Covid’s Harmful Effect On Disabled People’s Activity Exposed By Survey


Again persons with disabilities are adversely affected through no fault of their own.

Disabled people are already not treated equally in UK society, even though there has been legislation to correct this. This includes the Disability Discrimination Acts 1995, and Disability Discrimination Act 2005, and Equality Act 2010, but much more needs to be done. The Government compound this in their attitude to disability benefits and now COVID, which has closed many opportunities for people, including disabled people to engage in sports, a lifeline for many disabled people to engage with.

Then there is the COVID vaccine programme which as only minimally looked at and provided priority to some disabled people, namely Downs Syndrome.

Much more needs to be done for any chance of equality to be gained, but this Government does not have a clue.

For they are also failing to act on Social Care, which many disabled people and others rely on to maintain life.

This is a Government of in-action when it comes to disabled people.

Same Difference

Covid-19 has reversed progress made in levels of activity among disabled people, according to a new report, amid concerns the gains may not be recovered because of the scarifying effects of the pandemic.

The observations come in the second Annual Disability and Activity Survey, which measures participation and attitudes towards physical activity among disabled people. Conducted by the disability charity Activity Alliance, it is seen as a companion to Sport England’s Active Lives study.Leading Paralympian says lockdown needs of disabled people ignoredRead more

The survey found that before the onset of Covid the number of disabled people who said they were physically inactive had fallen to 34%, down from 41% the year before. This corresponded with an 18% rise (from 40% to 58%) in the share of those who said they had “the opportunity to be as physically active as they want to be”. Following Covid, however…

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Disabled Tory peer says government rejection of pub access plan is an ‘insult’ | DisabledGo News and Blog


A disabled Tory peer has accused his own government of insulting disabled people by rejecting the chance to improve access to pubs, clubs and restaurants.

Lord [Kevin] Shinkwin said his party was in danger of “disowning” the laws it introduced through the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) more than 22 years ago.

He was speaking during a Lords debate – a few days before Christmas – on the recommendations made by a committee of peers that had scrutinised the impact of the Licensing Act 2003.

One of the committee’s recommendations was a call for the UK government to follow the Scottish government in adopting a measure* that would force all licensed premises to produce a “disabled access and facilities statement” when applying for a licence to serve alcohol.

The statement would include details on access provisions, and any facilities the business had for use by disabled people.

The committee said in its report: “The provision by licensees of disabled access facilities does not impose on them a new obligation or financial burden, since this is no more than what they are already required to do by law.

 

Source: Disabled Tory peer says government rejection of pub access plan is an ‘insult’ | DisabledGo News and Blog

Peer pressure sees minister finally announce date for taxi access laws | DisabledGo News and Blog


The government has finally announced the date when it will bring into force regulations that will ban taxi drivers from discriminating against wheelchair-users, more than 20 years after they were first included in legislation. From 6 April, taxi and private hire vehicle drivers will face a fine of up to £1,000 if they refuse to accept wheelchair-users, try to charge them extra, or fail to provide them with appropriate assistance. The announcement has been seen as a success for a committee of peers that called for the move last year. Successive Labour, coalition and Conservative governments have refused to bring the measures into force, since they were included in the Disability Discrimination Act 1995, and then incorporated into the Equality Act 2010. But the Equality Act 2010 and disability committee, which included several disabled peers among its members, and reported last March on the impact of equality laws on disabled people, called in its report for the measures to be implemented.

Source: Peer pressure sees minister finally announce date for taxi access laws | DisabledGo News and Blog

Wheelchair taxi rules will finally come into force… after 20 years


A report by peers on the impact of equality legislation on disabled people appears to have secured its first success, after the government agreed to bring into force taxi regulations – 20 years aft…

Source: Wheelchair taxi rules will finally come into force… after 20 years

The law about disability discrimination


Original post from Beyond Disability

‘………..


If you are disabled, or have had a disability, the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) makes it unlawful for you to be discriminated against in:

employment
trade organisations and qualifications bodies
access to goods, facilities and services
the management, buying or renting of land or property
education.

There are also DDA regulations dealing with buses, coaches and trains, which set out access standards for those vehicles to help people with mobility or sensory impairments, and learning disabilities.

The DDA was passed in 1995 to introduce new measures aimed at ending the discrimination which many disabled people face in their everyday lives. The DDA 2005 made important changes to the scope of the original legislation, including creating a legal duty for public authorities to actively promote disability equality. For more information about the duty read the Disability Equality Duty.

Together, the legislation provides disabled people with rights and it places duties on those who provide services, education and employment. It also encourages employers and employees to work together to break away from rigid employment practices, identify what adjustments and support might be needed, and find flexible ways of working that may benefit the whole workforce.

The DDA defines discrimination in a number of ways and outlines four specific types of discrimination: direct discrimination, failure to make reasonable adjustments, disability-related discrimination and victimisation.  ……….’

This was update:

Definition of disability under the Equality Act 2010*

An extract

‘……..You’re disabled under the Equality Act 2010 if you have a physical or mental impairment that has a ‘substantial’ and ‘long-term’ negative effect on your ability to do normal daily activities.

The Equality Act 2010 doesn’t apply to Northern Ireland – find out more on NI Direct..

What ‘substantial’ and ‘long-term’ mean

  • ‘substantial’ is more than minor or trivial – eg it takes much longer than it usually would to complete a daily task like getting dressed
  • ‘long-term’ means 12 months or more – eg a breathing condition that develops as a result of a lung infection…………….’

 

 

Contains public sector information licensed under the Open Government Licence v3.0.