5 COVID-19 myths politicians have repeated that just aren’t true ; The Conversation


The purveyors of these myths, including politicians who have been soft peddling the impact of the coronavirus, aren’t doing the country any favors.

Source: 5 COVID-19 myths politicians have repeated that just aren’t true : The Conversation

Omega-3 supplements improved attention in some youths with ADHD : Medical News Today


New research finds that omega-3 fish oil supplements can improve attention in youths with ADHD who have low — but not high — blood levels of omega-3.

Source: Omega-3 supplements improved attention in some youths with ADHD : Medical News Today

Scientists may be getting closer to creating a universal flu vaccine : Medical News Today


We already have vaccines that prevent influenza, but there is a catch. Specialists have to keep creating vaccines that target specific flu strains if they want this preventive strategy to be effective. Can scientists create one flu vaccine to rule them all?

Scientists may be getting closer to creating a universal flu vaccine

person preparing flu vaccine

Influenza — which people commonly refer to as “the flu” — is one of the most widespread illnesses worldwide.

Two virus strains — influenza virus strain A and strain B — are responsible for the flu. This disease has led to between 9.3 million and 49 million estimated cases of illness each year since 2010 in the United States alone, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

As there are different viral strains, and each strain has many different subtypes, doctors must administer the correct vaccine each time. They need to use one that targets the specific strains and subtypes that are circulating in the population for this preventive approach to be successful.

So far, there has been no “universal vaccine” that can target all influenza viruses effectively. But are researchers getting closer to developing one?

 

Source: Scientists may be getting closer to creating a universal flu vaccine : Medical News Today

Amber Rudd’s new pension reform: how a collective defined contribution scheme works – inews.co.uk


Policy-makers in the UK seldom learn from how other countries tackle problems. But an announcement from Amber Rudd, Work and Pensions Secretary, shows in the field of pensions at least, the UK is trying to learn from what has worked well in other countries.

Rudd’s announcement concerns a type of pension known as ‘Collective Defined Contribution (CDC)’, which is common elsewhere in Europe but not currently possible in the UK.

But what is CDC and how does it differ from what we currently have?

Two workplace pension types currently exist

 

Source: Amber Rudd’s new pension reform: how a collective defined contribution scheme works – inews.co.uk

Autism: What is the link with zinc? : Medical News Today


Earlier research indicated an association between zinc and autism. However, until now, understanding the connection has been challenging.
A new study, published in Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience, suggests that a zinc deficiency in early childhood may contribute to autism.

Autism, or autism spectrum disorder, tends to cause difficulties in communication and social interaction.

Although every case is different, symptoms can include repetitive actions, reduced eye contact, and trouble recognizing emotions in others.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), around 1 in 59 children have autism. It appears to be four times more common in boys than girls.

Despite years of research, the medical community has yet to fully understand the mechanisms of autism, and theories about its origins abound.

Autism tends to appear in the first 3 years of life. During this time, synapses — the communication points between neurons — are forming and changing at a rapid rate.

 

Source: Autism: What is the link with zinc? : Medical News Today

Could poor protein trafficking be a factor in autism? : Medical News Today


A protein whose mutations are found in people with autism and other neurodevelopmental conditions helps keep connections between neurons in the brain running smoothly.

Newly published research — led by Rockefeller University in New York City, NY — reveals that the protein astrotactin 2 (ASTN2) can traffick receptors away from neurons’ surfaces and prevent them from accumulating there.

Connections between neurons are essential to brain function.

They work because receptors, which sit on the surfaces of cells, are always ready to partner with incoming neurotransmitters from other cells.

The process is dynamic and needs a continual cycle of receptors “on and off” the cell membrane to ensure rapid response to signals. Trafficking proteins help keep the receptors moving.

The recent study, which now features in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, has also suggested a mechanism through which autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), such as the neurodevelopmental condition autism, could arise from defects in ASTN2.

The exact causes of neurodevelopmental conditions are largely unknown, though many signs can be traced to early brain development. Scientists believe that the origins are complex and involve genetic, biological, and environmental factors.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), around 1 in 68 children from the United States have been “identified with ASD,” with boys over four times more likely be identified with it than girls.

Trafficking proteins

 

Source: Could poor protein trafficking be a factor in autism? : Medical News Yoday

Autism prognosis: Parental genes ‘incredibly useful’ : Medical News Today


While one main risk gene may make an individual susceptible to autism or another neurodevelopmental disorder, it is the whole collection of associated changes in their DNA that decides whether they develop it and how severe it becomes.

This was the conclusion that researchers arrived at after analyzing developmental, cognitive, and genome sequencing data of hundreds of people with known risk genes together with that of their parents and siblings.

They suggest that their findings explain why two people carrying the same risk gene, also known as the “primary mutation,” can have very different symptoms of the associated neurodevelopmental disorder.

“For example,” says senior study author Santhosh Girirajan, an associate professor of biochemistry and molecular biology at Pennsylvania State University in University Park, “when a parent and child have the same primary mutation but only the child develops the disorder.”

He explains that when diagnosing a disorder such as autism, the focus on finding the cause tends to be on identifying the “one primary mutation.”

However, this approach does not explain why many people with the same primary mutation can have widely different symptoms.

 

Source: Autism prognosis: Parental genes ‘incredibly useful’ : Medical News Today

Almost No Children in France are Medicated for ADHD: Here’s How They Define and Treat it! : Plain Live


Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC ) says that roughly 11% of American kids between 4 and 17 have been determined to have Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and on the off chance that you ask the American Psychiatric Association (APA), they keep up that despite the fact that exclusive 5% of American kids experience the ill effects of the turmoil, the finding is really given to around 15% of American kids. This number has been relentlessly rising, bouncing from 7.8% in 2003 to 9.5% in 2007.

Enormous Pharma assumed a noteworthy part in assembling the ADHD plague in the U.S., persuading guardians and specialists that ADHD is a typical issue among youngsters and one that ought to be sedated. In any case, numerous nations can’t help in contradicting the American position on ADHD,  an extent that they have completely unique structures for characterizing, diagnosing, and treating it. For instance, the rate of kids in France that have been analyzed and cured for ADHD is under 0.5%. This is to a great extent since French specialists don’t think about ADHD as a natural issue with organic causes, yet rather a medicinal condition brought on by psycho-social and situational components.

Why France Defines ADHD Differently

 

Source: Almost No Children in France are Medicated for ADHD: Here’s How They Define and Treat it! : Plain Live