Parents Want Full Time Return To School For SEN Children


These schools are continuing to feel they are the experts, but experts at what.

Maybe on schools procedure, maybe on educational subject matter, but certainly not on children with disabilities, for that will be the parents and possibly the respective children, but still these schools are showing herd processing.

When will they realise that children are individuals and especially children with disabilities, for what maybe right and good for one, maybe wrong and maybe bad for another.

The schools are also ignoring Department of Education (DoE) guidance, which recommends all children come back fulltime.

But as the Government,early on in the coronavirus pandemic, introduced the Coronavirus Act 2020, which suspended numerous Local Authorities responsibilities, these actions are now coming home to roost.

To enable equality persons with disabilities require more not less, but this Government is unable to understand this. What I am not sure about is, could this be accidental or even more worrying, they already knew the consequences of these actions.

With this Government people with disabilities will never achieve equality, in fact equality will be even more distant.

Same Difference

Parents of children with special educational needs have told the BBC that their children are not being offered the same access to education as their peers because of the restrictions around coronavirus.

The BBC’s Nikki Fox spoke to Dawn Ashton who said she wanted a full-time education for her son Lewis who has been offered two days at Astley Park School.

Headteacher Kieran Welsh said a phased return would allow children to adapt to the new school routine.

“The positive impact of the phased return on children’s learning and well-being has been incredible and a joy to witness.”

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Lost To The Virus- Doreen Chappell


Again and again this Tory Government have let down people with disabilities, be it Welfare Benefits, Social Care and now it is the NHS with Health Care.

Disabled people have rights and these were strengthened through the Care Act 2014 with increased rights for the family carers. But what did this Government do at the start of COVID-19, they created the Coronavirus Act 2020, in which they included areas which removed some of the fought for benefits within the Care Act 2014 and they did this with minimal consultation and Parliament debate.

But the DNRs were being created by the NHS, GPs to be exact and the NHS is not governed by the Care Act 2014, as they have other rules and regulations under which they are supposed to conform, The Hippocratic oath.

The Hippocratic oath covers several important ethical issues between doctors and patients. The oath first establishes that the practitioner of medicine give deference to the creators, teachers, and learners of medicine. … The oath serves as a contract for doctors to work towards the benefit of the health of the public.

Disabled people are members of the public so ‘Do Not Resuscitate’ (DNRs) notices should not be placed on any patient until they have been consulted.

This is a prime example of neglect, one of the safeguarding principles, however, the suspension of the Care Act 2014, in the Coronavirus Act 2020 means that neglect and safeguarding can not be used as a course of action.

One of the main reasons this Government suspended the Care Act 2014 through the Coronavirus Act 2020, but will the Human Rights legislation still be relevant, who knows.

Perhaps not, as at least one Judicial Review has be lost, so another win for this deplorable Government.

Same Difference

If Doreen Chappell’s first marriage was a disaster, her second one was a great success. She was born Doreen Brenda Ward in the East End of London, in 1936; her mother was a seamstress, her father, who had seen action at Gallipoli, later became a telecoms engineer.

It was a working-class household: Doreen left school at 15 to look for a job. Like many young women of the era, she became a typist and secretary, even having elocution classes to improve her chances of getting work.

Doreen married young, at 23. Her family didn’t approve – none of them attended the wedding – and when the marriage began to fall apart, they didn’t step in to help. “They thought that she’d made her bed, so now she should lie in it,” says her son, Simon. Doreen’s husband would disappear for weeks at a time, leaving her with the children…

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UK’s lack of social care is hitting disabled people in Covid-19 lockdown | Vox Political


The United Kingdom is the fifth- or sixth-richest nation in the world; we should be able to afford to handle Covid-19 while still giving the best-quality care to those who need it. But we don’…

Source: UK’s lack of social care is hitting disabled people in Covid-19 lockdown | Vox Political

Two councils return to Care Act compliance leaving five authorities suspending duties | Community Care


Article updated 22 May Birmingham and Sunderland councils have returned to applying the Care Act 2014 in full after a period suspending certain duties using emergency powers under the Coronavirus Act 2020. The authorities’ decisions means there are five councils operating the so-called Care Act easements – Coventry, Derbyshire, Solihull, Staffordshire and Warwickshire – down […]

Source: Two councils return to Care Act compliance leaving five authorities suspending duties | Community Care