Archives for posts with tag: disability hate crime

A new handbook on direct action, a national day of action on inclusive education, and a call for healthcare professionals to boycott disability benefit assessments were among campaign ideas suggested by disabled activists at a national conference.

The National Disabled People’s Summit saw up to 200 Deaf and disabled activists discussing ways to coordinate the fight against austerity and “reinvigorate” the disabled people’s movement.

Sean McGovern, co-chair of the TUC’s disabled workers’ committee, who chaired the event, said disabled people had not “passively” accepted the attack on their rights and services over the last nine years.

He told the conference that the aim of the event was to bring together Deaf and disabled people from the trade union movement, Deaf and disabled people’s organisations, and grassroots campaigns to “find ways to better pool our knowledge and experiences” and organise joint campaigning.

He said: “We are trying to get together to build our resources together… and hopefully stop fighting battles separately.”

A key part of the event saw disabled people take part in workshops aimed at producing ideas for future campaigning across areas such as accessible transport, inclusive education, independent living and social security.

Other workshops discussed how to develop those campaigns, for example through direct action and protests, trade union organising, and using the law and media.

The conference, at the headquarters of the National Education Union in central London, was funded by unions, and co-organised by the Reclaiming Our Futures Alliance.

Among the ideas suggested were the need for a national strategy and set of principles describing the aims of the disabled people’s movement, and for a new handbook for direct action protests, which would take leads from the activists’ handbook developed by the Disabled People’s Direct Action Network (DAN) and the activist toolkit used by the US disabled people’s grassroots group ADAPT.

The conference heard that there was a need to “spread protest and direct action everywhere”.

Other workshops suggested the need for a national education service that is “inclusive from the top to the bottom”, and called for a national day of action that highlights both the “good things that are happening” in inclusive education and the “threats” it is facing.

On independent living, fears were raised about the reinstitutionalisation of disabled people, particularly concerns about the number of people with learning difficulties being forced into long-stay private hospitals.

There were also calls for a legal right to independent living through a free national independent living service, paid for from general taxation, and for “real choice and control, where disabled people are in control and not professionals or social workers”.

On accessible transport, ideas for campaigns included a focus on the importance of disabled passengers being able to “turn up and go”, which the summit heard was “gradually being phased out” by train companies.

On mental health, there was a call for recognition that all people “contribute to society even if not contributing to profit”, for an emphasis on the “social causes of mental distress”, and for unions “to be able to represent people both working and not working and recognise us all as members of the working class”.

Among the campaign ideas on social security was a challenge to nurses and doctors who are members of the Royal College of Nursing and the British Medical Association, and who carry out disability benefit assessments, to “down tools and not take part” in such testing for ethical reasons.

There were also objections to Labour’s “pause and fix” policy position on universal credit, with activists demanding instead that the line on the government’s new working-age benefits system should be to “stop and scrap” it.

On disability hate crime, there were calls for more to be done to challenge and report such offences and to pursue them with the authorities “because we need charges, convictions and sentencing in order to make people confident to go down this path”.

There was also a call to “find allies in the police, Crown Prosecution Service and local authorities and elsewhere and work with them”, and to develop allies and alliances across different equality strands and build on their past successes, for example in combatting race hate crime.

Other workshops produced calls for international solidarity with disabled migrants and refugees and disabled people facing starvation in other countries; and the need for better training for union representatives, so they can provide improved support for disabled employees.

There was a recognition that cuts to jobs and services mean people are “having to work harder and faster in much more difficult conditions”; a call for regular disability arts protests; and for attention to be paid to the barriers faced by disabled people who are “intersectional”, such as black disabled women, or gay disabled men.

And there was a call for a new hub where disabled people and their organisations could share information and resources, for example on benefit assessments and appeals, as a way of taking action to “increase our knowledge of our rights, but equally importantly how we use that knowledge in our lives”, such as in day-to-day communication with social workers or service-providers or in “big strategic legal action cases”.

Ideas that came out of the workshops will now be collated and worked into a report to be published in the next few months.

News provided by John Pring at www.disabilitynewsservice.com

 

Source : Summit hears calls on direct action, assessment boycotts and hate crime : DisabledGo News

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Until everyone accepts that abuse is never acceptable then abusive situations will continue to occur. In a physical action of abuse then any associated injuries are more likely to be noticed, but with verbal, written and on-live abusive situations then injuries could well be invisible, but injuries there will be and in some instances some injuries which there may never be a recovery from.

The actions taken against all abusers should be effective and fit the crime to ensure all prospective abusers know what to expect if they start or continue to be abusive.

But many conduct themselves in accordance with the Children’s Nursery Rhyme ‘Sticks and Stones’ (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sticks_and_Stones) ending as ‘Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never break me.’, but in reality this is far from the truth as words can and in many instances are worse than ‘sticks and stones’ , for broken bones can be mended in time, but not necessarily the invisible ‘hurt from ‘words’.

Verbal and on-line abuse needs to be taken more seriously and all areas where this can occur need to deal with it more effectively, be they employers, retail venues, schools, churches and all other areas.

Govt Newspeak

If Poundland cared about what happened in their stores, they wouldn’t be abusing the jobless by making them work for nothing – Govt Newspeak


Finsbury Park Poundland attack: ‘Staff did nothing to help abused disabled woman’

Image result for images of poundland

A BARGAIN chain store has come under fire after one shopper witnessed a disabled woman get attacked while staff did nothing to help.

Journalist Katharine Quarmby was in Poundland in Finsbury Park last Friday when she saw a mother with a pushchair shouting abuse at a disabled woman.

“I think there was an argument about who was first in the queue for the till,” said Ms Quarmby. “The mum started abusing the woman and told her to lose weight and saying stuff which was unacceptable. It culminated in the woman having to say ‘please stop I’m disabled’. She had a catheter attached to the shopping trolley.”

Ms Quarmby, who works pro bono at the…

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Disabled campaigners have written to a government minister to warn him that “alarm bells are ringing” over the “massive discrepancies and inconsistencies” in the way the criminal justice system deals with disability hate crime prosecutions. The Disability Hate Crime Network says there is “increasing concern” over these failings. And it has asked solicitor general Robert Buckland to create “tighter and understandably clear guidance”, and to pressure the system to comply with the rules on disability hate crime. Stephen Brookes, a coordinator of the network, says in the letter that he and his colleagues felt “deep dismay” that six recent court cases involving violent attacks on disabled people – reported last month by Disability News Service (DNS) – had not been treated as disability hate crimes. Three of the six cases, spread across England and Wales, were murders, another saw the offender jailed for manslaughter, while two victims survived the violent assaults. One case saw a man with

Source: Minister told ‘alarm bells are ringing’ over disability hate crime | DisabledGo News and Blog


Disabled campaigners have written to a government minister to warn him that “alarm bells are ringing” over the “massive discrepancies and inconsistencies” in the way the criminal justice system deals with disability hate crime prosecutions.

The Disability Hate Crime Network says there is “increasing concern” over these failings.

And it has asked solicitor general Robert Buckland to create “tighter and understandably clear guidance”, and to pressure the system to comply with the rules on disability hate crime.

Stephen Brookes, a coordinator of the network, says in the letter that he and his colleagues felt “deep dismay” that six recent court cases involving violent attacks on disabled people – reported last month by Disability News Service (DNS) – had not been treated as disability hate crimes.

Source: Minister told ‘alarm bells are ringing’ over disability hate crime – Black Triangle Campaign


Ace News Services

#AceNewsReport – Aug.12: #UK Bullies leave plank of wood nailed to 9-year-old boy’s head after throwing it at him #AceNewsDesk reports

Graphic Images on sitehttps://t.me/acebreakingnews/2973http://pic.twitter.com/HLRk2pf8kg— PIX11 News (@PIX11News) August 12, 2017 #AceNewsDesk

EDITOR: Thanks for following as always appreciate every like, reblog or retweet for all our daily news and minute by minute 24-hours a day on https://t.me/acenewsdaily and free help and guidance tips are on AcePCHelp.WordPress.Com or you can follow our news as it breaks on AceBreakingNews.WordPress.Com

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An autistic boy was left with a one inch nail embedded in the back of his head after he was attacked by a group of “bullies” on his way home from school. Nine-year-old Romeo Smith required hospital treatment after a block of wood was left hanging from his head. His mother Natasha, 30, said she had been walking with Romeo towards their home in Mansfield, Nottinghamshire, when the attack happened.

Source: Autistic boy needs hospital treatment after ‘bullies’ leave plank of wood impaled in his head | The Independent


A police force is facing questions over its treatment of disabled people, after two reports by the independent watchdog into the way its officers dealt with young autistic men. In both reports, the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) investigation was impeded because crucial video evidence had been erased by Northamptonshire Police. Last year, the force admitted that it had launched an internal review of the way it treats disabled people, in the wake of the two incidents, despite originally denying that it was taking place. It has refused to say this week if that review has been completed. In the first case, an officer was caught on mobile phone footage apparently punching an autistic 17-year-old several times and swearing at him, after he and a trainee police constable had responded to reports of a disturbance at a house, in August 2015. The two officers had been asked by the owner of the house to remove the 17-year-old, who apparently refused to let the officers search him

Source: Police force twice erased video footage before watchdog inquiries | DisabledGo News and Blog


Two people involved in the brutal murder of a disabled man who was imprisoned and tortured to death have had their sentences increased by the court of appeal. Julie Mills and Nicole Lawrence were originally sentenced at Newcastle Crown Court last year after being convicted of involvement in the death of Lee Irving. He had been repeatedly kicked, punched and stamped on by James Wheatley, in attacks that took place over nine days, leaving him with multiple broken bones and other injuries. After he died, his body was taken on a pushchair through a housing estate and dumped on a patch of grass near the A1 in Kenton Bar, Newcastle. The court of appeal decided this week that the prison sentences of eight years and four years handed to Mills and Lawrence were too low, and resentenced Mills, Wheatley’s mother, to 10 years in prison, and Lawrence, his girlfriend, to seven years. Wheatley did not have his life sentence for murder – of which he will serve at least 23 years – challenged, while the

Source: Lee Irving murder sentences increased, but still no hate crime recognition | DisabledGo News and Blog


A chief constable has insisted that his police force was right not to treat the brutal murder of a man with learning difficulties who was hung from a tree and beaten to death by two “friends” as a disability hate crime. Disabled campaigners had criticised the failings of Leicestershire police following the murder of 23-year-old Brendan Mason. It is now 10 years since the deaths of Francecca and Fiona Pilkington, which led to the same police force being heavily criticised by the police watchdog for failing to protect the Pilkington family from years of harassment, and failing to recognise those offences as disability hate crime. Brendan Mason was found with serious injuries in Abbey Park, Leicester, on the morning of 5 July last year, and died later that day in hospital. He had been lured to the park, stripped of his clothes and hung from a tree and subjected to what police called a “vicious, sustained attack”, which was filmed by his attackers on their mobile phones and lasted for several

Source: Police force criticised after refusing to treat ‘lynch mob’ murder as hate crime | DisabledGo News and Blog


The solicitor general has agreed to appeal the allegedly “unduly lenient” sentences handed down to three people jailed for offences connected with the murder of a disabled man who was imprisoned and tortured to death. But the solicitor general, the Tory MP Robert Buckland, has refused to appeal against the sentence handed to James Wheatley, the man who murdered 24-year-old Lee Irving. His decisions have caused further confusion about the law on sentencing disability hate crimes, and its application by the criminal justice system. Wheatley, 29, from Kenton Bar, Newcastle, repeatedly kicked, punched and stamped on Irving in attacks that took place over nine days, leaving him with multiple broken bones and other injuries. After he died, his body was taken on a pushchair through a housing estate and dumped on a patch of grass near the A1. Wheatley was found guilty of murder and was sentenced to life in prison, and will have to serve at least 23 years. But if the murder had been dealt with by

Source: Solicitor general appeals sentences on ‘disability hate crime’ murder | DisabledGo News and Blog

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