Disabled people and care being provided by Personal Assistants


Received through the ROFA (Reclaiming Our Future Alliance) network:

A worker at Inclusion London has mentioned that some Disabled people are being asked to replace funding for Personal Assistants with volunteers to undertake their personal care by some Local Authorities.   Inclusion London would be grateful for your thoughts and  any examples of expectations from social workers to use volunteers to make up for cuts in your support package. Email Henrietta.Doyle@inclusionlondon.org.uk
I am aghast that this could be on the agenda of any authority.
This is extremely worrying and hopefully is not being contemplated within many Local Authorities. That being said, could you advise your thoughts to  Henrietta.Doyle@inclusionlondon.org.uk.
Hopefully this worrying situation can be stopped.
My own view on this is what messages are these local authorities, who are in the process of asking for volunteers to replace paid carers, sending to the paid care workers. For the huge responsibility that these care workers undertake within their role for the low remuneration they receive, this is deplorable. No paid care worker should be only on the Minimum Living Wage, but should be, at least on the Living Wage and even above.
To be a care worker requires them to be committed to the person they are caring for, be responsive to the needs and requests from the cared for person and conduct themselves respecting the cared for persons dignity, privacy and the confidentiality with regards to the information they will be aware of about the cared for person and also their family.
They are required to attend at the times required according to the respective care packages and inform the cared for person when they are unable to do so with sufficient time for a replacement care worker to cover the caring shift to be found. Where the cared for person is deemed to be vulnerable and therefore be at risk of abuse, safeguarding is therefore an area of concern and a DBS (Disclosure and Barring Service) check is required.
You cannot say that one person requiring care is the same as the next person requiring care, as we are all individuals and therefore have our own views. This is especially so for persons with learning disabilities and those with Autism. In these instances it takes considerable time to understand each individual and their routines, for to not take this into account could cause the cared for persons to have an adverse reaction, which if a full understanding is not known could and most likely will create situations where harm could occur to the carer and the individual concerned. The carer needs to understand that they are technically a guest in the cared for persons home and as such they should act accordingly.
While a volunteer could and should be capable of all of the above, will all volunteers respect the commitment that is required to undertake care. After all they will be undertaking this on a voluntary basis so will they really commit to engaging with regards to timings. Then what will occur if they cannot attend , say to illness, will the cared for person have a bank of volunteers they can call upon.
These Local Authorities are only looking at their own interests. If they are so committed to using volunteers, why do they not have a volunteer Chief Executive and then there will be a multitude of funds saved.
That you could say is flippant, but where is the difference with regards with paid carers.
Any local authority who undertakes using volunteers could be open to a challenge on ‘Duty of Care’.

I escaped from the Grenfell Tower fire – but now we face a new trauma


Unfortunately this was a disaster waiting to happen and if only the residents of Grenfell Tower had been listened to could well have been averted.

Again the surviving residents are not being listened to, they are the experts and not the faceless ones within the Kensington and Chelsea council and Government, who are not prepared to meet with the Grenfell Tower survivors.

We again hear the phrase ‘lessons will be learnt’, but how many times has this phrase been quoted over the years in many varied circumstances. But are these lesson learnt, no they are not. Is the phrase just something to say in the hope it will placate the the public, but has no effective meaning as the respective authorities have no desire to learn.

People power can be effective, if only we could all engage with each other. Yes, there could be a petition and if you have 100,000 signatories or more this will generate a debate in Parliament, but what does that mean. Yes, it will be debated but to what effect, for to be effective Parliament needs to engage and just a debate is not good enough. In these petition a good proportion of the UK population has taken the time and effort to sign the respective petition, but our elected Members of Parliament are not that committed to engage with the petition or a sufficient number of them are not. Unfortunately many MPs just vote along Party lines and not with the will of the people who voted for them. Are they elected Members for their Constituents or elected members for their Party, for in many instances they cannot be both.

But for the Grenfell Tower survivors they do need to listened to and any persons within the council or Government need to be held accountable for the actions or to be more correct their inactions.

I implore those in authority to meet and engage with the survivors and then act in accordance with the survivors.

In first NFL game since Trump remarks, Jaguars owner links arms with players taking knee during anthem – The Washington Post


Many Baltimore and Jacksonville players in London demonstrated together before kickoff. Shahid Khan, who joined his players in the demonstration on a world stage, is believed to be the first NFL team owner to participate in an anthem protest. All the players appeared to have remained standing for the British anthem. This is a developing […]

Source: In first NFL game since Trump remarks, Jaguars owner links arms with players taking knee during anthem – The Washington Post

Trump wants you to fear refugees and migrants. Here are eight books that push back. – The Washington Post


From “The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay” to “The Brothers,” eight books that complicate Trump’s ugly, simplistic portrait of aspiring Americans.

Source: Trump wants you to fear refugees and migrants. Here are eight books that push back. – The Washington Post

The child abuse inquiry has been devastatingly inept – but it must go on | James Rhodes | Opinion | The Guardian


The key issue for me, and probably for most of the survivors who this inquiry was designed to give a voice to, is one of trust. Theresa May fought for this inquiry.She fought for us. Back in July 2014 when she announced it as home secretary, you could almost see the eye-rolling going on among certain Tory party members. Yet, to her immense credit, she persevered. And then came the catalogue of mistakes, disasters and obstructions that, to all but the most naive of us, simply scream cover-up.

Source: The child abuse inquiry has been devastatingly inept – but it must go on | James Rhodes | Opinion | The Guardian

Teen Stood On Same Street Corner Every Sunday. 5 Years Later, Stunned By What He Accomplished. – InspireMore


17-year-old Kevuntez King is from a single-parent home and grew up in a crime-filled part of…Read More »

Source: Teen Stood On Same Street Corner Every Sunday. 5 Years Later, Stunned By What He Accomplished. – InspireMore

We Didn’t Choose This (A Letter to My Children) » Lauren Casper


Walk up to any adoptive family, look at the children, say the words, “You are so lucky!” and watch the adoptive parents cringe.Don’t worry – this isn’t a “10 things not to say” post. This is an explanation about something deeper. This is a glimpse into the side of adoption that doesn’t always…

Source: We Didn’t Choose This (A Letter to My Children) » Lauren Casper

‘Dear education secretary’: a social worker’s open letter on the state of the profession | Community Care


Practitioner and blogger Social Work Tutor appeals to the government to rethink its approach to reforming the profession

Source: ‘Dear education secretary’: a social worker’s open letter on the state of the profession | Community Care