Matt Hancock ‘full steam ahead with NHS privatisation’


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Health Secretary Matt Hancock is proceeding “full steam ahead with NHS privatisation”, as it reveals a total of 21 contracts worth £127m are currently out to tender.

The deals include a £91m contract to run an NHS 111/Clinical Assessment Service in the South East. Some £36m of new NHS contracts have been put out to tender in the last six weeks alone, according to new House of Commons Library analysis.

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Tories with our NHS.png Tory Matt Hancock with pound signs in his eyes

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Care England asks that newly appointed councillors get to grips with social care costs | Care Industry News


Care England, a representative body for independent providers of social care, has again expressed its disappointment over the paltry fee offers from Local Authorities (LAs)  and Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs).

Professor Martin Green OBE, Chief Executive of Care England says:

“Yet again, Local Authorities and CCGs are only now beginning to make their fee offers to care providers.  It is unbelievable that we are in this position again.   If the care sector is to plan efficiently to provide the necessary high quality care it is unfathomable as to how this can happen with such a time lag, uncertainty and of course negligible or zero uplifts”.

With the Green Paper on Social Care looming it has never been more apparent the strain that the health and social care sector is under.  A degree of professionalism is therefore needed from Local Authorities and CCGs where fee offers are made promptly at the beginning of the financial year rather than a month, or more, later.

Whilst most fee rates for 2018/19 remain a mystery, a few LAs and CCGs have issued notices about what they will pay for care home placements this year. Of those known, there is already a worrying trend of rates not keeping pace with rising costs – putting increasing pressure on an already fragile care market. Examples include Bromley CCG (as with many other CCGs) only awarding a 0.1% uplift and Staffordshire County Council offering a 1.0% uplift for existing residents.  However, what is even more worrying is the increasing movement towards reverse auctions, such as that by Birmingham City Council, which drives down prices paid and treats individuals as commodities.

 

Source: Care England asks that newly appointed councillors get to grips with social care costs | Care Industry News

Government takes small step over risk of NHS care home discrimination | DisabledGo News and Blog


The government has taken a small step towards addressing the discrimination faced by service-users with complex healthcare needs who risk being forced into institutions.

Last month, the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) wrote to 13 clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) as the first step in a potential judicial review of their policies on long-term NHS funding for care outside hospital, known as NHS continuing healthcare (NHS CHC).

But the Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) now appears to have quietly altered key guidance on NHS CHC, making it harder for CCGs to continue to discriminate against disabled people receiving such funding.

Concerns about the policies of more than 40 CCGs were first raised in January 2017 by Fleur Perry, herself a recipient of NHS continuing healthcare.

Her research showed that many CCGs had drawn up policies suggesting they would move disabled people eligible for NHS CHC out of their homes and into institutions against their wishes, even if the cost of a homecare package was only slightly more expensive than residential care.

These concerns were subsequently taken on by EHRC, which believes that “blanket” policies that have imposed “arbitrary” caps on funding and fail to consider the specific needs of individual patients are “a serious breach” of the Human Rights Act, the CCGs’ public sector equality duty and DHSC’s own NHS CHC framework .

But Perry has now spotted that DHSC has made a minor, but significant, change to its framework document, which is due to come into effect in October and is the first new version for six years.

 

Source: Government takes small step over risk of NHS care home discrimination | DisabledGo News and Blog

Local NHS is blackmailing service-users into accepting unsafe care, MPs hear : DisabledGo News


People with complex healthcare needs are being “blackmailed” by their local NHS bodies into accepting unsafe levels of care in their own homes, a committee of MPs has been told.

The public accounts committee was hearing evidence on the funding of NHS continuing healthcare in England.

Earlier this year, research by disabled campaigner Fleur Perry showed that more than 40 clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) appeared to be willing to move disabled people with high-cost support packages into residential or nursing homes against their wishes, even if the cost of a homecare package was only slightly more expensive than residential care.

The CCG policies apply to people who have complex health needs and have been assessed as eligible for care arranged and funded solely by the NHS, known as NHS continuing healthcare (NHS CHC).

Brian O’Shea, continuing healthcare adviser for Spinal Injuries Association, told MPs yesterday (Wednesday) that increasing numbers of CCGS were imposing “arbitrary financial caps” on those eligible for NHS CHC.

He said: “What we believe is happening is CCGs aren’t actually serious about incarcerating people in nursing homes because we don’t believe that there are enough nursing home beds available.

“What they are doing is they are using that as a tool to blackmail people into accepting unsafe levels of care and unsafe levels of funding to live in their own home or their preferred setting of care and rely on informal support to pick up the rest of the care.”

He said that one 53-year-old man with four young children – who has been running his business from his hospital bed – had spent six months in hospital recovering from a spinal cord injury and “has been told that he’s expected to move into a nursing home and not be allowed to go home and live with his family”.

Matina Loizou, chair of the Continuing Healthcare Alliance, a group of charities and organisations campaigning for improvements to continuing healthcare, said cost-capping was “a really worrying trend”.

She said such policies were being introduced across England, forcing people to choose between “accepting an unsafe level of care and staying at home, say for 100 hours of care a week rather than the 168 that they’ve been assessed to need, or moving out to a care home, regardless of whether or not that is where they want to be, or if it has been assessed to be the most appropriate place for them”.

She said such policies were “being bulldozed through in places like Leicestershire without much due regard to public consultation processes”.

When asked about people being forced to accept lower care packages than they need, in a later evidence session held by the committee, Professor Jane Cummings, chief nursing officer for NHS England, said there was a “clear set of criteria” that CCGs had to follow.

She said that through an improvement programme and “much greater oversight” of NHS CHC through improved data collection “we should have a much better ability to assess how many times that happens”.

And she said there was “a review process in place where people can ask for support if they don’t feel they have got what they need”.

Last week, it emerged that the Equality and Human Rights Commission had written to CCGs where caps had been introduced to ask how those policies had been developed, and to threaten them with possible legal action, warning that they might not comply with the European Convention on Human Rights and the Equality Act.

News provided by John Pring at www.disabilitynewsservice.com

Source : Local NHS is blackmailing service-users into accepting unsafe care, MPs hear : DisabledGo News

The UK’s hidden shame: disabled people trapped at home with no wheelchair | Frances Ryan | Opinion | The Guardian


Evidence of the dire state of NHS wheelchair provision across the country shows that the system is failing the very people who need it most

Source: The UK’s hidden shame: disabled people trapped at home with no wheelchair | Frances Ryan | Opinion | The Guardian

Extra social care funding from Government is not reaching the front line | Care Industry News


Providers understand the pressure that local authorities and CCGs are under, but as ADASS’ Budget Survey demonstrates, continued provider attrition threatens t

Source: Extra social care funding from Government is not reaching the front line | Care Industry News

NHS proposals to reduce autism diagnoses in south west London ‘deeply concerning’, warns charity | The Independent


Plans to reduce the number of children diagnosed with autism in south west London will leave vulnerable families unable to access “support they desperately need”, a charity has warned. The proposals to restrict diagnosis of the neurological disorder to the most severe cases are being discussed to ease pressure on services and long waiting times in five areas.

Source: NHS proposals to reduce autism diagnoses in south west London ‘deeply concerning’, warns charity | The Independent

Plans that could force people into institutions could be ‘front line’ of national problem | DisabledGo News and Blog


Plans by three NHS primary care organisations to tighten restrictions on care and support spending for service-users with complex healthcare needs are a “huge

Source: Plans that could force people into institutions could be ‘front line’ of national problem | DisabledGo News and Blog

Royal College of Surgeons slam plans to cut back on hip and knee replacements | DisabledGo News and Blog


Three clinical commissioning groups propose only operating on patients that have such severe levels of pain they cannot sleep or carry out daily tasks The Royal College of Surgeons has hit out at cost-cutting plans to ration who can receive hip and knee replacements. Three clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in the West Midlands have proposed slashing the number of people who qualify for hip replacements by 12% and introducing a 19% cut over who is eligible for knee replacements. Under the new rules patients would now need to have such severe levels of pain that they cannot sleep or carry out daily tasks to qualify for an operation. Board papers reported by the Health Service Journal suggest an “opportunity to reduce expenditure on hip and knee replacement surgery” by £2m a year. This would include only treating “severe to the upper end of moderate” cases, and very obese people with a body mass index of 35 or over after they had lost 10% of their weight, unless their problems are

Source: Royal College of Surgeons slam plans to cut back on hip and knee replacements | DisabledGo News and Blog

Department of Health ignores NHS continuing healthcare human rights warnings | DisabledGo News and Blog


Campaigners have warned more than 40 NHS primary care organisations across England that policies which could see service-users with complex healthcare needs forced into institutions are a breach of disabled people’s human rights. Despite the warning, the Department of Health last night (Wednesday) refused to say if it had any concerns about the policies on NHS continuing healthcare (NHS CHC), or whether they complied with its own guidelines. Research on the policies, published last week by disabled campaigner Fleur Perry, showed at least 44 clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) – and probably many more – would be willing to move disabled people with high-cost support packages into residential or nursing homes against their wishes. Perry, who edits the website Disability United, is herself a recipient of NHS CHC. Her research, using freedom of information requests, showed that the 44 CCGs had drawn up policies containing “concerning” phrases that suggested they would move disabled people

Source: Department of Health ignores NHS continuing healthcare human rights warnings | DisabledGo News and Blog