Trafford care homes forced to close as council fees do not meet running costs | Care Industry News


Shawe Lodge Nursing Home in Urmston and Shawe House Care Home in Flixton are to close in May 2018.  The care provider running them cannot be certain that it will be able to meet the care needs of residents in the future, following years of receiving fees from the local authority, Trafford Council, that do not meet operating costs.  In addition, the provider has cited a lack of support or willingness to work in partnership from the national care regulator, the Care Quality Commission (CQC).

Ampersand Care Ltd, the operator of the two homes, made the decision to close Shawe House after unsuccessful attempts, over the past year, to increase the fees in each home. Concerns were expressed by the provider regarding ability to sustain levels of service going forward.  With the intended closure of Shawe House the providers intended to focus their resources on the redevelopment of the larger and more appropriate environment at Shawe Lodge. At the same time, the CQC has failed to support the provider in seeking alternative solutions.  A period of six weeks for this investment was deemed inappropriate by the CQC and consequently the company has no choice but to close both homes.  The priority now is to ensure that residents at both homes are helped to find alternative placements that meet their individual care needs.

 

Source: Trafford care homes forced to close as council fees do not meet running costs | Care Industry News

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CQC survey shows public find search for care extremely stressful | Care Industry News


Choosing adult social care in England is one of the biggest sources of stress compared to other key life events, according to a survey of 1,000 people carried out for the Care Quality Commission (CQC).

The findings come as the quality regulator is raising public awareness about how its inspection findings can help support people in making these important decisions.

The survey findings, out today, reveal that seven in ten (70%) adults who were responsible for choosing care in a care home or at home – either for themselves or a loved one – over the last three years have found it more stressful than choosing their child’s nursery or school, or a venue for their wedding or civil partnership.

52% of people surveyed had cited choosing a care home and 31% had cited choosing care at home in their top three most stressful life decisions.

People’s experiences varied across the country, with the highest proportion of people in the North East (60%), Yorkshire and Humber (56%) and the North West and East Midlands (both 54%) saying that choosing a care home was their most stressful life decision.

 

Source: CQC survey shows public find search for care extremely stressful | Care Industry News

Review of autism home abuse condemns out-of-area commissioning failings : Community Care


A review into the abuse of adults with autism at a home in Somerset run by the National Autistic Society (NAS) has called for an overhaul of the monitoring of out-of-area care placements.

Mendip House, which closed in October 2016 following a highly critical inspection, was part of an NAS ‘campus’ home to adults with severe autism placed by 30 local authorities and clinical commissioning groups from across the UK.

The review by the Somerset Safeguarding Adults Board (SSAB) said Somerset County Council (SCC) “had to invest in an expensive and labour-intensive enquiry because of the lack of rigor and failures of judgement of commissioning professionals”.

“Had the National Autistic Society addressed long standing concerns and the commissioners undertaken essential reviewing and monitoring, the workload of SCC and the Enquiry Team would not have been as extensive,” it added.

The review criticised the failure of the Care Quality Commission (CQC) to identify problems at the home earlier through its inspections.

It drew comparisons between Mendip House and Winterbourne View, the private hospital near Bristol where BBC Panorama exposed abuse of people with autism and learning disabilities.

It said: “There were over 30 different placement authorities across Somerset Court and although concerns were raised with SCC’s safeguarding team about other Somerset Court dwellings on at least four occasions between 2014-2016, not one identified concerns about Mendip House. Five years after the scandal of Winterbourne View Hospital this is remarkable.”

 

Source : Review of autism home abuse condemns out-of-area commissioning failings : Community Care

Remploy refuses to carry out basic background checks for care inspection roles | DisabledGo News and Blog


The company employed by the care watchdog to find service-users to help inspect residential homes and hospitals is failing to make the most basic background checks on its recruits, undercover journalists have discovered. The two reporters had been told of concerns about sloppy recruitment methods used by Remploy, the former government-run company now mostly owned by the discredited US outsourcing giant Maximus. To investigate those concerns, they applied to Remploy to become Experts by Experience (ExE), disabled people and others who have previously used care or health services and are paid to accompany Care Quality Commission (CQC) inspectors on their inspections of hospitals, health centres, nursing homes, day centres and homecare providers. In 2015, Remploy won three of four regional contracts to run the programme, covering the south and north of England, and London. CQC has recently begun the process of retendering the four contracts for another three years. But the two journalists were

Source: Remploy refuses to carry out basic background checks for care inspection roles | DisabledGo News and Blog

Care home inspections aren’t fit for purpose. Providers need support, not scrutiny | Social Care Network | The Guardian


Inconsistent assessments and inflexible appeal processes make a mockery of care quality regulations. Now even the CQC recognises the need for change

Source: Care home inspections aren’t fit for purpose. Providers need support, not scrutiny | Social Care Network | The Guardian

NHS NOTE SLIP NHS will investigate whether patients DIED because of a backlog of 22,000 undelivered letters over six years : Sun.


This is a disgrace and should never occurred.

However, and this does not excuse the deplorable situation, should not the intended recipients have queried why the written responses had not been received.

SUBSTRATUMS

The error emerged when a practice received a year-old letter.

HEALTH chiefs are investigating whether patients died or came to harm after a backlog of 22,000 letters went undelivered for up to six years.

Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust said the follow-up notes should have been sent to GPs and other departments from 2011 to 2017.

 There was a 22,000 letter backlog over a period of six years
Alamy
There was a 22,000 letter backlog over a period of six years

But some staff were unaware they had to click two onscreen buttons to send the messages, meaning they were never dispatched.

The letters were written following hospital outpatient appointments, outlining the treatment or tests the patient had received or the follow-up care they needed.

A number of patients are since thought to have died but it is not known if this was as a result of the blunder.

Affected patients will be contacted by the trust and a review is under…

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CQC figures reveal hundreds of care homes have gone two years since last inspection | DisabledGo News and Blog


More than 300 residential care homes for younger disabled adults have not been inspected by the care watchdog for more than two years, according to official figures obtained by Disability News Service (DNS). The figures, released by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) in response to a freedom of information request, also show that 87 care homes in England have not had an inspection since 2014. And 10 homes have not had an inspection for between three and four years. In all, the CQC figures show that, on 1 June 2017, there were 311 care homes for adults under 65 (out of a total of 5,358 homes across England) that had not had an inspection by the regulator in the previous two years. Despite DNS alerting CQC to the figures on Monday, the commission failed to respond to requests for a comment by noon today (Thursday). The commission’s press office claimed today that its “team of analysts” were not clear how the figures were compiled, even though the press office has been told that they were

Source: CQC figures reveal hundreds of care homes have gone two years since last inspection | DisabledGo News and Blog

The state of adult social care services 2014 to 2017 | Care Quality Commission


The state of adult social care services 2014 to 2017 presents findings from our comprehensive programme of adult social care inspections.

The report looks at what we’ve found about the quality of care across the full range of adult social care services that we regulate.

What we did

In October 2014, we formally rolled out our new inspection framework for adult social care. It includes overall ratings for each service as well as ratings in each of five key questions – whether they’re safe, effective, caring, responsive and well-led.

Between then and February 2017, we’ve completed over 33,000 inspections of around 24,000 adult social care locations.

We recognise there is fragility in the adult social care sector influenced by funding and resource pressures. But as the quality regulator, our focus in this report is on the quality of adult social care services and the impact that this has on people who use services.

What we found

Source: The state of adult social care services 2014 to 2017 | Care Quality Commission

‘Too many’ patients locked in for mental health care | DisabledGo News and Blog


Too many patients are locked into mental health rehabilitation wards far from home, a review of England’s psychiatric services suggests. The Care Quality Commission said there were 3,500 beds in locked facilities across the country, but it believes more people could and should get care in residential settings close to home. The report said safety on mental health wards was another major concern. NHS England said progress was being made with higher funding for care. ‘Kept in for 341 days’ Claire Murdoch, head of mental health for NHS England, added that while there were reasons for optimism, improvements – in line with the priorities set out by the NHS five-year plan – were needed. The Care Quality Commission (CQC) looked at all specialist mental health services across England – inspecting NHS care and services provided by the independent sector. It said almost all services were rated as good or outstanding for having caring and compassionate staff and that there were many examples of

Source: ‘Too many’ patients locked in for mental health care | DisabledGo News and Blog