ADHD and sexuality: Effects, dysfunction, sex drive, and more : Medical News Today


Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) causes a range of symptoms, including hyperactivity, difficulty paying attention, and behavioral problems. ADHD may also affect romantic relationships, feelings of self-worth, or even the ability to perform sexually.

These markers are not used to make a diagnosis, and they may be due to the disorder itself or develop as a side effect of medicines used for treatment.

 

Source: ADHD and sexuality: Effects, dysfunction, sex drive, and more : Medical News Today

Hello My Name Is – Hello My Name Is, a campaign for more compassionate care


Following Kate’s death in 2016, Kate’s husband and co-founder of the campaign, Chris is keeping the campaign alive through conference talks across the world, book writing, presenting awards and social media – find him on twitter @PointonChris

 A message from Kate about the campaign…

“Hello, my name is Dr Kate Granger MBE and I’m the wife of Chris and the co-founder of the #hellomynameis campaign”

I’m a doctor, but also a terminally ill cancer patient. During a hospital stay in August 2013 with post-operative sepsis, I made the stark observation that many staff looking after me did not introduce themselves before delivering my care. It felt incredibly wrong that such a basic step in communication was missing. After ranting at my husband during one evening visiting time he
encouraged me to “stop whinging and do something!”

 

Source: Hello My Name Is – Hello My Name Is, a campaign for more compassionate care

Carer Voice event ‘Working Together’ Friday 20 October 2017


For the last 18 months 3 Family Carers of relatives with Learning Disabilities and/or Autism (Chris Sterry, Judith Gwynn and Kate Chapman) have been working together with a PHd student (Rachael A Black) at the University of Sheffield (Department of Human Communication Sciences) using the framework of Co-production. This was initially to provide research for Rachael’s thesis required for her PHd, but also to have a meaningful outcome for LD Carers within Sheffield, UK

At the start of this co-production Rachael enquired through Sheffield Mencap & Gateway for carers of persons with Learning Disabilities to work with her on her PHd project. During the last 18 months we have had regular meetings at the University of Sheffield on how we would proceed with this project and what our initial outcomes would be. Initially through general discussions, which Rachael was recording, it became clear that the recurring situations was around carers communications with the range of Service Providers. Within the context of Service Providers it included Sheffield Adult Social Care through Sheffield City Council, various health providers ( being GPs, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals, Community Health, and many other health areas) together with the independent Care Providers including charities, voluntary and private independent providers.

So that we were not restricted around our own views we decided to create 2 surveys, 1 to be completed by LD carers reflecting on their interactions with Service Providers and the other survey to be completed by Service Providers reflecting on their interactions with LD Carers. The surveys were created on Survey Monkey and during their creation we had a number of meeting to discuss how these were to be formed, the number of questions to be included and the specific questions. When we were all satisfied with both surveys they went live on Survey Monkey and electronic links were disseminated through our various range of contacts within Sheffield, UK.

We also discussed how we wished to to use the information from these surveys in addition to the original outcome for Rachael’s thesis. and decided we would wish to do this in a form of a presentation. We looked at possible dates and venues and obtained costings and also viewed each venue and then using co-production decided which venue to book and how we would advertise the event and provide a means for LD Carers and Service Providers to book to attend the event, which we did through Eventbrite and agreed on a format for a flyer and a website (Carer Voice) and the event title being Carer Voice Working Together.

Working Together Event Presentation 2017

 

Carer Voice ‘Working Together’, The Presenters from left to right, Chris Sterry, Judith Gwynn, Rachael A Black and Kate Chapman
Carer Voice ‘Working Together’, Presenter Rachael A Black Stating the Principles of Co-production
Carer Voice ‘Working Together’ Carers and Service Providers working together
Carer Voice ‘Working Together’ Presenter Judith Gwynn answering questions at the end of the Presentation
Carer Voice ‘Working Together’ Presenter Kate Chapman answering questions

Carer Voice Final Notes

Thank you for coming today and now you have seen the presentation and been involved in the workshops in which carers and service providers have worked together. This is how it should be for we are all here for the same reason, to ensure vulnerable persons, be they be our relatives or not, have provision to ensure their needs are met and they can then led their own lives.

Communication is but one key, but an extremely important key and without it all that is there can fail.

With this in mind I facilitate a support group LD Carers Butty Group, also known as Central group or Butty Group, where there is also a website LD Carers Butty Group and a mailing/distribution list. There are other support groups and details of these can be obtained from the Carers Centre and from Cathy and Kirsty from Sheffield Mencap & Gateway (Sharing Caring Project).

If you wish to be included in the mailing/distribution list please advise your email address. While this was produced with carers in mind, it does not mean that service providers cannot be included. Information sent will include areas relating to disability both local and national as well as notes for the support meetings.

Lunch is now ready and there are some leaflets from a selection of providers please view and take away and continue to network throughout lunch.

Do not forget to put on a post it the message you are taking away from this event and an evaluation form will be emailed to you, please return with your comments.

Our thanks to

University of Sheffield, Department of Human Communication Sciences for funding the event

Sheffield Central Fire Station for the room

Healthwatch Sheffield for the pens

Carer Voice ‘Working Together’, Chris Sterry giving the closing statement

 

After the Carer Voice : Working Together event we sent the following email with everyone who attended the event and also to those persons who could not attend but did express an interest in the event.

“We just wanted to get in touch to give you an update on the work we are doing following the Working Together Event in October.

 As a group we have met once to go through the feedback and will be meeting again in December. Where we will start drafting some standards and guidelines for communication between family carers and providers of service based on the information you gave us.  

 In early 2018 we will email these to you for your feedback. If you would not like to receive these emails then please do let me know and I will remove your name form the mailing list.

 We are also planning to pull together a small working group in the New Year to ensure the standards are accessible and practical. If you would be interested in being in this group, please do let us know. It will consist of 2 to 3 meetings at the University of Sheffield.

 Please also find attached some information about care workers in the independent and charity sector and the flu vaccine which we hope will be of use to you.

If you would be interested in receiving a copy of the presentation we gave on the day please do get in touch and I will send this to you.

Many thanks

Rachael and Carer Voice”

Flu Vaccine for Care Workers

Supporting People with Learning Disabilities get Flu Injection

 

We have now met in December and have started drafting some standards and guidelines for communication between family carers and providers of services based on the information given to us during the Carer Voice : Working Together event.

Further information on this will be issued within the next few months.

 

 

Carers Voice ‘Working Together’ : LD Carers Butty Group — WordPress.com


For the last 18 months 3 Family Carers of relatives with Learning Disabilities and/or Autism (Chris Sterry, Judith Gwynn and Kate Chapman) have been working together with a PHd student (Rachael A Black) at the University of Sheffield (Department of Human Communication Sciences) using the framework of Co-production. This was initially to provide research for Rachael’s thesis required for her PHd, but also to have a meaningful outcome for LD Carers within Sheffield, UK

At the start of this co-production Rachael enquired through Sheffield Mencap & Gateway for carers of persons with Learning Disabilities to work with her on her PHd project.

During the last 18 months we have had regular meetings at the University of Sheffield on how we would proceed with this project and what our initial outcomes would be. Initially through general discussions, which Rachael was recording, it became clear that the recurring situations was around carers communications with the range of Service Providers. Within the context of Service Providers it included Sheffield Adult Social Care

 

Source: Carers Voice ‘Working Together’ :  LD Carers Butty Group — WordPress.com

EHRC chair faces criticism from MPs over disabled commissioner’s boycott : DisabledGo News


The chair of the equality watchdog has faced criticism from MPs after admitting that a disabled commissioner appointed six months ago is still refusing to attend its board meetings.

Tory peer Lord [Kevin] Shinkwin has been boycotting meetings at the Equality and Human Rights Commission (EHRC) since April because of its refusal to appoint him to the post of disability commissioner.

He is refusing to attend meetings until the commission reinstates that role, and allows him to chair its new disability advisory committee.

He had applied last year for the post of disability commissioner but was told months later – just 36 hours before his first board meeting – that the role had been made redundant and that he had instead been appointed as a general commissioner and would not lead on disability issues.

David Isaac, EHRC’s chair, told MPs on the Commons women and equalities committee yesterday(Wednesday) that Lord Shinkwin was still not attending board meetings, and that the continuing stand-off was having “an adverse impact on our ability to mainstream disability and to do our work in the disability arena”.

Isaac told the committee that EHRC did not believe there was a need for a disability commissioner because of the decision to “mainstream” disability into its work.

He admitted that some of the members of the commission’s disability committee – which was scrapped earlier this year – “initially were unhappy” with the decision to scrap the disability commissioner role.

But he said they had showed in subsequent meetings that they “understand the commission’s approach and they approve of mainstreaming”.

Isaac claimed that all those applying to be members of the commission’s new, non-statutory disability advisory committee had accepted the decision to scrap the role of disability commissioner.

He said: “We have now made people comfortable that disability is mainstreamed and there is no longer a disability commissioner.”

But Tory MP Philip Davies told him: “It is not unreasonable for somebody to apply for a position, to be appointed to it, and to expect that position to be in place.

“You apply for a particular post, you are appointed to a particular post, and then you are told subsequently that that post… doesn’t exist anymore.”

Isaac blamed the length of time between the interviews last December and the decision to appoint Lord Shinkwin in April, an appointment made by the minister.

During that gap of several months, the statutory disability committee had “expired” and the board had decided that the post of disability commissioner should also be scrapped.

But the Conservative chair of the committee, Maria Miller, said it was “extraordinary” that the potential candidates for the post – including Lord Shinkwin – had not been told the role had changed since they applied for it.

She said: “There would be very few people who would not find that somewhat odd.”

She added later: “Why is your process so lacking in transparency?”

And she said: “I think the world will take a view on the fact that the EHRC has decided to abolish the role of a disability commissioner in a way which is clearly out of step with the disability committee.”

Davies said it was “quite clear” from minutes of a meeting on 27 March – which Isaac attended – that Greening had been appointing Lord Shinkwin to be the disability commissioner and not just a general commissioner.

But Rebecca Hilsenrath, EHRC’s chief executive, said it was “a matter of fact” that Greening had appointed him as a general commissioner and not a disability commissioner.

Isaac said he had done “everything I reasonably can” to negotiate a solution with Lord Shinkwin, including making approaches to Greening, the Government Equalities Office, and Tory peers.

He said: “I am keen to talk to him and would ask him to abandon the conditions he has attached to engagement.”

When Miller said she was “hugely disappointed” that the commission had still not found a solution, Isaac promised to contact Lord Shinkwin again, but he added: “I am very, very keen that he takes up his position as commissioner, but you can only be involved in dialogue if both parties agree to discuss the matter with each other.

“I believe we have done all we reasonably can to ensure that that dialogue happens.”

Lord Shinkwin told DNS in August that he would continue to boycott board meetings until the post of disability commissioner was reinstated.

He said in August: “My understanding from what I have been told is that I have to accept the abolition of the disability commissioner post and that I will not be chairing the disability advisory committee. I cannot accept either of those.

“I think it is absolutely essential that disabled people have a very strong voice as disabled people.

“We have equality needs the other protected characteristic groups do not have, and they need to be championed.”

News provided by John Pring at www.disabilitynewsservice.com

Helping People With Autism Communicate in a Disaster – Autism Parenting Magazine


Lately, the news has been immersed in images of the city of Houston, Texas  swallowed by a torrent of flood water.  We’ve felt sympathy for those affected, we’ve  worried about their welfare. And we’ve all probably thought, “What if that was my family?” We hope it will never happen, but sometimes it does.  Fire, flood, […]

Source: Helping People With Autism Communicate in a Disaster – Autism Parenting Magazine

Hope


We are all different so why should one person react the same as another, why not accept and respect a person for who there are, not how others wish them to be.

Bear this in mind and you and your son will come through.

ourownnormal

He’s 6, he has beautiful big brown eyes, a head full of lushious dark hair and Gorgeous olive skin.

He’s an amazing reader, fabulous at puzzles, he can name the actors names of any marvel character and knows anything there is to know about super powers.

He’s tidy, smart, sweet and particular.

By the age of two he knew all his colours, shapes, how to work the iPad, the apps and how to navigate round them better than I do now.

He can be loving, so loving, caring and thoughtful and so intelligent in his chosen fields.

I never realised as he was my first child, all the things he didn’t do. He didn’t wave goodbye, he didn’t like cuddles and he was always on the go. I just thought he didn’t like goodbyes, that he wasn’t an overly affectionate child and that he was ‘just a boy’. I was…

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Colours of autism spectrum described by CanChild researchers – Medical News Today


Children with autism have a wide range of ability to talk with other people, but it has been difficult to group children by their specific skills.

Source: Colours of autism spectrum described by CanChild researchers – Medical News Today