Brexit News: France could BLOCK Calais to make Brexit HELL for Britain – SHOCK CLAIM | World | News | Express.co.uk


The UK Cabinet has expressed concern that if the port is blocked, it would cause mayhem for cross-Channel trade and potentially create massive damage to the UK’s economy.

According to the Department for Exiting the European Union (DExEU), the Dover-Calais crossing is a major weak point for the UK as it is the only roll-on, roll-off ferry hub.

Due to Calais being on French soil, it gives France the ability to cause major delays for lorry drivers that are headed to the UK, especially if they are transporting factory parts for time sensitive supply chains.

French customs officials also have the ability to bring British food exports to France to a grinding halt.

 

Source: Brexit News: France could BLOCK Calais to make Brexit HELL for Britain – SHOCK CLAIM | World | News | Express.co.uk

May’s Brexit plan raises UKIP from the dead | Conservative Home


Theresa May Mark One buried UKIP. Theresa May Mark Two is digging it up.  That is the only conclusion one can reasonably draw from today’s Opinium poll for the Observer, which shows Labour on 40 per cent, as last month, the Conservatives on 36 per cent, down six points, and UKIP on eight per cent, up five points.  The movement from the second to the third could scarcely be clearer.

That rise in support for what many will still think of, wrongly, as Nigel Farage’s party isn’t because of rebooted support for him.  Nor will voters be enamoured with the charms of Gerald Batten, of whom most of them will never have heard.  The driver of this result is plainly the Government’s new Brexit policy.

25 per cent of those polled approve of the way that the Prime Minister is handling Brexit, down from 30 per cent last month, while 56 per cent disapprove, up from 45 per cent last month.  Her net approval rating was minus eight per cent last month; it is 24 per cent this month.  The percentage of those who believe that Brexit is one of the most important issues facing the country is at its highest ever recorded by Opinium – 51 per cent this month (it was 42 per cent last month).  Overall, 32 per cent of those surveyed supported May’s Brexit plan and 31 per cent opposed it.

The EU referendum result killed UKIP.  After all, what was the point of supporting a party which aimed to make Britain independent once the British people had voted for precisely that?  The cause of Brexit was handed overnight to the governing party, which now had an instruction from the electorate to deliver it.  During the period between the referendum and last summer’s general election, Theresa May presented herself as the woman who would fulfil that mandate for “citizens of somewhere”: “Brexit means Brexit”.

Source: May’s Brexit plan raises UKIP from the dead | Conservative Home

May’s new Brexit plan. There is an alternative – from within the Government itself. | Conservative Home


The Cabinet was reportedly presented with a Treasury assessment of the impact of four outcomes to the Brexit talks: no deal, a Canadian-type deal, the EEA…and the Government’s own new scheme.  This itself should give pause for thought to the suggestion that, other than the EEA and no deal, there is no alternative to the plan agreed at Chequers.  It is a statement of the obvious that there will be as many of the last as there are people willing to propose them.

Far more to the point, however, there was one from within the Government itself – a proposal for it to seek “Canada Plus Plus Plus”, as David Davis once referred to it.  It is well known that DexEU was working on a draft of the White Paper that would outline this idea during the run-up to the Chequers meeting.  We are told that it went through some nine iterations.  The last ones were largely cuts for length.  None of them have been made public.  Until now.

Today, ConservativeHome publishes key extracts from a full draft of this White Paper.  They are not from one of the briefer final versions, but they set before our readers the main pillars of DexEU’s approach, which we are told were unchanged in any of those nine drafts.  As we write, we don’t have the advantage of also having seen the Government’s own White Paper, apparently to be published later, and thus the capacity to make comparisons between its text and that we publish today.

However, there will clearly be substantial overlap between the two – but, on the basis of the Government document published in the aftermath of Chequers, some key differences too.  A central one is the proposed regulatory treatment of manufactured goods.  In her Mansion House speech earlier this year, the Prime Minister referred in this context to “a comprehensive system of mutual recognition”.  She also set out in her Florence speech last year a three-basket approach to regulation.

“There will be areas which do affect our economic relations where we and our European friends may have different goals; or where we share the same goals but want to achieve them through different means.  And there will be areas where we want to achieve the same goals in the same ways, because it makes sense for our economies,” she said.  This was the approach agreed at the Chequers mee

 

Source: May’s new Brexit plan. There is an alternative – from within the Government itself. | Conservative Home