CHANGING ROOMS FOR EVERYONE


Five years after launching the first Baby Changing Room Awards and sponsoring the National Childbirth Trust Baby Change App, Britain’s leading nappy cream brand Sudocrem is once again pioneering the way with a new category to recognise the importance of Changing Places toilets for disabled children.

There are 800,000 disabled children in the UK but only 1058 Changing Places toilets to meet their needs. This means that parents like Laura Rutherford, whose son Brody, 5, suffers from GDD, epilepsy, hypermobility and hypotonia, is forced to change her son on a toilet floor. “Life beyond a baby changing table when your child is doubly incontinent means constant exclusions when you go out as a family. It’s heart breaking for us as parents and this is an issue that will sadly become harder and harder as he grows up. He is different not less. Time for change.”

 

Source: CHANGING ROOMS FOR EVERYONE

Advertisements

Trio of disabled campaigners back Changing Places petition | DisabledGo News and Blog


Three leading disabled campaigners have backed a petition that calls on the government to force all new large buildings to include a Changing Places toilet.

The petition, launched by Lorna Fillingham, who has a disabled child, has now been signed by more than 50,000 people, and will soon be delivered to the prime minister.

The campaign has been boosted by support from the crossbench peer Baroness [Jane] Campbell – herself a regular user of Changing Places toilets – Paralympian Anne Wafula Strike, and journalist and presenter Mik Scarlet.

There are currently only about 1,060 Changing Places toilets – facilities with extra space and equipment for disabled people who cannot use standard accessible toilets – across the whole of the UK, even though there are believed to be more than 250,000 disabled people who need them.

Guidance provided under British Standard 8300 recommends that such facilities should be included in larger buildings and complexes such as motorway services, sports stadiums, shopping centres, airports, town halls, schools and hospitals.

But Fillingham, who is working closely with Wafula Strike on the campaign, wants the government to make changes to building regulations to ensure that planning permission cannot be granted for such developments unless they include a Changing Places toilet.

The call in Fillingham’s petition mirrors a recommendation in last year’s report on disability and the built environment by the Commons women and equalities committee, which called for all large building developments to include a Changing Places toilet.

 

Source: Trio of disabled campaigners back Changing Places petition | DisabledGo News and Blog

Changing Rooms For Everyone  | DisabledGo News and Blog


Five years after launching the first Baby Changing Room Awards and sponsoring the National Childbirth Trust Baby Change App, Britain’s leading nappy cream brand Sudocrem is once again pioneering the way with a new category to recognise the importance of Changing Places toilets for disabled children.

There are 800,000 disabled children in the UK but only 1058 Changing Places toilets to meet their needs. This means that parents like Laura Rutherford, whose son Brody, 5, suffers from GDD, epilepsy, hypermobility and hypotonia, is forced to change her son on a toilet floor. “Life beyond a baby changing table when your child is doubly incontinent means constant exclusions when you go out as a family. It’s heart breaking for us as parents and this is an issue that will sadly become harder and harder as he grows up. He is different not less. Time for change.”

Since 2012, Sudocrem has campaigned for change with an award scheme to recognise the importance of good nappy changing facilities. Past winners have included Mothercare, John Lewis, Sainsbury’s and the National Museums of Scotland.

 

Source: Changing Rooms For Everyone  | DisabledGo News and Blog

‘A lack of toilets led me to choose surgery’ | DisabledGo News and Blog


Paralympian Anne Wafula-Strike had to wet herself on a train journey, last year, because the accessible toilet was out of order. Now, she hears from others facing similar problems. Marni Smyth has spinal muscular atrophy, and has used a power chair since she was three. She needs a hoist to get on to a toilet, and says finding accessible loos that could accommodate her needs became a daily struggle. “When I first went to university, I would avoid drinking as much as I could, because I needed to go home and leave a night out early,” she tells Anne Wafula-Strike, in the Paralympian’s report for the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme. “I’d need a hoist and plinth to get changed on, and they just weren’t .” Two years ago, she took the step of undergoing surgery for which she had no medical need. She had a suprapubic catheter fitted, so she does not have to get out of her chair to go to the toilet. She says she knows others who have also had the operation, and it has “completely changed my

Source: ‘A lack of toilets led me to choose surgery’ | DisabledGo News and Blog

Premier League clubs make ‘limited progress’ over disabled access | DisabledGo News and Blog


Premier League clubs have made limited progress on improving access for disabled fans, campaigners have said. Thirteen out of the 20 sides are failing to provide the required number of wheelchair spaces, says the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC). It says only seven clubs have larger, fully equipped toilets, while seven clubs are breaking Premier League rules on providing information to fans. The Premier League said clubs were working hard to improve facilities. Clubs may miss disability deadline Warning over disabled access A BBC report in 2014 found that 17 of 20 clubs did not provide enough wheelchair spaces. Clubs later set a self-imposed deadline to meet standards by August 2017 and the Premier League has pledged to publish a report then to highlight the work carried out. EHRC chair David Isaac said it would launch an investigation into clubs who had failed to meet the minimum requirements and did not publish a clear action plan or timetable for improvement. “The end

Source: Premier League clubs make ‘limited progress’ over disabled access | DisabledGo News and Blog

Petition update · Changing Places debated in the House of Commons · Change.org


This evening there has been a debate in the House of Commons regarding community toilet facilities for those with disabilities, including Changing Place facilities. The general consensus was that more needs to be done to include these facilities. I’ve included a link, the debate starts at 20.24, and I do get a mention 🙂

Source: Petition update · Changing Places debated in the House of Commons · Change.org

In Britain, it’s not just the train toilets that disabled people can’t get into | DisabledGo News and Blog


For the majority of us planing an outing is not that difficult, but when a disabled person and especially a disabled person using a wheelchair, this can be a minefield.

you need to double check everything and then you can not be guaranteed that all will go to plan. For all transport needs to be adequately accessible and so do the venues and this includes the toilets. What can be stated as being accessible is many times not correct. This may not be intentional by the transport providers and the venue operators, but mainly through their ignorance of the different aspects of disabilities and the varying requirements.

Even if all are suitably accessible will there be a sufficiency of the numbers available. Bus seating being only one example for there will only be one space available and this could be already taken by standing passengers or passengers with prams, who may be reluctant to move from a disability space and I believe that there is no lawful requirement for them to do so, just respect for the disabled person or persons.

Until there is a lawful requirement to provide full disability access and the educating of the Government, business and the general public there can be no full equality for people who are disabled, for the Equality Act is not sufficient.

 


A few years ago I met friends at a restaurant that had been getting great reviews. I triple-checked that they had wheelchair access (their website made no mention of access) and was assured that they did. Google Street View – I’d checked – showed a mammoth step, but they promised me a ramp. The ramp, as I found when I arrived, was a hastily arranged plank of wood, which they were hoping to shunt me up. Failing that, the chef and waiters would carry me – Cleopatra-style, but without the dignity. “Don’t worry,” the manager said. “The chef is very strong.” Options limited, I reluctantly agreed.

Source: In Britain, it’s not just the train toilets that disabled people can’t get into | DisabledGo News and Blog