPPR | Care Industry News

 

 

Leader warns care homes at ‘breaking point’ as death toll mounts : Care Home Professional


A care home leader has warned the coronavirus is stretching care homes to breaking point as the death toll of residents mounted over the weekend.

Source: Leader warns care homes at ‘breaking point’ as death toll mounts : Care Home Professional

Man with Down’s Syndrome dies as hospital leaves him without food for 20 days


This should be unbelievable, but is it?

Where is the care in our, so called, Society, it appears that it is just another ‘word’ that is not put into practice.

Is our Health Service so fragmented that, specialists health care professionals are unable to understand the basics of nutrition.

Surely with so many professions within the care of Joe, that, not one of them could see, or even understand, that food or some other form of nutrition was not being given to Joe.

Was he not monitored, or did everyone involved in his, so called, care believe it was the responsibility of someone else.

What does this say of the 21st century health care in Manchester, more like 16th century. The care for Joe would have been better in the 3rd World.

There are targets for this, targets for that and targets for the other, so many targets.

Are there too many targets, that these targets are getting in the way of basic health care?

Govt Newspeak

Relatives of Guiseppe “Joe” Ulleri, 61, spoke of a “fragmented” care approach and claimed he was denied food for almost three weeks due to miscommunication.

A man with Down’s syndrome died after 20 days in a hospital bed without food, an inquest heard. The family of Giuseppe “Joe” Ulleri, 61, condemned the ­“fragmented” approach to his care after he was taken to A&E in February 2016 due to a fall at his supported living site in Didsbury, Manchester.

After initially being discharged, he was re-admitted and found to have fractures to his pelvis, wrist and neck. His carers were told he needed surgery and as he had some difficulty swallowing due to an ongoing acid reflux problem, he was made “nil by mouth”.

But relatives say he was denied food for almost three weeks due to miscommunication and inaction by staff, which led to him getting fatal pneumonia.

Brother Peter told the…

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Christmas can be isolating for young carers – they need time to be children : The Conversation


Most children look forward to the Christmas holidays as a time for fun and families. But for some young carers – children who provide care for someone in their family who is ill or disabled – the Christmas holidays are a mixed blessing.

Dani* is one such young carer who I worked with as part of recent research. She is 14 and cares for her mum who has Multiple Sclerosis and depression. Dani does most of the cooking and cleaning in the house as well as shopping and managing the family finances.

She also spends time with her mum trying to keep her spirits up and making sure she takes her medication. This means Dani has little, if any, time for socialising. Her mother’s condition also means Dani is sometimes too worried about leaving her mum at home alone to go out with friends, even though her mum would like her to.

Christmas is going to be both good and bad for Dani and her mum. It means Dani spends time with her mum at home and doesn’t have to worry about her as much because they are together. But it also means she has to do a lot more around the house when her mum is too ill to do it, such as cooking, wrapping presents and making sure Christmas is a happy time for them both.

Unrecognised support

For children like Dani, the Christmas holidays can be an emotional time and bring extra challenges. It’s particularly hard if they are having to provide care unrecognised and unsupported, when other family members or friends are not able or available to help, or support services are missing.

This can make caring a lonely and isolating experience for some children. Many of them also have to provide the sort of care we would normally associate with an adult – toileting and bathing a loved one, administering medication, cooking and cleaning, as well as having to look after younger siblings.

 

Source: Christmas can be isolating for young carers – they need time to be children : The Conversation

House of Lords report urges government for clarity on EU healthcare deal | Care Industry News


The House of Lords EU Committee has today published its report Brexit: reciprocal healthcare. The Committee warns that in the absence of an agreement on reciprocal healthcare, the rights of UK citizens to hold an EHIC card for treatment in the EU will cease after Brexit.

Other rights, provided for by the S2 scheme and Patients’ Rights Directive, will likewise come to an end. Without EHIC or an equivalent arrangement it could become much more expensive for UK citizens with chronic conditions – such as dialysis patients and people living with rare diseases – to travel to the EU post-Brexit, for holidays, recuperation or treatment. These people might find it difficult to obtain travel insurance at all.

The Government wishes to maintain reciprocal healthcare arrangements including the EHIC scheme after Brexit, but the current arrangements are designed to support the freedom of movement of EU citizens. The Government intends to stop freedom of movement to the UK, and has not yet set out its objectives for the future UK-EU relationship. The Committee therefore urges the Government to confirm how it will seek to protect reciprocal rights to healthcare of all UK and EU citizens post-Brexit, as part of any agreement on future relations.

The report also argues that it is essential for EU citizens lawfully resident in the UK to have a continuing right to access long-term healthcare, as well as the practical means by which to exercise that right. The Committee therefore calls on the Government to use domestic legislation to clarify the means by which all EU citizens lawfully resident in the UK at the time of Brexit will be able to continue to access essential healthcare.

 

Source: House of Lords report urges government for clarity on EU healthcare deal | Care Industry News

Social care funding can’t take any more setbacks. It needs reform now : The Guardian


The UK is approaching a perfect storm with an ageing population and many people unprepared for the future

Former Liberal Democrat cabinet minister Ed Davey (centre) and campaigners protest against Theresa May’s social care policy during the 2017 general election campaign. Photograph: Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images

For a short while, it seemed like the issue of social care funding would finally be addressed after years of government procrastination. The Conservatives promised a consultation on social care reformU-turned on the so-called dementia tax and, instead, confirmed their intention to cap the amount people pay towards care.

But now that plans to introduce such a cap have been scrapped and the social care consultation is rumoured to have been delayed until next summer, it seems that the government has followed previous administrations and kicked social care funding into the long grass.

Such a decision is worrying and flies in the face of public opinion. A cap on care costs will increase the fairness of social care, so it’s risky to turn our backs on this idea without an alternative plan in place. There are too many vulnerable older people at risk.

Following an election campaign full of confusing messages about social care, Anchor, England’s largest not-for-profit provider of care and housing for older people, conducted a public poll to gather insight into people’s understanding. Our research found that 70% of British adults believe there should be a cap on social care costs, while almost half believe that social care – including dementia care – should always be paid for by the state.

Sir Andrew Dilnot, who first proposed a cap on social care, has cautioned that plans to abandon it could cause a “catastrophic risk” of poverty in older age. And councils have warned that they cannot afford to pay for all those in need of state-funded care if the dementia tax is introduced, putting many providers at risk of going out of business.

The question of how we fund social care remains unanswered, and the most recent suggestions fail to get to the crux of the issue.

Jackie Doyle-Price, the social care minister, suggested that older people should sell their homes to fund their care. But this doesn’t take the full picture into account. There is a perception that all or most older people are well-off and own their own home – this isn’t the case. For those older people who are home owners and are, to quote the minister, “sitting in homes too big for their needs”, we know that two thirds would like to downsize but can’t due to a lack of suitable options.

Again, this comes down to a lack of funding and supportive policies, despite the fact that more retirement housing could save £14.5bn to the public purse over 50 years.

Whichever direction the future of social care funding is heading, and whether a cap is introduced or not, the government must be open and honest about how social care will be paid for so that everyone can plan for the best possible life in older age. At present, this is far from the case.

More than a fifth of people wrongly believe the state pays entirely for care needs in later life, and more than half underestimate social care costs by up to 20%. Considering these misconceptions, it’s no wonder that just 14% of us are currently saving for our care in later life.

We’re approaching a perfect storm where the future of social care funding is unclear, the population is getting older, and most of us are unprepared for the future. We need a transparent and sustainable long-term strategy that integrates social care, health and housing. Recognising, and acting on this, is our only option.

  • Jane Ashcroft is chief executive of Anchor

Source: Social care funding can’t take any more setbacks. It needs reform now : The Guardian