Ruth Madeley: Actress Says Taxi Driver Took Her Wheelchair Away


This is how it is for disabled people, not just occasionally, but every day.

Disability is not the barrier, but people and systems are and it is way past the time when they should not be.

This has been the Disability Discrimination Acts 1995 and 2005 and then the Equality Act 2010, but they are far from sufficient, as this article shows.

More, much more needs to be done, because people with disabilities should never have to deal with these situations, but they do so on a daily basis.

Same Difference

Actress Ruth Madeley has told of how a taxi driver took her wheelchair away following an argument outside London’s Euston station last month.

The Bafta nominee said the driver told her it was “too difficult” to drop her at an accessible entrance and it wasn’t his problem if she couldn’t use stairs.

After a dispute over payment, she said he then took her wheelchair, put it in his boot and refused to give it back.

Transport for London has apologised for the “utterly appalling” incident.

Graham Robinson, TfL’s general manager for taxi and private hire, said: “We have contacted Ruth for more details so we can carry out a full and urgent investigation.”

The actress, from Bolton, was nominated for a Bafta for her breakthrough role in the BBC’s Don’t Take My Baby before starring in 2019’s Years and Years.

She wrote on Instagram that the driver of the private…

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Covid’s Harmful Effect On Disabled People’s Activity Exposed By Survey


Again persons with disabilities are adversely affected through no fault of their own.

Disabled people are already not treated equally in UK society, even though there has been legislation to correct this. This includes the Disability Discrimination Acts 1995, and Disability Discrimination Act 2005, and Equality Act 2010, but much more needs to be done. The Government compound this in their attitude to disability benefits and now COVID, which has closed many opportunities for people, including disabled people to engage in sports, a lifeline for many disabled people to engage with.

Then there is the COVID vaccine programme which as only minimally looked at and provided priority to some disabled people, namely Downs Syndrome.

Much more needs to be done for any chance of equality to be gained, but this Government does not have a clue.

For they are also failing to act on Social Care, which many disabled people and others rely on to maintain life.

This is a Government of in-action when it comes to disabled people.

Same Difference

Covid-19 has reversed progress made in levels of activity among disabled people, according to a new report, amid concerns the gains may not be recovered because of the scarifying effects of the pandemic.

The observations come in the second Annual Disability and Activity Survey, which measures participation and attitudes towards physical activity among disabled people. Conducted by the disability charity Activity Alliance, it is seen as a companion to Sport England’s Active Lives study.Leading Paralympian says lockdown needs of disabled people ignoredRead more

The survey found that before the onset of Covid the number of disabled people who said they were physically inactive had fallen to 34%, down from 41% the year before. This corresponded with an 18% rise (from 40% to 58%) in the share of those who said they had “the opportunity to be as physically active as they want to be”. Following Covid, however…

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I’ve been left on trains and called ‘a wheelchair’ – train companies need to improvfully e their treatment of disabled customers


A case in question showing how it is and this is not the exception, but the norm.

Disabled people have a right to be treated equally as with everyone else, they are not the problem. The problem is Society and those who should be there to assist.

The Disability Discrimination Act 2005 (DDA) and amended by the Equality Act 2010 provided access conditions on businesses and operators to provide equal access for persons with disabilities so they can live their lives on a similar basis to those of us who do not have disabilities.

But these acts gave so many concessions to businesses and operators so that in many instances there did not, fully, have to comply.

It is some 13 years since the DDA and some 8 years since the Equality Act, surely sufficient time for all businesses and operators to provide equal access. Why should a person with disabilities have to make extensive plans ahead of venturing out when people with no disabilities can do this, virtually on the spur of the moment.

This is not right and should not be allowed to occur.

Come on the UK, for goodness sakes get your Acts together.

Scope's Blog

This week, BBC Rip Off Britain highlights the experience of disabled passengers on trains. Far too often, inaccessible transport stops disabled people from enjoying the same opportunities as everyone else. In some cases, people have been through stressful and upsetting incidents – from train staff forgetting them to being treated like an object. In this blog, Steph shares her experiences. 

Every day across the UK 100s of disabled people are left stranded on train platforms. As a wheelchair user, I use trains frequently to go to work and to socialise. But, of course, the one thing that I’m constantly aware of when travelling is accessibility.

When it comes to train travel, both locally and nationally, train companies have issues with the way that they deal with disabled people.

If you’re disabled, you always have to plan ahead

I have to plan my journey before I go anywhere in ways that non-disabled…

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