Trump urges Barr to prosecute those who damage monuments | TheHill


President Trump on Friday directed Attorney General William Barr to prioritize prosecution for those who damage federal monuments as the administration pushes to protect statues and monuments from

Source: Trump urges Barr to prosecute those who damage monuments | TheHill

Trump praises National Guard for dispersing protesters ‘like a knife cutting butter’ : MSNBC


During a Thursday roundtable in Dallas, President Trump, praised the National Guard for dispersing Minneapolis protesters ‘like a knife cutting butter.’ The panel discusses the way in which Trump describes force against Americans.

Source: Trump praises National Guard for dispersing protesters ‘like a knife cutting butter’ : MSNBC

A short history of black women and police violence : The Conversation


Young men make up the majority of black people killed by police in the US. That’s fed a perception that black women are somehow shielded from the threat of police violence. They aren’t.

Source: A short history of black women and police violence : The Conversation

Can the president really order the military to occupy US cities and states? : The Conversation


President Trump has warned that he will send the military into states to curb protests. Is Trump’s warning bluster? Or does the president have the authority to send the military into American cities?

Source: Can the president really order the military to occupy US cities and states?
The Conversation

How one man fought South Carolina Democrats to end whites-only primaries – and why that matters now : The Conversation


South Carolina’s black community has a long history of fighting for democratic rights.

Source: How one man fought South Carolina Democrats to end whites-only primaries – and why that matters now : The Conversation

Donald Trump’s War On LGBTQ Americans Is Ramping Up | HuffPost UK


Less than two weeks after he was inaugurated, Donald Trump did something that, at the time, seemed decent: On Jan. 31, 2017, the White House put out a press release promising to safeguard LGBTQ rights. Specifically, the memo claimed the new president would not overturn a 2014 Obama administration executive order protecting LGBTQ employees of federal contractors from workplace discrimination.

“President Donald J. Trump is determined to protect the rights of all Americans, including the LGBTQ community,” the memo stated.

Trump’s been gaslighting America on the subject of LGBTQ rights ever since. Through executive orders, agency rule-making and tweets, the Trump administration has been blasting away at the LGBTQ community from the start.

Now, the administration is ratcheting up the stakes, filing a series of briefs ― one late last week and one expected this Friday ― in a critical LGBTQ rights case scheduled to come before the Supreme Court this fall.

On Oct. 4, the court will hear oral arguments in a trio of cases considering whether the protections of Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, religion and sex, extends to sexual orientation and gender identity.

To put it simply, the question before the court is: Can you be fired for being gay or lesbian or bisexual or transgender?

 

Source: Donald Trump’s War On LGBTQ Americans Is Ramping Up | HuffPost UK

The Trump administration wants to make it easier to fire women who act too ‘masculine’ – ThinkProgress


Thirty years ago, in Price Waterhouse v. Hopkins, the Supreme Court held that “sex stereotyping” is forbidden by a federal law banning employment discrimination. “We are beyond the day,” Justice William Brennan wrote in the court’s plurality opinion, “when an employer could evaluate employees by assuming or insisting that they matched the stereotype associated with their group.”

Nevertheless, the Trump administration filed a brief last week asking the Supreme Court to bring back the day when an employer could evaluate employees by assuming or insisting that they matched the stereotype associated with their group.

The Trump Justice Department’s position in R.G. & G.R. Harris Funeral Homes v. EEOC wouldn’t nuke Price Waterhouse entirely. But it would severely weaken protections against sex discrimination, and give employers broad new authority to fire employees who do not comply with stereotypes about how people of a particular gender should appear.

It would do so, moreover, in service of the broader goal of denying civil rights protections to transgender workers. The thrust of the Trump administration’s position in Harris Funeral Homes is that, if existing law is broad enough to protect trans workers from discrimination, then that law must be rolled back — even if doing so will legalize a fair amount of discrimination against cis women in the process.

 

Source: The Trump administration wants to make it easier to fire women who act too ‘masculine’ – ThinkProgress

The forgotten history of segregated swimming pools and amusement parks : The Conversation


Summers often bring a wave of childhood memories: lounging poolside, trips to the local amusement park, languid, steamy days at the beach.

These nostalgic recollections, however, aren’t held by all Americans.

Municipal swimming pools and urban amusement parks flourished in the 20th century. But too often, their success was based on the exclusion of African Americans.

As a social historian who has written a book on segregated recreation, I have found that the history of recreational segregation is a largely forgotten one. But it has had a lasting significance on modern race relations.

Swimming pools and beaches were among the most segregated and fought over public spaces in the North and the South.

White stereotypes of blacks as diseased and sexually threatening served as the foundation for this segregation. City leaders justifying segregation also pointed to fears of fights breaking out if whites and blacks mingled. Racial separation for them equaled racial peace.

These fears were underscored when white teenagers attacked black swimmers after activists or city officials opened public pools to blacks. For example, whites threw nails at the bottom of pools in Cincinnati, poured bleach and acid in pools with black bathers in St. Augustine, Florida, and beat them up in Philadelphia. In my book, I describe how in the late 1940s there were major swimming pool riots in St. Louis, Baltimore, Washington, D.C. and Los Angeles.

Exclusion based on ‘safety’

Despite civil rights statutes in many states, the law did not come to African Americans’ aid. In Charlotte, North Carolina, for example, the chairman of the Charlotte Park and Recreation Commission in 1960 admitted that “all people have a right under law to use all public facilitates including swimming pools.” But he went on to point out that “of all public facilities, swimming pools put the tolerance of the white people to the test.”

His conclusion: “Public order is more important than rights of Negroes to use public facilities.” In practice, black swimmers were not admitted to pools if the managers felt “disorder will result.” Disorder and order defined accessibility, not the law.

 

Source: The forgotten history of segregated swimming pools and amusement parks : The Conversation